Film Reveals Never-Before-Seen Information About the Silk ...

[uncensored-r/Bitcoin] Silk Road Drugs, Death and the Dark Web Documentary 2017

The following post by FluxSeer is being replicated because some comments within the post(but not the post itself) have been silently removed.
The original post can be found(in censored form) at this link:
np.reddit.com/ Bitcoin/comments/7fgggr
The original post's content was as follows:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=h9OBjdDhADg
submitted by censorship_notifier to noncensored_bitcoin [link] [comments]

Bill from Bill & Ted To Helm Bitcoin & Silk Road Documentary

Bill from Bill & Ted To Helm Bitcoin & Silk Road Documentary submitted by youcancallmejoey to Bitcoin [link] [comments]

Bitcoin mentioned around Reddit: Silk Road: Drugs, Death and the Dark Web (2017) - The Silk Road, described as the Amazon of illegal drugs, appeared on the Dark Web in 2011. The brainchild of a mysterious, libertarian intellectual wh /r/Documentaries

Bitcoin mentioned around Reddit: Silk Road: Drugs, Death and the Dark Web (2017) - The Silk Road, described as the Amazon of illegal drugs, appeared on the Dark Web in 2011. The brainchild of a mysterious, libertarian intellectual wh /Documentaries submitted by BitcoinAllBot to BitcoinAll [link] [comments]

Alex Winter's kickstarter for his documentary on Bitcoin & Silk Road has 7 days left to get funded!

Alex Winter's kickstarter for his documentary on Bitcoin & Silk Road has 7 days left to get funded! submitted by PrimeStunna to Bitcoin [link] [comments]

Alex Winter (Bill from Bill+Ted) will be directing a documentary about Bitcoin, Silk Road, and Hackers

Alex Winter (Bill from Bill+Ted) will be directing a documentary about Bitcoin, Silk Road, and Hackers submitted by Bonesaw_1987 to movies [link] [comments]

Interesting BBC documentary about the internet, Tor, Silk Road and Bitcoin. [Bitcoin at 40:30 mark]

Interesting BBC documentary about the internet, Tor, Silk Road and Bitcoin. [Bitcoin at 40:30 mark] submitted by creative_artisan86 to Bitcoin [link] [comments]

From the Creator of Downloaded Comes Deep Web, A Kickstarter for a New Documentary on the Silk Road, Bitcoin, and More

From the Creator of Downloaded Comes Deep Web, A Kickstarter for a New Documentary on the Silk Road, Bitcoin, and More submitted by totallygeeky to Bitcoin [link] [comments]

Alex Winter Documentary Will Go Inside the World of Bitcoin, Silk Road

Alex Winter Documentary Will Go Inside the World of Bitcoin, Silk Road submitted by unigami to Bitcoin [link] [comments]

Keanu Reeves Reuniting With 'Bill & Ted' Co-Star Alex Winter, Narrating 'Deep Web' Documentary

Keanu Reeves Reuniting With 'Bill & Ted' Co-Star Alex Winter, Narrating 'Deep Web' Documentary submitted by binlargin to Bitcoin [link] [comments]

CNBC Digi-Doc: The Bitcoin Uprising [Full length Video]

CNBC Digi-Doc: The Bitcoin Uprising [Full length Video] submitted by bitcoinbravo to Bitcoin [link] [comments]

Butter is welcomed by /r/documentaries.

Butter is welcomed by /documentaries. submitted by scammerwatch1 to Buttcoin [link] [comments]

My letter to the SEC regarding the SolidX ETF

Dear SEC,
I stand opposed to any ETFs connected to Bitcoin or any other cryptocurrency. The reasons for my opposition are obvious, simple and evidence-based.
Leaving aside the fact that almost all cryptocurrencies are unregistered securities created by a wave of fake start ups who have stolen millions of dollars from retail investors, let's focus on Bitcoin itself.
We don't know who started Bitcoin for sure. The latest insider speculation is that a volatility trader working in New York and then London created Bitcoin after befriending a circle of traders who were conspiracy-theory minded libertarians and cult-members.
What we do know for sure is that Bitcoin propagandists tend to have incorrect beliefs about how economies should function. They don't understand the role of inflation and they are among the least productive citizens. I have yet to see them create meaningful products, jobs, or companies that add value to the global economy. They are engaged almost solely with zero-sum games and game theory.
There are also major threats present.
The two groups with the largest Bitcoin holdings are:
  1. DarkNet criminals who gained most of their cryptocurrency wealth from 2011 to present from trafficking narcotics and child sex slaves.
  2. The Chinese government.
We will come to the latter in a moment. The first group, DarkNet criminals, are well documented in the Silk Road case and also in the documentary 'I Am Jane Doe' which tells the story of how child traffickers accumulated a large number of Bitcoins via adverts published on Backpage.com, the website subsequently seized by the FBI.
We must be mindful of the fact that this group of hardened criminals most likely still owns a large percentage of Bitcoins as they have been led to believe the value will continue to rise until the "currency" is legitimized as a financial instrument. The rise in Bitcoin's questionable value, which comes with its own controversies, in recent years has made holding them immensely profitable for the first group. Not only did they make an immediate profit at the time of trafficking drugs and child sex slaves, but they have continued to profit from retail investors buying into the pyramid scheme structure of Bitcoin.
The lack of genuine liquidity in the cryptocurrency sector, even over-the-desk trades, also meant it would have been very difficult for them to convert much of their Bitcoins to cash. We must believe they have continued to accumulate cryptocurrencies instead.
This is a threat to society and politics. Criminals who become enormously wealthy in such a manner are bound to become a threat to democracies if they choose to become politically influential.
We now move on to the second largest group of Bitcoin holders - the Chinese government and their associates.
Bitmain are the operator of the largest Bitcoin mining facilities and they are also the largest manufacturer of Bitcoin (also Litecoin and Ethereum) mining machines which they ship globally. They have achieved this hegemony by being subsidized by the Chinese state. The massive amount of electricity they consumed was free and possibly the hardware itself was also subsidized. This would not be allowed to happen in China without the state benefiting from Bitcoin. China's recent stances against cryptocurrencies appear to be nothing more than a distraction tactic to avoid being implicated. They control the market.
Furthermore, we see from the Panama Papers that Bitmain is not an independent company and that it has layers of secret ownership.
https://offshoreleaks.icij.org/nodes/82022780
An explosion in the value of Bitcoin would make the Chinese state the de facto Central Bank of the world. With it they would be able to drain investment from western companies, channel the investment into their own companies, control national currencies by proxy, and control governments.
With all the above in mind, I cannot stress enough how dangerous a Bitcoin or cryptocurrency ETF is for global democracy. We must see it as nothing more than a tool for subversion, which cryptocurrency's most ardent supporters are happy to admit.
submitted by PatrickBitmain to Buttcoin [link] [comments]

An open letter to Erik Voorhees

Dear Erik,
I would like to respond to your letter titled "Some words for my friends".
It's been almost 10 months since we filmed you for our production of The Bitcoin Phenomenon. You were very gracious in taking the time to sit with us. Thank you again. We are getting ready to release our documentary along with full-length interviews in a couple of weeks. I wanted to address a couple of issues.
I specifically recall questioning you on how decentralized Bitcoin really is considering that exchanges served as central points of liquidity. In my view, this imposed a systemic risk to Bitcoin. In your response to the question, you countered this notion by stating that market-based centralization is nothing to worry about as market actors that abuse their position will quickly find their business erode.
Here is the clip pulled by our editor: https://vimeo.com/87747572
Based on Mt. Gox, it seems that certain markets do not respond that quickly or efficiently. Mt. Gox had substantial issues at the time of our interview back in May 2013. Yet, consumers didn't leave; you didn't either. Natural monopolies when combined with network effects, as exchanges are, have market power and a gravitational pull that is very difficult to erode organically. Based on the reaction, it seems that the majority of Bitcoiners did not sufficiently understand or know the risks of doing business with Mt. Gox.
Another example: As the founding publisher of ALL IN Magazine between 2003-2006, I had a front row seat to the poker boom. Several years ago, a few big poker players at Absolute Poker and UltimateBet suspected certain other players of being able to see the cards held by opposing players. These big players kept losing money in highly improbable ways to the same players. When the players that felt cheated raised the issue in the community, the poker community laughed away these notions of cheating at major poker rooms. Not only did the customers not leave in droves at the allegations of cheating, they laughed at the whistle-blowers instead. Then there was a smoking gun that proved cheating by certain owners on a scale of tens of millions of dollars. And guess what? Most people still did not close their accounts. Even with the ease of the Internet, even with low switching costs of going to another vendor, people generally stayed. Markets are not nearly as responsive nor as efficient as you think even when confronted with a fraudulent operator.
When it comes to money, consumers need protection. Consumers are not sophisticated enough to assess the strength of balance sheets or the veracity of representations made by financial operators. As a result, modern societies have developed regulatory safeguards around financial services. How many people lost money with bank deposits during the financial crisis? Zero.
In fact, in my view, consumer protection means less friction in the marketplace, not more. It means more efficiency, not less. If I had to read the full car rental contract every time I rented a car, it would not be more efficient for the market. If I had to read a terms of service or every return policy or the fine print of every account I opened, it would not make commerce more efficient. Instead, I rely on basic government safeguards to ensure fairness and standardization. In exchange, market operators get the benefit of the doubt from most consumers as a result of regulation. I know that my liability with credit cards is almost nil based on regulation. As such, online commerce and electronic payments are ubiquitous. If I cannot be liable for credit card fraud, I can be freer in my habits and purchases than being continually paranoid. I can trust vendors that I otherwise would not trust.
Regulation is justified when the following condition is met: The value gained from increased trust in the marketplace is greater than the cost imposed by regulation.
Complicated contracts and risks are better socialized rather than individually assumed and monitored. One way to socialize risk is through regulation. In a regulated financial marketplace, a consumer does not need to be that careful. I don't have to judge the safety of my local bank as it is FDIC-insured. A simple rule is that the more math it involves and the less hard goods are given in exchange, the more it needs to be regulated. (Like life insurance.)
The other aspect is that consumers are horrible at assessing the fair value costs of deferred or unseen risks. People cannot properly compute the odds and costs of unlikely events in the future. If they could, the car rental counter would not try to sell comprehensive insurance at the counter to people who already have insurance. I might not need as much consumer protection in finance, but I may need more protection in healthcare or in building codes than a doctor or an engineer respectively would. The vast majority of people cannot assess every risk in every complicated area of their lives, myself included. It is not efficient for the market either. Certain things need to be standardized through regulation.
As such, as the old saying goes that there are no atheists in foxholes, there are few libertarians when defrauded.
In fact, I would be willing to wager that 80-90% of Mt. Gox customers would welcome a Japanese government bailout if it means a full return of their coins. Your ideology is lost on the majority of today's Bitcoiners. Most people that own Bitcoin want to get rich or make their lives financially easier. That's it. The pursuit of principal is their guiding principle. Now, people love the idea of getting rich and doing good at the same time, but given the choice of only one or the other, the former will suffice for most.
And there is nothing wrong with wanting to make some money. There is nothing wrong with speculating. The prospect of making money is fun, exciting, and thrilling. It's fine to enjoy it. For some reason, your argument seems to be that there has to be a greater purpose for Bitcoiners other than just the prospect of making money. Why require this? This should be legitimate enough of a purpose and goal. Ironically, you're the one playing into the hands that being mission-driven is what legitimizes money-making and Bitcoin.
Lastly, I cannot help notice your reference to Mt. Gox account holders as "brothers" in your note "Some words for friends". (The other day, Defcon at Silk Road 2 referred to his community as "comrades" in his note.) Calling for shared sacrifice among the recently devastated for the benefit of the greater good has a certain collective ring to it. Asking people to suffer from "falling towers" and repeated devastation wreaks of calling for martyrdom (of a dot-com variety.)
If the Bitcoin movement actually requires enormous sacrifice, of the devastating variety no less, merely for the future benefit of humanity, one may counter that the ongoing minor tragedy of one's annual tax bill seems like far less of a sacrifice. This is also a sacrifice that many times accrues to the benefit of others. What's the difference?
I am more confused by the philosophical tenets of the Bitcoin movement than ever. Does it require shared sacrifice for the collective good or is it to enable the present, profitable pursuit of self-interest?
Either way, the fact remains that Mt. Gox is a failure of a private company. It's not the fault of the government's, nor the media's, nor the banker's, nor Bitcoin naysayer's, but of a for-profit company with a once dominant market position.
Yet, you offer not one word against the perpetrators of a possible loss of $300+ million, 6%+ of all outstanding Bitcoins. Even Alan Greenspan, a personal friend of Ayn Rand, came to terms with the limitations of an absolutist ideology post-financial crisis. I'm surprised by the vehemence of your position because you are both brilliant and eloquent.
Sincerely,
Bhu Srinivasan
Producer, The Bitcoin Phenomenon for SQ1.tv
P.S. -
Some aspects of the reaction to Mt. Gox remind me of the episode of the Wire when one of Marlo's crew blames Omar, NASDAQ, 9/11, and the government for why he can't pay Marlo. Marlo responds: "Omar ain't no terrorist. And you ain't no Delta Airlines neither. You are just another n----- that got his shit took." Classic. Marlo on Mt. Gox:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dTIlZUOu0Rc
submitted by SQ1tv to Bitcoin [link] [comments]

I am Alex Winter, director of the upcoming of DEEP WEB documentary. AMA.

Hi guys. I am filmmaker Alex Winter. You probably know me from my past acting roles and my documentary about Naptser, DOWNLOADED. My latest project, DEEP WEB (http://www.deepwebthemovie.com/), focuses on the arrest of Ross William Ulbricht, the entrepreneur alleged to be “Dread Pirate Roberts ” -- founder of online black market Silk Road. The film also discusses how the minds and thought leaders behind the Deep Web and Bitcoin are now caught in the crosshairs of the battle for control of a future inextricably linked to technology. Here's a preview:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=aV6ePZ6SmL4
With DEEP WEB coming this spring to EPIX and the Ross Ulbricht trial happening as we speak, I thought it was time to hop back on Reddit. Looking forward to your questions. AMA.
Proof: https://twitter.com/alxwintestatus/558019588747558912
Hey everybody, gotta go!! Thanks SO MUCH for your fantastic questions! I love doing these! Please make sure to see Deep Web when it comes out, from Epix!!
submitted by alxwinter to IAmA [link] [comments]

Why I believe Bitcoin price will reach $300 very soon

As you all know the price of Bitcoin is climbing to significant higher price points ($150+) due to more and more positive news coming out over the validity and therefore acceptance of bitcoin. I'm a firm believer that we will see new highs for the price of bitcoin sometime this year. I have come to the conclusion 3 months ago that the price has to increase and test the $266 high sooner rather than later. There are several reasons and events that have happened over the course of the last 3 months that have consolidated this view.
1) The number one reason which evoked this thought was that mining difficulty was getting rapidly higher (at a rate of 30-35%) and the 2016 blocks completion rate was getting faster. However, at the time the price was stagnating at $100-110. This would render mining not very profitable and soon more powerful ASICs would need to come to the market to justify the continuation of mining activity or the mining market would collapse or perhaps the PoW function would need to be re-thought. Something had to give and I thought it would be the price. I felt we would need to see $150-250 prices but only in a favourable environment where more people would see bitcoin as a legitamate currency. This favourable environment was becoming more and more apparent after hearing various VC investors ploughing millions of dollars into start-ups.
CLARIFICATION: In a favourable environment more miners enter the market with newer, more powerful ASIC hardware rendering the current miners with their less powerful and now outdated ASIC hardware no longer profitable. This forces the current miners to hold on to their Bitcoins and wait to sell at a higher price removing this supply of Bitcoins from the market. This creates an upward price squeeze in a favourable environment.
2) VC funding into many bitcoin start-ups has taken off dramatically over the summer where coinlab got $500,000, Coinbase raised $5million and many other Bitcoin startups received $10,000-50,000 from Bitcoin venture capitalist firm BTCVC. While there were lots of early technologies that had funding and failed in the past several decades bitcoin, atleast is the only technology that is becoming adopted in over 80 countries world wide. For a currency Bitcoin is apolitical for a technology it is still not fully utilised. VC funding tends to happen when hope/speculation and confidence in a technology is evident and there seems to be plenty of confidence in it.
3) The closure of Silk Road in my opinion is a great thing for Bitcoin only because it removes the association of illicit drug commerce and the notion that such illegal activity is the main utility of Bitcoin. Regardless of what anyone thinks of drug use and trade it's evident that the number one currency used to trade illicit drugs is the US dollar and notably the $100 bill. Example of note is HSBC's direct involvement in facilitating transfers of $650m of Latin American drug money to and from the US which supposedly prevented a total financial collapse in 2008.
4) Many countries other than US have given Bitcoin the green light for acceptance: Germany legally declared Bitcoin as private money and legal tender (thats subject to tax but at least its legal), Canadian and UK financial services governing bodies declared that no legislation will be placed on Bitcoin, the exchanges or services. Government sanctioned Chinese state TV channel CCTV twice aired documentaries on Bitcoin in the summer.
Overall there are more and more services and utilities for Bitcoin cropping up every week and with that more and more confidence in the digital currency is observed. This is now reflected in the price but some like Falkvinge will argue that it's overpriced due to speculation. But what's wrong speculation? In financial markets, every currency, commodity and company need speculators as ultimately speculators aid the price discovery and determine a fair value. In turn the resulting liquidity indirectly provides wealth and value to the company/commodity/currency.
As shown in this article one of the main issues with Bitcoin is that it doesn't know if its a currency, commodity or asset as it exhibits all three tendencies but conversely therein lies its strength as well. Bitcoin has a set of properties that allow it to have all three classifications and I believe confidence in its adoption is gained by this fact.
Indeed the original premise of Bitcoin is that it's a currency and fulfils the basic criteria which makes it money; it's a medium of exchange, divisible, fungible, portable and scarce which supposedly gives it a store of value. Hence it's been coined the term digital gold. Like Gold it's apolitical however, unlike Gold where it's tangible and safe in ones possession Bitcoin's store of value is derived from its core attribute and that is its cryptography. Paradoxically Bitcoin is not tangible but it can be sent to the other side of the world in minutes and that is value. It can also be stored on a thumb drive and taken across borders without anyone knowing. This is not possible with gold. Bitcoin achieves this with the help of its encryption protocol. The Sha256 encryption protocol so far cannot be cracked and as long as that is secure Bitcoin's utility as a digital currency/asset/commodity remains and with that greater adoption and further fair value determination.
The future is bright, the future is Bitcoin
submitted by Justlite to Bitcoin [link] [comments]

Battle Over Bitcoin: China Backs US Startup Coinbase And US Falls Behind In Virtual Currencies.

Indeed, virtual currencies are nothing new to the Chinese. For example, more than 100 million people on the social platform QQ have used the Q coin for more than 10 years. And after China’s state-run China Central Television, or CCTV, ran a half-hour-long documentary on bitcoins, downloads of apps for processing and “mining” bitcoins soared in the world’s second largest economy.
Bitcoin, long the plaything of the Western ubernerd, now appears poised to grow substantially in China and other markets, like the euro zone, where government meddling in native currency valuations has left many distrustful of the money in their bank accounts.
Americans don’t have this problem -- yet. And that may be a problem in itself. According to bitcoin proponents, if the U.S. tries to ignore the nascent currency, writing it off as a financial fad with less value than the seemingly stable dollar, Americans risk ceding to the Chinese and others control of the future of what could be the most disruptive force in monetary exchanges since the credit card. In turn, the dollar and the ability of the U.S. to navigate global currency conflicts could be seriously weakened.
“Here’s the bottom line: Bitcoin has much higher popularity outside the U.S. and much higher potential outside the U.S.,” observed Andreas M. Antonopoulos of the Bitcoin Foundation. “If you go to an American and say, ‘Hey, there’s this new thing, bitcoin,’ they say, ‘Well, what’s wrong with the dollar?’ That question is different in other countries.”
Bitcoins are a finite, Web-based currency created in 2009 by a group of hackers working under the nom-de-Internet Satoshi Nakamoto. Exactly 10,952,975 bitcoins are in circulation, all of which have been purchased on exchange networks or mined. The currency is mined using software that processes transactions on the bitcoin network, adding groups of transactions, called blocks, to the chain. Miners are paid about 25 bitcoins per block. That digital money can then be used to purchase a variety of goods online, from legitimate software to heroin on the infamous virtual black-market Silk Road.
Bitcoin surged in value to $266 last month, thrusting the currency into the mainstream spotlight as investment poured in from sources as diverse as the hapless Brothers Winklevoss (of Facebook infamy) and Union Capital Ventures principal Fred Wilson (an early investor in Zynga, Twitter, and Kickstarter). Suddenly, everyone was talking about buying bitcoins. But the bubble burst in late April, and in the U.S. at least, bitcoin faded from the news. That was not the case in China, where Antonopoulos said downloads of bitcoin clients have eclipsed those in the U.S.
Bitcoins are mined in several steps. After downloading a bitcoin client, such as Coinbase (which serves as a wallet in which to store the bits of code that constitute the digital money), miners often join pools where they share computing power to decode algorithms in which bitcoins are hidden. The concept of bitcoins and bitcoin mining is cryptic for many people, even some otherwise forward-thinking American investors. The irony is that, for now, American startups are leading the bitcoin charge, and the U.S. government was the first to issue guidance on using the currency as payment -- a seemingly tacit recognition of bitcoin’s validity as legal tender.
Why China Poses A Threat
Feng Li, the IDG partner who chose to fund Coinbase, said the Chinese have yearned for access to a virtual currency since the central government cracked down on the use of Q coins.
Q coins were introduced in March 2002 by Tencent Holdings Ltd. (HKG:0700), the parent company of the country’s most popular instant-messaging service, QQ , and they currently average an annual transaction value of more than 1 billion yuan ($163 million). That value is growing at about 15 to 25 percent each year.
Q coins, purchased with yuan, are predominantly used to buy virtual products and services in QQ and its related online games and social media. Originally, Tencent regulations prevented Q coins from being traded between users or converted back to yuan, but allowed users to trade points and purchase Q coins with their game accounts, then use the black market to convert them into cash. That caused concerns at the People’s Bank of China, China’s central bank. In January 2007, converting game points to Q coins was banned, and Tencent reiterated that Q coins constitute a product, not a currency, which seemed to satisfy the concerns.
“There has already been proof with the Q coin,” Feng said of the Chinese likeliness to start using bitcoin. “It’s been very well circulated and very well adopted.”
Already, shops on Taobao -- the Chinese equivalent to eBay Inc. (NASDAQ:EBAY), owned by Alibaba.com Ltd. (HKG:1688) -- accept bitcoins as payment for goods, as does the similar service, Tencent’s PaiPai.com.
The Chinese are embracing bitcoins in other ways. The first bitcoin fund began to raise money in June, with the goal of raising 20 million yuan. The fund’s investment threshold is 10,000 yuan, and it will mature in four years.
Q coin’s popularity isn’t the only reason bitcoin has appeal in China. As it turns out, China is the perfect place for bitcoin mining. While much of the developed world is well into the transition from personal computers to mobile devices, China’s PC market is still thriving, which provides the necessary computing power to run a successful business converting electricity into mined coins. Price caps on electricity already create wasteful use of energy in China, so running a code-crunching computer for hours on end isn’t as costly an investment as it would be in the U.S. And so-called “gold-mining” or “gold-farming” businesses already exist in China’s cybersphere. None of that will come as a surprise to any “World of Warcraft” player: Gamers in Chinese urban sweatshops are known to sit in front of glowing blue screens for hours, slaughtering players in the game for their spoils or mining gold deposits found in the sprawling milieu of Blizzard Entertainment’s international blockbuster. Those treasures are then sold to players in the game for real money.
China has a heavily controlled currency, which also makes bitcoin attractive.
“The more controlled the currency is, the harder the transactions are, the more friction there is in the national currency, the more appealing the coin is,” Antonopoulos said, noted that the most appealing place to use bitcoin would be a country whose economy is a veritable train wreck -- like Zimbabwe, except that the southern African nation lacks the necessary technology. “I would say China is perfect,” he said. “It’s got the penetration, it’s got the smartphones, it’s got the Internet and the people are familiar with virtual currencies. And, it’s got the not-as-appealing national currency.”
Regulation In The U.S.
Guidance issued in March by the U.S. Treasury Department said that companies issuing or exchanging online cash, including bitcoin, would be subject to the same scrutiny as traditional firms such as the Western Union Co. (NYSE:WU) to prevent money laundering.
Less than two months later, the Department of Homeland Security proved that edict had teeth.
Federal officials obtained a warrant Tuesday to seize an account tied to Mt.Gox, the Tokyo-based exchange company that handles about 80 percent of all bitcoin trades. Authorities accused Mt.Gox’s U.S. subsidiary, Mutum Sigillum LLC, of failing to register as a money-services company with the Treasury’s Financial Crimes Enforcement Network. An account held by the online-payments firm Dwolla was subsequently seized.
Many feared the warrant execution could cast a chill over the bitcoin industry as a sector centered on a borderless, decentralized money came under the scrutiny of the federal government.
That proved not to be the case, Coinbase’s Ehrsam said. “For bitcoin to go mainstream, or as it goes mainstream, it will be used in a higher and higher amount of transactions,” he said, adding that Coinbase is registered as a money-services firm. “There’s no way there will be all this money flowing through an unregulated system.”
Chris Larsen -- the CEO of OpenCoin, a fellow San Francisco-based payment platform that processes most national currencies as well as bitcoin and its own virtual cash, Ripple -- agreed. “They definitely are regulating them, [and] we actually think that’s a really good thing for the industry,” he told IBTimes. “I thought the guidance was a good idea. One of the things the guidelines seem to make clear for the first time is that a virtual currency could be used for goods and services.”
The Price Of Regulation
But such regulation is a slippery slope, said Jerry Brito, a senior research fellow at the Mercatus Center at George Mason University.
Perhaps it begins with measures to prevent money-laundering, he said. But what measures would the government take to prevent the untraceable currency from being used for child pornography or human trafficking?
“Bitcoin has the potential to be a disruptive technology that would be beneficial to the economy, and we don’t want to kill off that potential to get at the other potential for bad stuff,” he observed. Brito, who plans to speak next month at a conference on virtual currencies organized by the National Center for Missing and Exploited Children, added: “We’re already the first country to enforce money-laundering laws against bitcoin. But the U.S. would be shooting itself in the foot if it went too far [with regulations] and either outlawed bitcoin or made the legal guidelines impossible to comply with.”
Will China Step In?
So far, Chinese bitcoin merchants have little to fear. For many, the CCTV segment on bitcoin seemed to be a signal from Beijing, which heavily controls the channel’s content, that the currency is worth exploring.
Some of those interviewed speculated that the Communist Party wants to see bitcoin stockpiled in China, allowing the government to invest in it if, or when, the dollar is shaken from its perch as the world’s reserve currency.
It remains to be seen whether -- or, more likely, when -- China will intervene in the trade of bitcoin in its own economy. But for the U.S. to experience widespread adoption of the currency, which is considered a necessary step for gaining a grasp on the bitcoin market, limited government control will have to allow the money, like the Internet that birthed it, to develop organically.
submitted by kazzZZY to Bitcoin [link] [comments]

I first heard about Bitcoin when......

I first heard about Bitcoin when I was watching a documentary on the Silk Road. It blew my mind knowing that users on there paid with Bitcoin, a digital currency. So naturally I watched a documentary on Bitcoin. Soon after I downloaded the Coinbase app and tried exchanging fiat currency for Bitcoin. At the time Bitcoin was under $100. Unfortunately i found it complicated and kinda gave up on the idea of owning digital currency. 3 years later my coworker brought up Bitcoin and how his friend was trying to convince him to buy some and hold on to it. Quickly I reacted and told him that I tried to buy some a few years back just to have some. Like I said the idea of digital currency blew my mind. I then downloaded the coinbase app to show him the depth chart and I couldn't believe that the cost of 1 Bitcoin was somewhere in the $500 range. Ever since then I've become consumed by Bitcoin and the blockchain technology all together. I guess what I'm trying to say is, how did u stumble upon Bitcoin? Ps. I'm a noob and I have very little knowledge of cryptocurrency in general.
submitted by cazaresivan to Bitcoin [link] [comments]

"The Rise and Rise of Bitcoin" at the Sundance Film Festival

The Rise and Rise of Bitcoin will be screening during the Sundance Film Festival in Park City Utah tomorrow, Friday, January 23rd, at 3:30 pm on Main Street.
If you happen to be in the area or are up for a good old fashioned road trip, we would love to have you there. Please email [email protected] with your information, and we will reply as soon as possible with your confirmation.
Matthew Roszac and Erik Voorhees will be speaking after the screening, accompanied by one of the film's producers, Ben Bledsoe. (me).
If you are unable to attend but would like to help, we would love any tweeting, posting, and general promotion that you are willing to offer. Thank you so much. Below is our press release information:
What: Screening of “The Rise and Rise of Bitcoin” documentary during the Sundance Film Festival. Paired with and followed by the annual Hackdance.
Where: 596 Main Street, Park City, UT 84060
When: 3:30 P.M. on Friday January 23rd.
Synopsis:
A computer programmer becomes fascinated with the digital currency Bitcoin, and through his involvement in the Bitcoin community, we learn about the impending global impact of this amazing new technology.
Or
Dan is a 35 year old computer programmer from Pittsburgh who lives a busy life. Along with balancing work, his marriage, and raising his three boys, Dan spends much of his time actively involved in all things Bitcoin. After discovering Bitcoin in 2011, his love and obsession for the crypto-currency was born, revealing an uncharted world of new possibilities for him to explore. Join us as we take a journey through the rapidly growing world of Bitcoin. Along the way, we'll follow the stories of entrepreneurs and startups that are helping shape the new financial frontier. We'll look at the competitive mining market and the various subcultures within the Bitcoin community. You'll encounter a variety of characters and opinions as we examine the social and political impact of an open-source digital currency. Will the rise of Bitcoin bring a monetary paradigm shift that will forever change the world?
Director: Nicholas Mross
Who: Paired with the annual celebrity Hackdance, this screening of “The Rise and Rise of Bitcoin” will both educate its viewers on this emerging new technology and system of finance, as well as offer questions for industry experts after the screening.
Matthew Roszak Founder & CEO, Tally Capital Mr. Roszak is founder and CEO of Tally Capital, a venture capital firm focused on blockchain enabled technologies and currencies. Named as one of the “who’s who of the crypto-currency world” by The Wall Street Journal, Mr. Roszak is a Bitcoin investor, advocate and speaker. Mr. Roszak has invested in over 20 Bitcoin start-ups, including BitFury, BitGo, Blockstream, Robocoin and Xapo. Mr. Roszak is also a founding partner with Crypto Currency Partners. Mr. Roszak is an advisor to several Bitcoin accelerators, including Bitropolis (Los Angeles), Decentral (Toronto) and The Chicago Bitcoin Center. In addition, Mr. Roszak is the co-chairman of The North American Bitcoin Conference. In 2013, Mr. Roszak founded the Bitcoin Supper Club, a gathering of CEOs, founders and extraordinary individuals in the Bitcoin community. Mr. Roszak is also a producer of the first ever Bitcoin documentary, “The Rise and Rise of Bitcoin.” Mr. Roszak is the chairman of BitcoinCares, a charity that leverages the Bitcoin community for initiatives in promoting education and fighting child hunger. Mr. Roszak is a member of the National Venture Capital Association, serves on the executive committee of the Chamber of Digital Commerce and is a lifetime member of the Bitcoin Foundation. Mr. Roszak is a board member and beneficial owner of various companies, including: Barefoot Landing, Eboost, InterAct911, MissionMode, Onramp, Pendulab, SolidSpace, TrueLook and Viwawa. Mr. Roszak has spent over 18 years in private equity and venture capital with Advent International, Keystone Capital Partners, Platinum Venture Partners and SilkRoad Equity, and has invested over $1 billion of capital (from start-up to IPO) in a broad range of industries.
Erik Voorhees Erik Voorhees is among the top-recognized serial Bitcoin advocates and entrepreneurs, understanding Bitcoin as one of the most important inventions ever created by humanity. Having been a featured guest on Bloomberg, Fox Business, CNBC, BBC Radio, The Peter Schiff Show, and numerous Bitcoin and industry conferences, Erik humbly suggests that there is no such thing as a “free market” when the institution of money itself is centrally planned and controlled. This blog is about the human struggle for the separation of money and state, and about Bitcoin as the instrument by which it will happen.
Ben Bledsoe Founder & CEO, 44th Floor Productions Producer of “The Rise and Rise of Bitcoin”
Ben Bledsoe is closely familiar with several sides of the entertainment industry. Having 2 Gold records as a musician, series regular and lead roles in film and TV, and having produced a wide range of Film, TV, and commercial projects, Bledsoe is thrilled to be a part of the team that is bringing The Rise and Rise of Bitcoin, a documentary showcasing this incredible new technology and system of finance, to the world.
Having premiered at the Tribeca International Film Festival, and released through Gravitas Ventures, the feature-length doc quickly reached the #1 Documentary spot on iTunes. The film has been requested, showcased, and discussed by companies like Bloomberg Media, government funded think tanks, International Banking companies and conferences, and much more. “The Rise and Rise of Bitcoin” offers a rare inside look at some of the visionaries who helped bring this groundbreaking and disruptive new technology out of the fringe and into the forefront.
For more information, please visit: www.BitcoinDoc.com
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Watch Rise and Rise of Bitcoin again

There are some great points in the documentary now that make you go wow.
Charlie Shrem saying "I'm spending thousands on lawyers. I don't want to go to jail", this was before his Silk Road involvement.
Daniel Mross paid 2700 bitcoins for 25 Ghs to Butterfly labs in 2012 (that's over 1M today), back then it was $13.5k.
Plus all the other goodies in the documentary... Makes you forget about the blocksize debates and all the other junk at the moment.
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BM: Season 4! What do you want to see?

I have recently gotten into the show and have fallen in love with it. The philosophy, it's (many) narratives, characters, cinematography and well just about everything.
With so many great topics covered already I am curious to hear what you are looking forward to in the next season! (I have heard that most of these are currently in production so it's impossible that any of these ideas are somehow influential but brainstorming is enjoyable none the less.)
Personally I would love to see episodes covering: - Piracy (cracked versions of implants, a black market for such devices?) - Large Scale Heists (Electronically, irl, or a combination of both) - Some implant that gives the user major enhancements but the user must pay to stay alive or to simply remember yourself (as they are at the will of these devices inside them) ((Entire History of You meets Man against Fire?)) - Effects of technology advances on children (changes within the classroom, turning them into antisocial drones?) - Large scale adoption of a new currency that goes terribly wrong (bitcoin vibes ;)) - Silk Road inspiration?
As a large fan of criminal studies and a law student (as well as a self admitted criminal documentary nerd) I would love to see anything surrounding criminal activity.
Would love for this thread to grow but obviously as a small user that likely won't happen hehe although feel free to comment some ideas you'd love to see the show produce.
submitted by oodam to blackmirror [link] [comments]

The wilkelvoss are trying to make bitcoin legit according to esquire magazine

Every idea needs a face, even if the faces are illusory simplifications. The country you get is the president you get. The Yankees you get is the shortstop you get. Apple needed Jobs. ISIS needs al-Baghdadi. The moon shot belongs to Bezos. There's nothing under the Facebook sun that doesn't come back to Zuckerberg.
But there is, as yet, no face behind the bitcoin curtain. It's the currency you've heard about but haven't been able to understand. Still to this day nobody knows who created it. For most people, it has something to do with programmable cash and algorithms and the deep space of mathematics, but it also has something to do with heroin and barbiturates and the sex trade and bankruptcies, too. It has no face because it doesn't seem tangible or real. We might align it with an anarchist's riot mask or a highly conceptualized question mark, but those images truncate its reality. Certain economists say it's as important as the birth of the Internet, that it's like discovering ice. Others are sure that it's doomed to melt. In the political sphere, it is the darling of the cypherpunks and libertarians. When they're not busy ignoring it, it scares the living shit out of the big banks and credit-card companies.
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It sparked to life in 2008—when all the financial world prepared for itself the articulate noose—and it knocked on the door like some inconvenient relative arriving at the dinner party in muddy shoes and a knit hat. Fierce ideological battles are currently being waged among the people who own and shepherd the currency. Some shout, Ponzi scheme. Some shout, Gold dust. Bitcoin alone is worth billions of dollars, but the computational structure behind it—its blockchain and its sidechains—could become the absolute underpinning of the world's financial structure for decades to come.
What bitcoin has needed for years is a face to legitimize it, sanitize it, make it palpable to all the naysayers. But it has no Larry Ellison, no Elon Musk, no noticeable visionaries either with or without the truth. There's a lot of ideology at stake. A lot of principle and dogma and creed. And an awful lot of cash, too.
At 6:00 on a Wednesday winter morning, three months after launching Gemini, their bitcoin exchange, Tyler and Cameron Winklevoss step out onto Broadway in New York, wearing the same make of sneakers, the same type of shorts, their baseball caps turned backward. They don't quite fall into the absolute caricature of twindom: They wear different-colored tops. Still, it's difficult to tell them apart, where Tyler ends and Cameron begins. Their faces are sculpted from another era, as if they had stepped from the ruin of one of Gatsby's parties. Their eyes are quick and seldom land on anything for long. Now thirty-four, there is something boyishly earnest about them as they jog down Prince Street, braiding in and out of each other, taking turns talking, as if they were working in shifts, drafting off each other.
Forget, for a moment, the four things the Winklevosses are most known for: suing Mark Zuckerberg, their portrayal in The Social Network, rowing in the Beijing Olympics, and their overwhelming public twinness. Because the Winklevoss brothers are betting just about everything—including their past—on a fifth thing: They want to shake the soul of money out.
At the deep end of their lives, they are athletes. Rowers. Full stop. And the thing about rowing—which might also be the thing about bitcoin—is that it's just about impossible to get your brain around its complexity. Everyone thinks you're going to a picnic. They have this notion you're out catching butterflies. They might ask you if you've got your little boater's hat ready. But it's not like that at all. You're fifteen years old. You rise in the dark. You drag your carcass along the railroad tracks before dawn. The boathouse keys are cold to the touch. You undo the ropes. You carry a shell down to the river. The carbon fiber rips at your hands. You place the boat in the water. You slip the oars in the locks. You wait for your coach. Nothing more than a thumb of light in the sky. It's still cold and the river stinks. That heron hasn't moved since yesterday. You hear Coach's voice before you see him. On you go, lads. You start at a dead sprint. The left rib's a little sore, but you don't say a thing. You are all power and no weight. The first push-to-pull in the water is a ripping surprise. From the legs first. Through the whole body. The arc. Atomic balance. A calm waiting for the burst. Your chest burns, your thighs scald, your brain blanks. It feels as if your rib cage might shatter. You are stillness exploding. You catch the water almost without breaking the surface. Coach says something about the pole vault. You like him. You really do. That brogue of his. Lads this, lads that. Fire. Stamina. Pain. After two dozen strokes, it already feels like you're hitting the wall. All that glycogen gone. Nobody knows. Nobody. They can't even pronounce it. Rowing. Ro-wing. Roh-ing. You push again, then pull. You feel as if you are breaking branch after branch off the bottom of your feet. You don't rock. You don't jolt. Keep it steady. Left, right, left, right. The heron stays still. This river. You see it every day. Nothing behind you. Everything in front. You cross the line. You know the exact tree. Your chest explodes. Your knees are trembling. This is the way the world will end, not with a whimper but a bang. You lean over the side of the boat. Up it comes, the breakfast you almost didn't have. A sign of respect to the river. You lay back. Ah, blue sky. Some cloud. Some gray. Do it again, lads. Yes, sir. You row so hard you puke it up once more. And here comes the heron, it's moving now, over the water, here it comes, look at that thing glide.
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The Winklevoss twins in the men's pair final during the 2008 Beijing Olympic Games. GETTY There's plenty of gin and beer and whiskey in the Harrison Room in downtown Manhattan, but the Winklevoss brothers sip Coca-Cola. The room, one of many in the newly renovated Pier A restaurant, is all mahogany and lamplight. It is, in essence, a floating bar, jutting four hundred feet out into the Hudson River. From the window you can see the Statue of Liberty. It feels entirely like their sort of room, a Jazz Age expectation hovering around their initial appearance—tall, imposing, the hair mannered, the collars of their shirts slightly tilted—but then they just slide into their seats, tentative, polite, even introverted.
They came here by subway early on a Friday evening, and they lean back in their seats, a little wary, their eyes busy—as if they want to look beyond the rehearsal of their words.
They had the curse of privilege, but, as they're keen to note, a curse that was earned. Their father worked to pay his way at a tiny college in backwoods Pennsylvania coal country. He escaped the small mining town and made it all the way to a professorship at Wharton. He founded his own company and eventually created the comfortable upper-middle-class family that came with it. They were raised in Greenwich, Connecticut, the most housebroken town on the planet. They might have looked like the others in their ZIP code, and dressed like them, spoke like them, but they didn't quite feel like them. Some nagging feeling—close to anger, close to fear—lodged itself beneath their shoulders, not quite a chip but an ache. They wanted Harvard but weren't quite sure what could get them there. "You have to be basically the best in the world at something if you're coming from Greenwich," says Tyler. "Otherwise it's like, great, you have a 1600 SAT, you and ten thousand others, so what?"
The rowing was a means to an end, but there was also something about the boat that they felt allowed another balance between them. They pulled their way through high school, Cameron on the port-side oar, Tyler on the starboard. They got to Harvard. The Square was theirs. They rowed their way to the national championships—twice. They went to Oxford. They competed in the Beijing Olympics. They sucked up the smog. They came in sixth place. The cameras loved them. Girls, too. They were so American, sandy-haired, blue-eyed, they could have been cast in a John Cougar Mellencamp song.
It might all have been so clean-cut and whitebread except for the fact that—at one of the turns in the river—they got involved in the most public brawl in the whole of the Internet's nascent history.
They don't talk about it much anymore, but they know that it still defines them, not so much in their own minds but in the minds of others. The story seems simple on one level, but nothing is ever simple, not even simplification. Theirs was the original idea for the first social network, Harvard Connection. They hired Mark Zuckerberg to build it. Instead he went off and created Facebook. They sued him. They settled for $65 million. It was a world of public spats and private anguish. Rumors and recriminations. A few years later, dusty old pre-Facebook text messages were leaked online by Silicon Alley Insider: "Yeah, I'm going to fuck them," wrote Zuckerberg to a friend. "Probably in the ear." The twins got their money, but then they believed they were duped again by an unfairly low evaluation of their stock. They began a second round of lawsuits for $180 million. There was even talk about the Supreme Court. It reeked of opportunism. But they wouldn't let it go. In interviews, they came across as insolent and splenetic, tossing their rattles out of the pram. It wasn't about the money, they said at the time, it was about fairness, reality, justice. Most people thought it was about some further agile fuckery, this time in Zuckerberg's ear.
There are many ways to tell the story, but perhaps the most penetrating version is that they weren't screwed so much by Zuckerberg as they were by their eventual portrayal in the film version of their lives. They appeared querulous and sulky, exactly the type of characters that America, peeling off the third-degree burns of the great recession, needed to hate. While the rest of the country worried about mounting debt and vanishing jobs, they were out there drinking champagne from, at the very least, Manolo stilettos. The truth would never get in the way of a good story. In Aaron Sorkin's world, and on just about every Web site, the blueblood trust-fund boys got what was coming to them. And the best thing now was for them to take their Facebook money and turn the corner, quickly, away, down toward whatever river would whisk them away.
Armie Hammer brilliantly portrayed them as the bluest of bloods in The Social Network. When the twins are questioned about those times now, they lean back a little in their seats, as if they've just lost a long race, a little perplexed that they came off as the victims of Hollywood's ability to throw an image, while the whole rip-roaring regatta still goes on behind them. "They put us in a box," says Cameron, "caricatured to a point where we didn't really exist." He glances around the bar, drums his finger against the glass. "That's fair enough. I understand that impulse." They smart a little when they hear Zuckerberg's name. "I don't think Mark liked being called an asshole," says Tyler, with a flick of bluster in his eyes, but then he catches himself. "You know, maybe Mark doesn't care. He's a bit of a statesman now, out there connecting the world. I have nothing against him. He's a smart guy."
These are men who've been taught, or have finally taught themselves, to tell their story rather than be told by it. But underneath the calm—just like underneath the boat—one can sense the churn.
They say the word—ath-letes—as if it were a country where pain is the passport. One of the things the brothers mention over and over again is that you can spontaneously crack a rib while rowing, just from the sheer exertion of the muscles hauling on the rib cage.
Along came bitcoin.
At its most elemental, bitcoin is a virtual currency. It's the sort of thing a five-year-old can understand—It's just e-cash, Mom—until he reaches eighteen and he begins to question the deep future of what money really means. It is a currency without government. It doesn't need a banker. It doesn't need a bank. It doesn't even need a brick to be built upon. Its supporters say that it bypasses the Man. It is less than a decade old and it has already come through its own Wild West, a story rooted in uncharted digital territory, up from the dust, an evening redness in the arithmetical West.
These are men who've been taught, or have finally taught themselves, to tell their story rather than be told by it. Bitcoin appeared in 2008—westward ho!—a little dot on the horizon of the Internet. It was the brainchild of a computer scientist named Satoshi Nakamoto. The first sting in the tale is that—to this very day—nobody knows who Nakamoto is, where he lives, or how much of his own invention he actually owns. He could be Californian, he could be Australian, he could even be a European conglomerate, but it doesn't really matter, since what he created was a cryptographic system that is borderless and supposedly unbreakable.
In the beginning the currency was ridiculed and scorned. It was money created from ones and zeros. You either bought it or you had to "mine" for it. If you were mining, your computer was your shovel. Any nerd could do it. You keyed your way in. By using your computer to help check and confirm the bitcoin transactions of others, you made coin. Everyone in this together. The computer heated up and mined, down down down, into the mathematical ground, lifting up numbers, making and breaking camp every hour or so until you had your saddlebags full of virtual coin. It all seemed a bit of a lark at first. No sheriff, no deputy, no central bank. The only saloon was a geeky chat room where a few dozen bitcoiners gathered to chew data.
Lest we forget, money was filthy in 2008.
The collapse was coming. The banks were shorting out. The real estate market was a confederacy of dunces. Bernie Madoff's shadow loomed. Occupy was on the horizon. And all those Wall Street yahoos were beginning to squirm.
Along came bitcoin like some Jesse James of the financial imagination. It was the biggest disruption of money since coins. Here was an idea that could revolutionize the financial world. A communal articulation of a new era. Fuck American Express. Fuck Western Union. Fuck Visa. Fuck the Fed. Fuck the Treasury. Fuck the deregulated thievery of the twenty-first century.
To the earliest settlers, bitcoin suggested a moral way out. It was a money created from the ground up, a currency of the people, by the people, for the people, with all government control extinguished. It was built on a solid base of blockchain technology where everyone participated in the protection of the code. It attracted anarchists, libertarians, whistle-blowers, cypherpunks, economists, extropians, geeks, upstairs, downstairs, left-wing, right-wing. Sure, it could be used by businesses and corporations, but it could also be used by poor people and immigrants to send money home, instantly, honestly, anonymously, without charge, with a click of the keyboard. Everyone in the world had access to your transaction, but nobody had to know your name. It bypassed the suits. All you needed to move money was a phone or a computer. It was freedom of economic action, a sort of anarchy at its democratic best, no rulers, just rules.
Bitcoin, to the original explorers, was a safe pass through the government-occupied valleys: Those assholes were up there in the hills, but they didn't have any scopes on their rifles, and besides, bitcoin went through in communal wagons at night.
Ordinary punters took a shot. Businesses, too. You could buy silk ties in Paris without any extra bank charges. You could protect your money in Buenos Aires without fear of a government grab.
The Winklevoss twins leave the U.S. Court of Appeals in 2011, after appearing in court to ask that the previous settlement case against Facebook be voided. GETTY But freedom can corrupt as surely as power. It was soon the currency that paid for everything illegal under the sun, the go-to money of the darknet. The westward ho! became the outlaw territory of Silk Road and beyond. Heroin through the mail. Cocaine at your doorstep. Child porn at a click. What better way for terrorists to ship money across the world than through a network of anonymous computers? Hezbollah, the Taliban, the Mexican cartels. In Central America, kidnappers began demanding ransom in bitcoin—there was no need for the cash to be stashed under a park bench anymore. Now everything could travel down the wire. Grab, gag, and collect. Uranium could be paid for in bitcoin. People, too. The sex trade was turned on: It was a perfect currency for Madame X. For the online gambling sites, bitcoin was pure jackpot.
For a while, things got very shady indeed. Over a couple years, the rate pinballed between $10 and $1,200 per bitcoin, causing massive waves and troughs of online panic and greed. (In recent times, it has begun to stabilize between $350 and $450.) In 2014, it was revealed that hackers had gotten into the hot wallet of Mt. Gox, a bitcoin exchange based in Tokyo. A total of 850,000 coins were "lost," at an estimated value of almost half a billion dollars. The founder of Silk Road, Ross William Ulbricht (known as "Dread Pirate Roberts"), got himself a four-by-six room in a federal penitentiary for life, not to mention pending charges for murder-for-hire in Maryland.
Everyone thought that bitcoin was the problem. The fact of the matter was, as it so often is, human nature was the problem. Money means desire. Desire means temptation. Temptation means that people get hurt.
During the first Gold Rush in the late 1840s, the belief was that all you needed was a pan and a decent pair of boots and a good dose of nerve and you could go out and make yourself a riverbed millionaire. Even Jack London later fell for the lure of it alongside thousands of others: the western test of manhood and the promise of wealth. What they soon found out was that a single egg could cost twenty-five of today's dollars, a pound of coffee went for a hundred, and a night in a whorehouse could set you back $6,000.
A few miners hit pay dirt, but what most ended up with for their troubles was a busted body and a nasty dose of syphilis.
The gold was discovered on the property of John Sutter in Sacramento, but the one who made the real cash was a neighboring merchant, Samuel Brannan. When Brannan heard the news of the gold nuggets, he bought up all the pickaxes and shovels he could find, filled a quinine bottle with gold dust, and went to San Francisco. Word went around like a prayer in a flash flood: gold gold gold. Brannan didn't wildcat for gold himself, but at the peak of the rush he was flogging $5,000 worth of shovels a day—that's $155,000 today—and went on to become the wealthiest man in California, alongside the Wells Fargo crew, Levi Strauss, and the Studebaker family, who sold wheelbarrows.
If you comb back through the Winklevoss family, you will find a great-grandfather and a great-great-grandfather who knew a thing or two about digging: They worked side by side in the coal mines of Pennsylvania. They didn't go west and they didn't get rich, but maybe the lesson became part of their DNA: Sometimes it's the man who sells the shovels who ends up hitting gold.
Like it or not—and many people don't like it—the Winklevoss brothers are shaping up to be the Samuel Brannans of the bitcoin world.
Nine months after being portrayed in The Social Network, the Winklevoss twins were back out on the water at the World Rowing Cup. CHRISTOPHER LEE/GETTY They heard about it first poolside in Ibiza, Spain. Later it would play into the idea of ease and privilege: umbrella drinks and girls in bikinis. But if the creation myth was going to be flippant, the talk was serious. "I'd say we were cautious, but we were definitely intrigued," says Cameron. They went back home to New York and began to read. There was something about it that got under their skin. "We knew that money had been so broken and inefficient for years," says Tyler, "so bitcoin appealed to us right away."
They speak in braided sentences, catching each other, reassuring themselves, tightening each other's ideas. They don't quite want to say that bitcoin looked like something that might be redemptive—after all, they, like everyone else, were looking to make money, lots of it, Olympic-sized amounts—but they say that it did strike an idealistic chord inside them. They certainly wouldn't be cozying up to the anarchists anytime soon, but this was a global currency that, despite its uncertainties, seemed to present a solution to some of the world's more pressing problems. "It was borderless, instantaneous, irreversible, decentralized, with virtually no transaction costs," says Tyler. It could possibly cut the banks out, and it might even take the knees out from under the credit-card companies. Not only that, but the price, at just under ten dollars per coin, was in their estimation low, very low. They began to snap it up.
They were aware, even at the beginning, that they might, once again, be called Johnny-come-latelys, just hopping blithely on the bandwagon—it was 2012, already four years into the birth of the currency—but they went ahead anyway, power ten. Within a short time they'd spent $11 million buying up a whopping 1 percent of the world's bitcoin, a position they kept up as more bitcoins were mined, making their 1 percent holding today worth about $66 million.
But bitcoin was flammable. The brothers felt the burn quickly. Their next significant investment came later that year, when they gave $1.5 million in venture funding to a nascent exchange called BitInstant. Within a year the CEO was arrested for laundering drug money through the exchange.
So what were a pair of smart, clean-cut Olympic rowers doing hanging around the edges of something so apparently shady, and what, if anything, were they going to do about it?
They mightn't have thought of it this way, but there was something of the sheriff striding into town, the one with the swagger and the scar, glancing up at the balconies as he comes down Main Street, all tumbleweeds and broken pianos. This place was a dump in most people's eyes, but the sheriff glimpsed his last best shot at finally getting the respect he thinks he deserves.
The money shot: A good stroke will catch the water almost without breaking its seal. You stir without rippling. Your silence is sinewy. There's muscle in that calm. The violence catches underneath, thrusts the boat along. Stroke after stroke. Just keep going. Today's truth dies tomorrow. What you have to do is elemental enough. You row without looking behind you. You keep the others in front of you. As long as you can see what they're doing, it's all in your hands. You are there to out-pain them. Doesn't matter who they are, where they come from, how they got here. Know your enemy through yourself. Push through toward pull. Find the still point of this pain. Cut a melody in the disk of your flesh. The only terror comes when they pass you—if they ever pass you.
There are no suits or ties, but there is a white hum in the offices of Gemini in the Flatiron District. The air feels as if it has been brushed clean. There is something so everywhereabout the place. Ergonomic chairs. iPhone portals. Rows of flickering computers. Not so much a hush around the room as a quiet expectation. Eight, nine people. Programmers, analysts, assistants. Other employees—teammates, they call them—dialing in from Portland, Oregon, and beyond.
The brothers fire up the room when they walk inside. A fist-pump here, a shoulder touch there. At the same time, there is something almost shy about them. Apart, they seem like casual visitors to the space they inhabit. It is when they're together that they feel fully shaped. One can't imagine them being apart from each other for very long.
The Winklevoss twins speak onstage at Bitcoin! Let's Cut Through the Noise Already at SXSW in 2016. GETTY They move from desk to desk. The price goes up, the price goes down. The phones ring. The e-mails beep. Customer-service calls. Questions about fees. Inquiries about tax structures.
Gemini was started in late 2015 as a next-generation bitcoin exchange. It is not the first such exchange in the world by any means, but it is one of the most watched. The company is designed with ordinary investors in mind, maybe a hedge fund, maybe a bank: all those people who used to be confused or even terrified by the word bitcoin. It is insured. It is clean. What's so fascinating about this venture is that the brothers are risking themselves by trying to eliminate risk: keeping the boat steady and exploding through it at the same time.
It is when they're together that they feel fully shaped. One can't imagine them being apart from each other for very long. For the past couple years, the Winklevosses have worked closely with just about every compliance agency imaginable. They ticked off all the regulatory boxes. Essentially they wanted to ease all the Debting Thomases. They put regulatory frameworks in place. Security and bankability and insurance were their highest objectives. Nobody was going to be able to blow open the safe. They wanted to soothe all the appetites for risk. They told Bitcoin Magazine they were asking for "permission, not forgiveness."
This is where bitcoin can become normal—that is, if you want bitcoin to be normal.
Just a mile or two down the road, in Soho, a half dozen bitcoiners gather at a meetup. The room is scruffy, small, boxy. A half mannequin is propped on a table, a scarf draped around it. It's the sort of place that twenty years ago would have been full of cigarette smoke. There's a bit of Allen Ginsberg here, a touch of Emma Goldman, a lot of Zuccotti Park. The wine is free and the talk is loose. These are the true believers. They see bitcoin in its clearest possible philosophical terms—the frictionless currency of the people, changing the way people move money around the world, bypassing the banks, disrupting the status quo.
A comedy show is being run out in the backyard. A scruffy young man wanders in and out, announcing over and over again that he is half-baked. A well-dressed Asian girl sidles up to the bar. She looks like she's just stepped out of an NYU business class. She's interested in discovering what bitcoin is. She is regaled by a series of convivial answers. The bartender tells her that bitcoin is a remaking of the prevailing power structures. The girl asks for another glass of wine. The bartender adds that bitcoin is democracy, pure and straight. She nods and tells him that the wine tastes like cooking oil. He laughs and says it wasn't bought with bitcoin. "I don't get it," she says. And so the evening goes, presided over by Margaux Avedisian, who describes herself as the queen of bitcoin. Avedisian, a digital-currency consultant of Armenian descent, is involved in several high-level bitcoin projects. She has appeared in documentaries and on numerous panels. She is smart, sassy, articulate.
When the talk turns to the Winklevoss brothers, the bar turns dark. Someone, somewhere, reaches up to take all the oxygen out of the air. Avedisian leans forward on the counter, her eyes shining, delightful, raged.
"The Winklevii are not the face of bitcoin," she says. "They're jokes. They don't know what they're saying. Nobody in our community respects them. They're so one-note. If you look at their exchange, they have no real volume, they never will. They keep throwing money at different things. Nobody cares. They're not part of us. They're just hangers-on."
"Ah, they're just assholes," the bartender chimes in.
"What they want to do," says Avedisian, "is lobotomize bitcoin, make it into something entirely vapid. They have no clue."
The Asian girl leaves without drinking her third glass of free wine. She's got a totter in her step. She doesn't quite get the future of money, but then again maybe very few in the world do.
Giving testimony on bitcoin licensing before the New York State Department of Financial Services in 2014. LUCAS JACKSON/REUTERS The future of money might look like this: You're standing on Oxford Street in London in winter. You think about how you want to get to Charing Cross Road. The thought triggers itself through electrical signals into the chip embedded in your wrist. Within a moment, a driverless car pulls up on the sensor-equipped road. The door opens. You hop in. The car says hello. You tell it to shut up. It does. It already knows where you want to go. It turns onto Regent Street. You think,A little more air-conditioning, please. The vents blow. You think, Go a little faster, please. The pace picks up. You think, This traffic is too heavy, use Quick(TM). The car swings down Glasshouse Street. You think, Pay the car in front to get out of my way. It does. You think, Unlock access to a shortcut. The car turns down Sherwood Street to Shaftsbury Avenue. You pull in to Charing Cross. You hop out. The car says goodbye. You tell it to shut up again. You run for the train and the computer chip in your wrist pays for the quiet-car ticket for the way home.
All of these transactions—the air-conditioning, the pace, the shortcut, the bribe to get out of the way, the quick lanes, the ride itself, the train, maybe even the "shut up"—will cost money. As far as crypto-currency enthusiasts think, it will be paid for without coins, without phones, without glass screens, just the money coming in and going out of your preprogrammed wallet embedded beneath your skin.
The Winklevosses are betting that the money will be bitcoin. And that those coins will flow through high-end, corporate-run exchanges like Gemini rather than smoky SoHo dives.
Cameron leans across a table in a New York diner, the sort of place where you might want to polish your fork just in case, and says: "The future is here, it's just not evenly distributed yet." He can't remember whom the quote belongs to, but he freely acknowledges that it's not his own. Theirs is a truculent but generous intelligence, capable of surprise and turn at the oddest of moments. They talk meditation, they talk economics, they talk Van Halen, they talk, yes, William Gibson, but everything comes around again to bitcoin.
"The key to all this is that people aren't even going to know that they're using bitcoin," says Tyler. "It's going to be there, but it's not going to be exposed to the end user. Bitcoin is going to be the rails that underpin our payment systems. It's just like an IP address. We don't log on to a series of numbers, 115.425.5 or whatever. No, we log on to Google.com. In the same way, bitcoin is going to be disguised. There will be a body kit that makes it user-friendly. That's what makes bitcoin a kick-ass currency."
Any fool can send a billion dollars across the world—as long as they have it, of course—but it's virtually impossible to send a quarter unless you stick it in an envelope and pay forty-nine cents for a stamp. It's one of the great ironies of our antiquated money system. And yet the quark of the financial world is essentially the small denomination. What bitcoin promises is that it will enable people and businesses to send money in just about any denomination to one another, anywhere in the world, for next to nothing. A public address, a private key, a click of the mouse, and the money is gone.
A Bitcoin conference in New York City in 2014. GETTY This matters. This matters a lot. Credit-card companies can't do this. Neither can the big banks under their current systems. But Marie-Louise on the corner of Libertador Avenue can. And so can Pat Murphy in his Limerick housing estate. So can Mark Andreessen and Bill Gates and Laurene Powell Jobs. Anyone can do it, anywhere in the world, at virtually no charge.
You can do it, in fact, from your phone in a diner in New York. But the whole time they are there—over identical California omelettes that they order with an ironic shrug—they never once open their phones. They come across more like the talkative guys who might buy you a drink at the sports bar than the petulants ordering bottle service in the VIP corner. The older they get, the more comfortable they seem in their contradictions: the competition, the ease; the fame, the quiet; the gamble, the sure thing.
Bitcoin is what might eventually make them among the richest men in America. And yet. There is always a yet. What seems indisputable about the future of money, to the Winklevosses and other bitcoin adherents, is that the technology that underpins bitcoin—the blockchain—will become one of the fundamental tenets of how we deal with the world of finance. Blockchain is the core computer code. It's open source and peer to peer—in other words, it's free and open to you and me. Every single bitcoin transaction ever made goes to an open public ledger. It would take an unprecedented 51 percent attack—where one entity would come to control more than half of the computing power used to mine bitcoin—for hackers to undo it. The blockchain is maintained by computers all around the world, and its future sidechains will create systems that deal with contracts and stock and other payments. These sidechains could very well be the foundation of the new global economy for the big banks, the credit-card companies, and even government itself.
"It's boundless," says Cameron.
This is what the brothers are counting on—and what might eventually make them among the richest men in America.
And yet. There is always a yet.
When you delve into the world of bitcoin, it gets deeper, darker, more mysterious all the time. Why has its creator remained anonymous? Why did he drop off the face of the earth? How much of it does he own himself? Will banks and corporations try to bring the currency down? Why are there really only five developers with full "commit access" to the code (not the Winklevosses, by the way)? Who is really in charge of the currency's governance?
Perhaps the most pressing issue at hand is that of scaling, which has caused what amounts to a civil war among followers. A maximum block size of one megabyte has been imposed on the chain, sort of like a built-in artificial dampener to keep bitcoin punk rock. That's not nearly enough capacity for the number of transactions that would take place in future visions. In years to come, there could be massive backlogs and outages that could create instant financial panic. Bitcoin's most influential leaders are haggling over what will happen. Will bitcoin maintain its decentralized status, or will it go legit and open up to infinite transactions? And if it goes legit, where's the punk?
The issues are ongoing—and they might very well take bitcoin down, but the Winklevosses don't think so. They have seen internal disputes before. They've refrained from taking a public stance mostly because they know that there are a lot of other very smart people in bitcoin who are aware that crisis often builds consensus. "We're in this for the long haul," says Tyler. "We're the first batter in the first inning."
GILLIAN LAUB The waiter comes across and asks them, bizarrely, if they're twins. They nod politely. Who was born first? They've heard it a million times and their answer is always the same: Neither of them—they were born cesarean. Cameron looks older, says the waiter. Tyler grins. Normally it's the other way around, says Cameron, grinning back. Do you ever fight? asks the waiter. Every now and then, they say. But not over this, not over the future.
Heraclitus was wrong. You can, in fact, step in the same river twice. In the beginning you went to the shed. No electricity there, no heat, just a giant tub where you simulated the river. You could only do eleven strokes. But there was something about the repetition, the difference, even the monotony, that hooked you. After a while it wasn't an abandoned shed anymore. College gyms, national training centers. Bigger buildings. High ceilings. AC. Doctors and trainers. Monitors hooked up to your heart, your head, your blood. Six foot five, but even then you were not as tall as the other guys. You liked the notion of underdog. Everyone called you the opposite. The rich kids. The privileged ones. To hell with that. They don't know us, who we are, where we came from. Some of the biggest chips rest on the shoulders of those with the least to lose. Six foot five times two makes just about thirteen feet. You sit in the erg and you stare ahead. Day in, day out. One thousand strokes, two thousand. You work with the very best. You even train with the Navy SEALs. It touches that American part of you. The sentiment, the false optimism. When the oil fields are burning, you even think, I'll go there with them. But you stay in the boat. You want that other flag rising. That's what you aim for. You don't win but you get close. Afterward there are planes, galas, regattas, magazine spreads, but you always come back to that early river. The cold. The fierceness. The heron. Like it or not, you're never going to get off the water—that's just the fact of the matter, it's always going to be there. Hard to admit it, but once you were wrong. You got out of the boat and you haggled over who made it. You lost that one, hard. You might lose this one, too, but then again it just might be the original arc that you're stepping toward. So you return, then. You rise before dark. You drag your carcass along Broadway before dawn.
All the rich men in the world want to get shot into outer space. Richard Branson. Jeff Bezos. Elon Musk. The new explorers. To get the hell out of here and see if they—and maybe we—can exist somewhere else for a while. It's the story of the century. We want to know if the pocket of the universe can be turned inside out. We're either going to bring all the detritus of the world upward with us or we're going to find a brand-new way to exist. The cynical say that it's just another form of colonization—they're probably right, but then again maybe it's our only way out.
The Winklevosses have booked their tickets—numbers 700 and 701—on Branson's Virgin Galactic. Although they go virtually everywhere together, the twins want to go on different flights because of the risk involved: Now that they're in their mid-thirties, they can finally see death, or at least its rumor. It's a boy's adventure, but it's also the outer edge of possibility. It cost a quarter of a million dollars per seat, and they paid for it, yes, in bitcoin.
Of course, up until recently, the original space flights all splashed down into the sea. One of the ships that hauled the Gemini space capsule out of the water in 1965 was the Intrepid aircraft carrier.
The Winklevosses no longer pull their boat up the river. Instead they often run five miles along the Hudson to the Intrepid and back. The destroyer has been parked along Manhattan's West Side for almost as long as they have been alive. It's now a museum. The brothers like the boat, its presence, its symbolism: Intrepid, Gemini, the space shot.
They ease into the run.
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Weekly Roundup

News roundup for the previous week.
In International news
  1. China’s ‘New Silk Roads’ Reach Latin America
  2. #ChineseAmerican figure skater Nathan Chen wins praise for boldness in PyeongChang: "As I got older, there were more and more Asian kids at competitions that I was going to - that felt cool to me," Chen added, hopes that he too, like his early inspiration, Michelle Kwan, can inspire a new generation
  3. Duterte wants to create ‘balance’ by sending troops to China for training. Mr Duterte said there was a need to “balance” the training of Filipino soldiers, who have a strong bond with the United States military
  4. US National Space Council discusses space threats and opportunities reportedly posed by China
  5. China swept both men's and women's titles at the 2018 ITTF_Team World Cup after beating Japan twice in the finals… "
  6. #Nepal to Deepen Ties with China to Get More Leverage in Dealings with India: Nepal's new Prime Minister K P Oli has said he wants to deepen ties with China to explore more options and get more leverage in his dealings with India "in keeping with the times"
  7. Singapore and China work to boost Chongqing's connectivity
  8. Does anybody know more about the "Ethnic Chinese" ID Card that the government plans to implement for overseas Chinese?
  9. China is now offering a 5-year visa for foreigners of Chinese descend... Has anyone applied for this?
  10. China calls for direct dialogue between DPRK and U.S.
  11. China's peacekeeping force in Mali awarded the Peace Medal of Honor by the UN
  12. Eurasia high speed railway from Germany to China can be built by 2026
  13. CGTN Wang Guan on Confucius Institutes and Chinese students being threats: "Now is some hardliners final attempt to contain a rising ethnic Asian society"
  14. “The UK Is Not a Safe Place” – Concerns over Second Chinese Female Student Reported Missing in London
  15. India Turns to China-Based AIIB for Loans to Fund its Infrastructure Dream
  16. US Slams, China Praises Pakistan's Counterterror Efforts
  17. Parents of Chinese student killed by British driver reject not-guilty verdict
  18. Duterte Allies Seek to Emulate China’s Anti-Poverty Programs
  19. Philippines says in talks with China state firm on joint sea exploration
  20. Beijing blasts Western critics who ‘smear China’ with the term sharp power. Advisory body spokesman says some Westerners are ‘stuck in the cold war era’
  21. Tragedy far from home: Chinese students who went missing abroad
  22. Ng On-yee: #Snooker's new world number one. Has just become the first Asian woman to top the World Ladies Billiards and Snooker (WLBS) rankings. The fact that her father was an amateur player and worked at a local snooker parlour meant that she could train there for free
  23. A Chinese initiative is setting the pace in retail
  24. Trump risks more than a trade war by targeting China
  25. Russia, China agree joint data center for lunar projects & deep space exploration
  26. UCLA players release from China secured before Trump got involved
  27. China denies using citizens overseas to project influence abroad. Senior official says history and contributions of overseas Chinese should be recognised, not ‘slandered or belittled’
  28. Documentary film ‘Abacus: Small Enough to Jail’ nominated for Oscar. A documentary about a Chinese underdog, which took on the US government, is the story of a family-owned bank in New York’s Chinatown – the only bank prosecuted following the financial crisis 10 years ago
  29. Trump on China abolishing term limits: 'Maybe we'll give that a shot'
In Domestic news
  1. Proposed constitutional amendment would grant more Chinese cities legislative power
  2. Proposal to abolish term limit for president could buy more time to pursue reforms
  3. More women, farmers and workers, but fewer officials will sit on China's top legislature, as election results for the new NPC were approved. The new lineup has 742 women, 24.9% of the total, up 1.5%. A total of 468 deputies are workers and farmers. Their share has grown by 2.28% to 15.7%
  4. Funding Infrastructure: Why China Is Running Circles Around America
  5. Elon Musk: China’s progress in advanced infrastructure is 100 times faster than the US
  6. Taiwan is gearing up for a independence referendum (possible official name change)
  7. China’s Brain Drain Is Ending. Officials say they are seeing a payoff from their investments in higher education.
  8. China media makes war threat over U.S. Taiwan bill
  9. China vows deeper friendship with Taiwan amid tensions
  10. What Do China’s Democratic Parties Actually Do?. The CCP is not China’s only political party. Here’s a closer look at the role and function of the other eight
  11. Back from the brink: 8 endangered species inching away from extinction in China
  12. China's C919 large passenger aircraft has received 30 new orders from a domestic leasing company, taking total orders to 815
In SciTech news
  1. Hisense 150" 4K 'Laser TV'震撼CES 2018; 欲进军OLED市场
  2. Does China Control The EV Revolution?
  3. Daimler's Chinese billionaire investor Li Shufu wants its electric car technology
  4. Huawei announces Balong 5G01, first commercially available 5G chipset
  5. China's hypersonic aircraft would fly from Beijing to New York in two hours. The double-wing plane just aced wind tunnel tests at speeds of nearly 5,600 miles per hour
  6. China spends $279 bln on R&D in 2017: science minister
  7. Meet the female engineers and managers of China's space program: The space program looks like it should be a geeky boy's dream. But in China, a large portion of the sector is controlled by female technicians
  8. Watch out America, China's A.I is getting smarter!
  9. #AI sector sees big investment, financing in 2017: received about 180 billion yuan (28 billion U.S. dollars) of investment and financing last year
  10. Alibaba Cloud steps up its game as it offers #quantum computing service
  11. Huawei Mate 10 Pro Showcase - CES 2018
  12. Mine It to the Limit! Chinese Firm Makes Billions From #Cryptocurrency. Bitmain managed to take this activity to a whole new level by raking in more money last year than Nvidia. Bernstein estimates that Bitmain currently has an estimated “70 to 80 percent of market share in bitcoin miners and ASICs”
  13. Chinese scientists develop #AI system to diagnose human diseases: The tool may ultimately aid in expediting the diagnosis and referral of these treatable conditions, thereby facilitating earlier treatment and resulting in improved clinical outcomes
  14. China’s government aims to raise as much as 200 billion yuan ($31.5 billion) to invest in homegrown chip companies and accelerate its ambition of building a world-class semiconductor industry
  15. Get your food served by a robot at restaurants on SW China's rest stops: The smart tables can do much more than help you order food. It can be a game machine, a tour guide or even an e-commerce platform
  16. Huawei MateBook X Pro Hands-On at MWC 2018
  17. Huawei's AI phone tested by driving car at dog
  18. Vivo Apex Concept Phone hands-on
  19. Legit Chinese Brand GPUs? Hands on with the Yeston 3GB GTX 1060
  20. Apple is under fire for moving iCloud data to China
  21. China testing 400km/h "maglev" trains
  22. China to recruit ‘civilian astronauts’
In Economic news
  1. China's Fosun buys majority stake in French luxury brand #Lanvin: The French fashion house was established in 1889. Currently, Lanvin operates in more than 50 countries with women's wear, menswear, children's wear and accessories including footwear and leather goods
  2. China Gives Australia’s Number Two Gas Producer A Boost
  3. #Xiaomi hopes to boost global market sales with new Microsoft agreement: The new strategic contract will see the two companies working together on cloud computing, AI and new equipment for notebook computers
  4. Even the World Bank is starting to take notice: China’s ‘unprecedented poverty reduction’ and the role of the CPC
  5. Tech Mogul Gets $13 Billion Richer Just by Leaving New York for China
  6. Chinese investment flowing out to healthcare. This is what they're looking for.
  7. China's #BYD named No. 2 on list of World's Top 10 Most Innovative Companies in energy: BYD ranked No. 2 for "introducing the first electric trucks," according to the rankings compiled by the Fast Company, a monthly American business magazine
  8. China’s per capita disposable income up 9.0 percent in 2017
  9. China Contributed 30% to Global Economic Growth in 2017
  10. Tencent chief 'Pony' Ma is now China's richest man, doubling his wealth to $47 billion last year
  11. China becomes Vietnam's top export market in first two months of 2018
  12. Russia remains China's top oil supplier as pipeline expands
  13. dotard declares steel trade war against china..... and shoots himself in the foot
  14. Trump Roars; China Yawns - Steel tariffs are only going to hurt one country's economy.
  15. China is quickly becoming the dominant force in startups
  16. China vows to work with other nations to counter Trump tariffs
In Military news
  1. China aims for nuclear-powered aircraft carrier by 2025
  2. J-16 fighter jet video released by PLA Air Force
  3. Chinese military #drone sales hover over Middle East: Defence analysts believe that the drone, the Wing Loong II, is now being used by the United Arab Emirates military while the UAE remains barred from buying weaponised drones from the United States
  4. China's Ready For War: China's Military Capabilities 2018
  5. PLA's Lego Grenade (The scalable offensive hand grenade)
  6. As US loses ground in Mideast, the stage is set for China and Russia to mull military alliance with Iran
Other Notables
  1. Tencent Employees line up "旺"字 outside of HQ building to get red envelopes, CEO 马化腾发钱发到手软
  2. WeChat Users sent 0.688 billion Red Envelopes in a single day (Feb. 15th, average about 8000 Red Envelopes sent per second)!One user sent the most number that day, 1203 Red Envelopes
  3. The Western Hypocrisy in Academic /Classroom freedom: Chinese students being reported to their parents in China about their pro-Western opinions is "disturbing" "spying" and "censorship", while Western media have been rampantly investigating Chinese students as "spies" for their pro-China views
  4. Considering the amendment of Presidential term limits in a geopolitical context
  5. What are some Sino approved documentaries?
  6. CHINA MAC ft. JEZZ GASOLINE "MAC TALK" TEASER # 1 DIRECTED BY MO KNOWLEDGE
  7. China doesn’t care about your opinion
  8. CGTN: Do Chinese students in US threaten US security?
  9. If the US didn’t pass the 22nd Amendment, they’d still have Slick Willy. And would that be such a terrible thing?
  10. Anyone in the know about the status of cryonics in China?
  11. With all the talk about the President term limits possibly being removed, what is happening with the retirement age rule?
  12. ‘Put out your cigarette or leave China,’ commuters confront foreigner smoking on Beijing subway
  13. Higher Brothers x HARIKIRI - Nothing Wrong
  14. 10 Misconceptions Everyone Believes About China (Generally pretty accurate)
  15. Boost Your Vocab with This Catchy Song-The King asked me to patrol the mountains
  16. Footage discovered showing mass grave for wartime 'comfort women'
  17. Forget all you read on Western propaganda about the Tiananmen incident. Video debunks Western claims of PLA shooting peaceful demonstrators
  18. So what would happen to Logan Paul if he disrespected China/Chinese people like he did in Japan?
  19. Q&A with CGTN chief reporter Wang Guan
  20. Exquisite ice sculptures decorate Harbin
  21. #NBA powerhouse Cleveland Cavaliers @cavs celebrate Chinese #LunarNewYear at home game against @BrooklynNets
  22. Why China Is Running Circles Around America
  23. Can this subreddit please differentiate between the DPP and the KMT?
  24. How the West got China wrong
  25. [XD] Story confirmed by official source: Picture shows Jack Ma between two police officiers!
  26. No Matter What the Western Propaganda Says, Chinese Democracy is Alive and Well!
  27. End of Chinese Emperors (221 BCE — 1911 CE) - from Fairbank Center's China Questions book
  28. Instant Pot Beef & Vegetables Congee Rice Poridge (Jook or Juk)
  29. Traditional Chinese hanfu | Ming dynasty fashion by 清辉阁
  30. 2012新年综合晚会选编_合唱《没有共产党就没有新中国》【高清720P】 - YouTube
  31. The Husband Tag! 夫妻默契大考驗!
  32. Chinese President Xi Jinping: What Is His Background?
  33. China's box offices pulled in more than 10 billion yuan (US$1.594 billion) in February, reaching a new high for the Chinese film industry as well as setting a new world record
  34. The West is starting to use feminists like Leta Hong Fincher to destabilize Chinese society. Thoughts?
  35. More black and white stills for Zhang Yimou’s period wuxia film Shadow
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Alex Winter On The Deep Web, Silk Road and the Dread ... The Dark Side Of The Silk Road - YouTube Silk Road Case: The Real, Untold Story - YouTube Bitcoin: Beyond The Bubble - Full Documentary - YouTube The Death of Silk Road and the Use of BitCoin

Enjoying its world premiere at SXSW earlier in the week, Alex Winter’s Silk Road documentary Deep Web was only completed a couple of days before the festival. With millions in cryptocurrency Bitcoin (BTC) lost over the weekend, Winter’s doc surrounding the Ross Ulbricht case and the original Silk Road is more relevant than ever, largely because it addresses the real danger facing dark net ... Alex Winter Documentary Will Go Inside the World of Bitcoin, Silk Road submitted by unigami to Bitcoin [link] [comments] In addition, transactions on Silk Road could only be made using bitcoin, which, although not entirely anonymous, offered a level of anonymity far greater than any other form of currency or credit card transactions would have enabled. On November 26, a new Silk Road video was published that reveals underreported and never-before-seen information. The film called the “Silk Road Case: The Real, Untold Story” contains over 400 ... Deep Web is the untold story of bitcoin, the Silk Road, and the dark corners of the “deep web.” The documentary film offers an exclusive look into the Ulbricht family and the infamous online black market that has become one of the most epic legal battles in the history of bitcoin. Also read: Secret Service and DEA Steal Silk Road Bitcoins and Extort Money From Ulbricht. In an attempt to ... What’s more, the $350,000 in bitcoin that Ulbricht had traced to Curtis Green’s account had been stolen, but not by Green. Former Secret Service agent Shaun Bridges had used Green’s identity to steal the money from Silk Road’s account. In addition, he had used Green’s account to steal a further $450,000 from other Silk Road accounts, which he had transferred to his own account.

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Alex Winter On The Deep Web, Silk Road and the Dread ...

Thanks for watching! For donations: Bitcoin - 1CpGMM8Ag8gNYL3FffusVqEBUvHyYenTP8 The silk road has a lot of history as a marketplace but very few people know the full story. In today's deep dive we will take a look into the untold side of... The Silk Road was the largest online black market ever to be created, offering services for drug trade and other illicit goods and services. While it wasn't ... Al Profit and Scott Burnstein talk about the Silk Road case- the website that facilitated drug deals and other crimes using Bitcoin. Ross Ulbricht, founder of Silk Road and known as "Dread Pirate ... Alex Winter rose to prominence in the 1980s, starring in hit films like “Lost Boys” and “Bill and Ted’s Excellent Adventure.” He later turned to writing, pro...

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