Jamie Dimon hated bitcoin. Now JPMorgan is getting ahead ...

Bitcoin mentioned around Reddit: Warren Buffett, Jeff Bezos and Jamie Dimon just spooked health care stocks after announcing they're creating a non-profit health insurance company /r/UpliftingNews

submitted by BitcoinAllBot to BitcoinAll [link] [comments]

10 famous cryptocurrency quotes and what we can learn from them - read and don't look like a fool anymore :P

“If you don’t believe it or don’t get it, I don’t have the time to try to convince you, sorry.” – Satoshi Nakamoto
This is an early quote from Satoshi Nakamoto to the Bitcoin doubters on the forums. Since those early days, a whole industry has been created around his invention. With hindsight, it is easy to say that perhaps people should have listened, but what was created was something entirely unique and therefore difficult for many to understand. A key aspect of this message is that to understand Bitcoin, you need to put the time and effort in to learn on your own. Mistakes can easily be made by trusting unscrupulous actors.
“It’s money 2.0, a huge, huge, huge deal.” – Chamath Palihapitiya, venture capitalist
Chamath Palihapitiya was an early employee at Facebook before moving on and setting up his own investment fund. By 2015, his fund had over $1.1 billion in assets, and he also became a minority shareholder of the Golden State Warriors NBA team. Despite stating he is a disciple of Warren Buffett, they do disagree on the notion of Bitcoin. Palihapitiya is a strong believer in the cryptocurrency. He believes that within the next 20 years, Bitcoin will rise to $1 million.
“It’s a fraud” and “worse than tulip bulbs” – Jamie Dimon, CEO of JP Morgan
Unsurprisingly, the boss of JP Morgan – Jamie Dimon – isn’t much of a fan of Bitcoin. This quote from Mr Dimon in 2017 was spoken during the most recent Bitcoin bubble. Since then however, JP Morgan has announced its own form of cryptocurrency, suggesting the banking titan isn’t as adverse to crypto as the quote suggests. One of Bitcoin’s main aims is to remove the need for such huge banks as JP Morgan, so it is unlikely that Jamie Dimon will ever change his mind.
“Stay away from it. It’s a mirage, basically. In terms of cryptocurrencies, generally, I can say almost with certainty that they will come to a bad ending.” – Warren Buffett, legendary investor
Coming back to the traditional finance sector, the fact that Buffet isn’t a fan of Bitcoin or cryptocurrencies in general is to be expected. Buffett’s fortune has been accumulated through traditional assets and a patient approach. The risk and volatility seen in cryptocurrencies would be an instant warning sign to the famous investor. Buffett has been notoriously adverse to upcoming technology stocks, so a punt on Bitcoin isn’t going to be happening any time soon.
“I do think Bitcoin is the first [encrypted money] that has the potential to do something like change the world.” – Peter Thiel, co-founder of PayPal
Peter Thiel and his team had a similar idea to Bitcoin when in the process of creating PayPal. However, at the time, they were unable to get their idea off the ground. Peter Thiel is now one of the largest venture capitalists in Silicon Valley and a staunch Randian. These two factors should show why he has an interest in Bitcoin.
“Bitcoin actually has the balance and incentives center, and that is why it is starting to take off.” – Julian Assange, founder of Wikileaks
Bitcoin and Wikileaks have a long relationship. Indeed, without Bitcoin, there may not be a Wikileaks as we know it. When the major credit card companies attempted to block payments to Wikileaks, the company asked for donations in Bitcoin instead, which allowed it to survive. Nakamoto was adverse to supporting Wikileaks due to the pressure it would put on the young network. Julian Assange himself is one of the earlier cypherpunks, regularly interacting with members on the CypherPunk mailing list from 1995. Ideas such as Bitcoin were common on the mailing list, so when Bitcoin was finally released, the fact that Wikileaks appropriated it is not surprising.
“The Federal Reserve simply does not have authority to supervise or regulate Bitcoin in any way.” – Janet Yellen, former chair of the US Federal Reserve
Janet Yellen highlights a key aspect of Bitcoin in her quote. Bitcoin is not a US cryptocurrency. Instead, it is the first truly global currency. It isn’t run by anyone in particular, but anyone who wants to get involved can do so. This makes it extremely difficult for the authorities to formulate regulations around Bitcoin. This also makes Bitcoin extremely difficult to stop. Many bans have been rumoured throughout the years, but this has never stopped Bitcoin from progressing.
“Whereas most technologies tend to automate workers on the periphery doing menial tasks, blockchains automate away the center. Instead of putting the taxi driver out of a job, blockchain puts Uber out of a job and lets the taxi drivers work with the customer directly.” – Vitalik Buterin, co-founder of Ethereum
Buterin’s quote recognises the removal of third parties that cryptocurrencies allow for. Instead of a company like Uber or say Dropbox taking a cut of the profits, this can all be managed in a peer-to-peer manner through cryptocurrencies. This increases the profits for you and me, reduces costs, and can help remove some of the largest corporations in the world in the hope of creating a fairer economy.
“I see Bitcoin as ultimately becoming a reserve currency for banks, playing much the same role as gold did in the early days of banking. Banks could issue digital cash with greater anonymity and lighter weight, more efficient transactions.” – Hal Finney
This early quote from Hal Finney shows that he understood the possibilities of Bitcoin from a very early stage. This was helped by the many discussions that took place on the CypherPunk mailing list in the 1990s, whereby digital currencies and issues of privacy were constantly discussed and philosophised.
“Since we’re all rich with Bitcoins … we ought to put some of this unearned wealth to good use.” – Hal Finney
Hal Finney is one of the few people involved in Bitcoin who is liked by everyone. Even Faketoshi has a soft spot for Finney. Sadly, Finney passed away before he could witness the beast that Bitcoin evolved into. Finney was an early contributor to the CypherPunk mailing list like Assange, and was instrumental in helping Bitcoin grow from day one. This quote above highlights what all who have become rich through Bitcoin should do – give back and help others.
submitted by alvarosb to CryptoCurrency [link] [comments]

The Next Crypto Wave: The Rise of Stablecoins and its Entry to the U.S. Dollar Market

The Next Crypto Wave: The Rise of Stablecoins and its Entry to the U.S. Dollar Market

Author: Christian Hsieh, CEO of Tokenomy
This paper examines some explanations for the continual global market demand for the U.S. dollar, the rise of stablecoins, and the utility and opportunities that crypto dollars can offer to both the cryptocurrency and traditional markets.
The U.S. dollar, dominant in world trade since the establishment of the 1944 Bretton Woods System, is unequivocally the world’s most demanded reserve currency. Today, more than 61% of foreign bank reserves and nearly 40% of the entire world’s debt is denominated in U.S. dollars1.
However, there is a massive supply and demand imbalance in the U.S. dollar market. On the supply side, central banks throughout the world have implemented more than a decade-long accommodative monetary policy since the 2008 global financial crisis. The COVID-19 pandemic further exacerbated the need for central banks to provide necessary liquidity and keep staggering economies moving. While the Federal Reserve leads the effort of “money printing” and stimulus programs, the current money supply still cannot meet the constant high demand for the U.S. dollar2. Let us review some of the reasons for this constant dollar demand from a few economic fundamentals.

Demand for U.S. Dollars

Firstly, most of the world’s trade is denominated in U.S. dollars. Chief Economist of the IMF, Gita Gopinath, has compiled data reflecting that the U.S. dollar’s share of invoicing was 4.7 times larger than America’s share of the value of imports, and 3.1 times its share of world exports3. The U.S. dollar is the dominant “invoicing currency” in most developing countries4.

https://preview.redd.it/d4xalwdyz8p51.png?width=535&format=png&auto=webp&s=9f0556c6aa6b29016c9b135f3279e8337dfee2a6

https://preview.redd.it/wucg40kzz8p51.png?width=653&format=png&auto=webp&s=71257fec29b43e0fc0df1bf04363717e3b52478f
This U.S. dollar preference also directly impacts the world’s debt. According to the Bank of International Settlements, there is over $67 trillion in U.S. dollar denominated debt globally, and borrowing outside of the U.S. accounted for $12.5 trillion in Q1 20205. There is an immense demand for U.S. dollars every year just to service these dollar debts. The annual U.S. dollar buying demand is easily over $1 trillion assuming the borrowing cost is at 1.5% (1 year LIBOR + 1%) per year, a conservative estimate.

https://preview.redd.it/6956j6f109p51.png?width=487&format=png&auto=webp&s=ccea257a4e9524c11df25737cac961308b542b69
Secondly, since the U.S. has a much stronger economy compared to its global peers, a higher return on investments draws U.S. dollar demand from everywhere in the world, to invest in companies both in the public and private markets. The U.S. hosts the largest stock markets in the world with more than $33 trillion in public market capitalization (combined both NYSE and NASDAQ)6. For the private market, North America’s total share is well over 60% of the $6.5 trillion global assets under management across private equity, real assets, and private debt investments7. The demand for higher quality investments extends to the fixed income market as well. As countries like Japan and Switzerland currently have negative-yielding interest rates8, fixed income investors’ quest for yield in the developed economies leads them back to the U.S. debt market. As of July 2020, there are $15 trillion worth of negative-yielding debt securities globally (see chart). In comparison, the positive, low-yielding U.S. debt remains a sound fixed income strategy for conservative investors in uncertain market conditions.

Source: Bloomberg
Last, but not least, there are many developing economies experiencing failing monetary policies, where hyperinflation has become a real national disaster. A classic example is Venezuela, where the currency Bolivar became practically worthless as the inflation rate skyrocketed to 10,000,000% in 20199. The recent Beirut port explosion in Lebanon caused a sudden economic meltdown and compounded its already troubled financial market, where inflation has soared to over 112% year on year10. For citizens living in unstable regions such as these, the only reliable store of value is the U.S. dollar. According to the Chainalysis 2020 Geography of Cryptocurrency Report, Venezuela has become one of the most active cryptocurrency trading countries11. The demand for cryptocurrency surges as a flight to safety mentality drives Venezuelans to acquire U.S. dollars to preserve savings that they might otherwise lose. The growth for cryptocurrency activities in those regions is fueled by these desperate citizens using cryptocurrencies as rails to access the U.S. dollar, on top of acquiring actual Bitcoin or other underlying crypto assets.

The Rise of Crypto Dollars

Due to the highly volatile nature of cryptocurrencies, USD stablecoin, a crypto-powered blockchain token that pegs its value to the U.S. dollar, was introduced to provide stable dollar exposure in the crypto trading sphere. Tether is the first of its kind. Issued in 2014 on the bitcoin blockchain (Omni layer protocol), under the token symbol USDT, it attempts to provide crypto traders with a stable settlement currency while they trade in and out of various crypto assets. The reason behind the stablecoin creation was to address the inefficient and burdensome aspects of having to move fiat U.S. dollars between the legacy banking system and crypto exchanges. Because one USDT is theoretically backed by one U.S. dollar, traders can use USDT to trade and settle to fiat dollars. It was not until 2017 that the majority of traders seemed to realize Tether’s intended utility and started using it widely. As of April 2019, USDT trading volume started exceeding the trading volume of bitcoina12, and it now dominates the crypto trading sphere with over $50 billion average daily trading volume13.

https://preview.redd.it/3vq7v1jg09p51.png?width=700&format=png&auto=webp&s=46f11b5f5245a8c335ccc60432873e9bad2eb1e1
An interesting aspect of USDT is that although the claimed 1:1 backing with U.S. dollar collateral is in question, and the Tether company is in reality running fractional reserves through a loose offshore corporate structure, Tether’s trading volume and adoption continues to grow rapidly14. Perhaps in comparison to fiat U.S. dollars, which is not really backed by anything, Tether still has cash equivalents in reserves and crypto traders favor its liquidity and convenience over its lack of legitimacy. For those who are concerned about Tether’s solvency, they can now purchase credit default swaps for downside protection15. On the other hand, USDC, the more compliant contender, takes a distant second spot with total coin circulation of $1.8 billion, versus USDT at $14.5 billion (at the time of publication). It is still too early to tell who is the ultimate leader in the stablecoin arena, as more and more stablecoins are launching to offer various functions and supporting mechanisms. There are three main categories of stablecoin: fiat-backed, crypto-collateralized, and non-collateralized algorithm based stablecoins. Most of these are still at an experimental phase, and readers can learn more about them here. With the continuous innovation of stablecoin development, the utility stablecoins provide in the overall crypto market will become more apparent.

Institutional Developments

In addition to trade settlement, stablecoins can be applied in many other areas. Cross-border payments and remittances is an inefficient market that desperately needs innovation. In 2020, the average cost of sending money across the world is around 7%16, and it takes days to settle. The World Bank aims to reduce remittance fees to 3% by 2030. With the implementation of blockchain technology, this cost could be further reduced close to zero.
J.P. Morgan, the largest bank in the U.S., has created an Interbank Information Network (IIN) with 416 global Institutions to transform the speed of payment flows through its own JPM Coin, another type of crypto dollar17. Although people argue that JPM Coin is not considered a cryptocurrency as it cannot trade openly on a public blockchain, it is by far the largest scale experiment with all the institutional participants trading within the “permissioned” blockchain. It might be more accurate to refer to it as the use of distributed ledger technology (DLT) instead of “blockchain” in this context. Nevertheless, we should keep in mind that as J.P. Morgan currently moves $6 trillion U.S. dollars per day18, the scale of this experiment would create a considerable impact in the international payment and remittance market if it were successful. Potentially the day will come when regulated crypto exchanges become participants of IIN, and the link between public and private crypto assets can be instantly connected, unlocking greater possibilities in blockchain applications.
Many central banks are also in talks about developing their own central bank digital currency (CBDC). Although this idea was not new, the discussion was brought to the forefront due to Facebook’s aggressive Libra project announcement in June 2019 and the public attention that followed. As of July 2020, at least 36 central banks have published some sort of CBDC framework. While each nation has a slightly different motivation behind its currency digitization initiative, ranging from payment safety, transaction efficiency, easy monetary implementation, or financial inclusion, these central banks are committed to deploying a new digital payment infrastructure. When it comes to the technical architectures, research from BIS indicates that most of the current proofs-of-concept tend to be based upon distributed ledger technology (permissioned blockchain)19.

https://preview.redd.it/lgb1f2rw19p51.png?width=700&format=png&auto=webp&s=040bb0deed0499df6bf08a072fd7c4a442a826a0
These institutional experiments are laying an essential foundation for an improved global payment infrastructure, where instant and frictionless cross-border settlements can take place with minimal costs. Of course, the interoperability of private DLT tokens and public blockchain stablecoins has yet to be explored, but the innovation with both public and private blockchain efforts could eventually merge. This was highlighted recently by the Governor of the Bank of England who stated that “stablecoins and CBDC could sit alongside each other20”. One thing for certain is that crypto dollars (or other fiat-linked digital currencies) are going to play a significant role in our future economy.

Future Opportunities

There is never a dull moment in the crypto sector. The industry narratives constantly shift as innovation continues to evolve. Twelve years since its inception, Bitcoin has evolved from an abstract subject to a familiar concept. Its role as a secured, scarce, decentralized digital store of value has continued to gain acceptance, and it is well on its way to becoming an investable asset class as a portfolio hedge against asset price inflation and fiat currency depreciation. Stablecoins have proven to be useful as proxy dollars in the crypto world, similar to how dollars are essential in the traditional world. It is only a matter of time before stablecoins or private digital tokens dominate the cross-border payments and global remittances industry.
There are no shortages of hypes and experiments that draw new participants into the crypto space, such as smart contracts, new blockchains, ICOs, tokenization of things, or the most recent trends on DeFi tokens. These projects highlight the possibilities for a much more robust digital future, but the market also needs time to test and adopt. A reliable digital payment infrastructure must be built first in order to allow these experiments to flourish.
In this paper we examined the historical background and economic reasons for the U.S. dollar’s dominance in the world, and the probable conclusion is that the demand for U.S. dollars will likely continue, especially in the middle of a global pandemic, accompanied by a worldwide economic slowdown. The current monetary system is far from perfect, but there are no better alternatives for replacement at least in the near term. Incremental improvements are being made in both the public and private sectors, and stablecoins have a definite role to play in both the traditional and the new crypto world.
Thank you.

Reference:
[1] How the US dollar became the world’s reserve currency, Investopedia
[2] The dollar is in high demand, prone to dangerous appreciation, The Economist
[3] Dollar dominance in trade and finance, Gita Gopinath
[4] Global trades dependence on dollars, The Economist & IMF working papers
[5] Total credit to non-bank borrowers by currency of denomination, BIS
[6] Biggest stock exchanges in the world, Business Insider
[7] McKinsey Global Private Market Review 2020, McKinsey & Company
[8] Central banks current interest rates, Global Rates
[9] Venezuela hyperinflation hits 10 million percent, CNBC
[10] Lebanon inflation crisis, Reuters
[11] Venezuela cryptocurrency market, Chainalysis
[12] The most used cryptocurrency isn’t Bitcoin, Bloomberg
[13] Trading volume of all crypto assets, coinmarketcap.com
[14] Tether US dollar peg is no longer credible, Forbes
[15] New crypto derivatives let you bet on (or against) Tether’s solvency, Coindesk
[16] Remittance Price Worldwide, The World Bank
[17] Interbank Information Network, J.P. Morgan
[18] Jamie Dimon interview, CBS News
[19] Rise of the central bank digital currency, BIS
[20] Speech by Andrew Bailey, 3 September 2020, Bank of England
submitted by Tokenomy to tokenomyofficial [link] [comments]

The Wave Is Coming

Arguments rage about cryptocurrencies. They're a scam or a fraud - or are they the future of money?
People I talk to are often divided on the question on what amount to political grounds! At the same time their underlying political positions may be very close. "Cryptocurrencies are a symptom of the worst excesses of the financial industry! It's fake wealth at its most obvious" or "Crypto is the way the common man can be freed from the tyranny of central banks". I'm not really sure who is the closest to the truth on that one.
In my opinion cryptos are in effect much like precious metals: their monetary cost is hugely greater than the value of their utility and there are limitations on their supply. Crypto coins do have inherent value - by design they can be stored and exchanged independently and easily. Their supply is also limited by the way they work - this leads them having a price.
There is no more volatile asset class. A daily 10% move is commonplace. Nevertheless, in most periods since Bitcoin's inception investors would have made money. At this stage in history it's fair to say that they have been good investments.
They're different from other asset classes in their histories too: stocks, commodities, currencies, interest rates all existed hundreds of years ago. These legacies remain in the way they're traded and who trades them. By contrast crypto was invented in 2008 by technologists. Their exchanges were created, mostly, by technologists with little history in finance. The results were - by the standards of the financial world - disastrous. Multi-day outages - outages every day! Clients' actual assets lost permanently! But they continue... This is the clearest example of the great distinction between crypto and other asset classes: they come from Wall Street, crypto from Silicon Valley.
While crypto exchanges may have the reliability of websites, they gain natural benefits from Silicon Valley too: openness. Stock exchanges don't waste time making their data available - unless there's money in it - and only for reputable clients. Brokers guard their data jealously. With crypto exchanges trading data is free to all on day one, by default - no-one would have discussed any other option. The same with electronic trading: these exchanges were build on web protocols, therefore the API comes for free, basically.
This leads to unforeseen results: algotrading. For equities, when finally approved users have to fight through unwieldy, buggy authentication sequences before they can get a trade in with their online brokers like Schwab and TDAmeritrade and remain second-class citizens in getting to the order book. With crypto - there's no broker! You trade straight to the exchange just as an professional trader does. E.g. if you have a BitMEX account, you can be algorithmically trading there in less than 5 minutes from now.
I've pointed this out to people - to reactions of stunned amazement: algotrading is supposed to be for professional financial geniuses! But no, it's for everone and I think it's going to change the world.
So that's why I created this Subreddit: crypto trading is a special area and algo is its native way to trade.
submitted by tradrich to cryptoalgo [link] [comments]

End of day summary - 03/06

The Dow fell 256.50, or 0.98%, to 25,864.78 , the Nasdaq lost 162.98, or 1.87%, to 8,575.62 , and the S&P 500 declined 51.57, or 1.71%, to 2,972.37.

The stock market ended a volatile week on a lower note with the S&P 500 (-1.7%) settling just above its low from Monday. The benchmark index gained 0.6% for the week while the Dow Jones Industrial Average (-1.0%) outperformed, gaining 1.8% since last Friday.
In the U.S., nonfarm payrolls surged 273,000 in February and the unemployment rate fell back to 3.5%, which matches a five-decade low. Average hourly earnings grew 3.0% year-over-year. While a very strong report, it appears to be discounted because of the coronavirus, though it provides evidence that the U.S. economy was on solid footing before it hit. The trade deficit narrowed 6.7% to $45.3B in January as exports dipped 0.4% to $208.6B and imports dropped 1.6% to $253.9B. Wholesale inventories fell 0.4% in January, but sales jumped 1.6%.
In energy news, Reuters reported that OPEC's plans for prolonged oil cuts have been derailed as Russia refused to support the move contending it is too early to predict the effect of coronavirus on global energy demand. WTI crude for April delivery fell $4.62, or 10.1%, to end at $41.28 a barrel following the news of the OPEC blow-up. Also, Baker Hughes reported that the U.S. rig count is up 3 rigs from last week to 793.
The final session of the week was marred by a continued deterioration of sentiment due to the ongoing spread of the coronavirus while the pressure on growth expectations intensified. Treasuries essentially never stopped after Thursday's cash close, continuing their forceful charge in the overnight futures market. Treasuries did pull back from their highs in midday trade, but the long bond rallied to a fresh record high in the afternoon while the 10-yr note stopped a bit short of its best level of the day. The 10-yr yield fell 22 basis points to 0.71%, representing a 42-basis point drop for the week.
Expectations for another sharp rate cut remain in place with the fed funds futures market pointing to a 56.0% implied likelihood of a 75-basis point rate cut at or before the conclusion of the FOMC meeting on March 18.
The S&P 500 staged a 70-point rally during the final hour of trade, which led to a significant improvement in final sector standings, though all eleven sectors finished in the red.
Four groups surrendered 2.0% or more. Energy (-5.6%) and financials (-3.3%) were particularly weak throughout the day due to their exposure to growth and concerns about issuers of high-yield debt in the energy sector.
Bank stocks suffered from the drop in Treasury yields while energy companies struggled as oil fell $4.57, or 10.0%, to $41.32/bbl. The energy component ended the day at its lowest level since mid-2016 after OPEC+ could not agree to a sharp production cut despite yesterday's reports to the contrary. Russia's Energy Minister, Alexander Novak, said that OPEC+ countries are free to pump at will starting from April 1.
Shares of JPM were sharply lower amid the pullback in the market, though the bank's declines may also be made worse by news that CEO Jamie Dimon experienced an acute aortic dissection and underwent successful emergency heart surgery to repair the health issue. Co-Presidents and Chief Operating Officers Daniel Pinto and Gordon Smith will lead the company as Dimon recovers, the bank confirmed.
Shares of AAPL were lower after a fourth supplier cut guidance amid the ongoing coronavirus outbreak. ON cut its first quarter revenue outlook this morning, becoming the fourth Apple supplier to cut guidance this week after QRVO, SWKS and MCHP did so as well.
In company-specific news, COST reported better than expected Q2 results, but the stock still finished lower. AMD fared better than the broader market after reaffirming its guidance for FY20. The chipmaker did caution that Q1 results are likely to be on the low end of its guidance.
Among the noteworthy gainers were MRNA and OPK, which have each recently reported on efforts linked to combating the coronavirus. Airline stocks like ALK +4.0%, JBLU +0.1%), UAL, +1.0%, and DAL, +2.0% recorded gains on Friday after recovering from fresh multi-year lows. Alaska Air did warn that its guidance for FY20 should no longer be relied upon due to coronavirus-related uncertainty.
Among the notable losers was AOBC, which fell 30% after the gunmaker reported fiscal Q3 results below consensus and guidance. SBUX shares slid 1% after the company provided an update on the impact related to COVID-19 in China. Stifel analyst Chris O'Cull said the earnings impact to Starbucks' fiscal Q2 is likely larger than he projected, be he also pointed out that Starbucks noted there has been no perceptible impact from COVID-19 on the U.S. business.
Shares of cruise operators started the day in positive territory but retreated as the day went on. NCLH, -5.2% was the weakest performer of the bunch, stopping just above its record low (24.16) that was notched when the company went public in early 2013.
European stocks also fell sharply Friday as the coronavirus outbreak continues to impact businesses worldwide.

Currency

The U.S. Dollar Index dropped 0.9% to 95.98 and was down 2.2% for the week as rate-cut expectations boiled over. According to the CME FedWatch Tool, there is a 100% probability of another 50 basis points cut at the March 17-18 FOMC meeting and a 63% probability of a 75 basis points cut.

Treasury

U.S. Treasuries had another huge day as the stock market racked up another day of huge losses amid ongoing concerns about the spread of the coronavirus and budding credit worries. The 10-yr yield, which settled Thursday at 0.93%, went as low as 0.66% in today's curve-flattening trade before losing some steam.

Commodity

Oil prices plunged more than 8% to multi-year lows on Friday as OPEC’s allies rejected additional production cuts that the organization proposed Thursday. The meeting between OPEC and its allies, known as OPEC+, concluded with no deal on additional production cuts.
Agriculture:

Crypto

As global equity markets continue to get pummeled, bitcoin’s return to the $9,000 level may have been driven by some of the same forces causing a rally in bonds – a desire for respite from a coronavirus-plagued markets.

Bonds, Virus and Valuation

The move in Treasuries has been precipitated by flight-safety flows that have been fueled by economic growth concerns stemming from the spread of the coronavirus. It has also been stoked by momentum, interest rate differentials, and policy stimulus expectations, the latter of which have also been nothing short of stunning.
The CME FedWatch Tool is showing a 100% probability of another 50 basis points cut at the March 17-18 FOMC meeting and a 64% probability of a 75 basis points cut.
Those expectations capture the view that the coronavirus isn't "just another flu." It might have similar characteristics, but when was the last time entire cities were quarantined, professional sporting events were canceled, travel restrictions were imposed, orchestrated efforts to force employees to work from home, states of emergency were declared, U.S. schools were closed, and the Federal Reserve ushered in an emergency 50 basis points rate cut because of the flu?
Coronavirus is quite different from the flu because the reaction to it has been universally different -- and that reaction is what gets lost in the debate as to whether the coronavirus is "just another flu." Rightly or wrongly, the coronavirus is creating an economic disruption in a manner no normal flu has in our modern age and that is the important distinction for the capital markets and policymakers.
It's another reason why the strong employment report for February has been glossed over for the most part by the market. At any other time, the Treasury market would be selling off on today's report, and, arguably, the futures market would be moving sharply higher -- but this isn't any other time.
The key takeaway from the report isn't what was in the report, it was the lackluster response to it, which is a function of expecting employment reports in coming months not to look as good because of the coronavirus impact.
The market multiple has contracted to 16.7x, which is now in-line with the five-year average -- only it isn't because earnings estimates are going to fall further.

YTD

  • FAAMG + some penny stocks -4.4% YTD
  • Spoos -8.0% YTD
  • Old man -9.4% YTD
  • Russy -13.1% YTD
Summary scraped from the interweb. Took 0.18 seconds.
submitted by hibernating_brain to thewallstreet [link] [comments]

While Jamie Dimon was busy badmouthing Bitcoin his company was busy buying it up!

While Jamie Dimon was busy badmouthing Bitcoin his company was busy buying it up! submitted by MemoryDealers to btc [link] [comments]

Quit My Job...

I quit my job and today was my last day. This was made possible in part by Ethereum.
I first bought Ether at 10 dollars back in January after hearing an interview with Vitalik. It sounded like a neat techonlogy and I thought maybe in 5 years I would see some returns. I had no idea what was about to happen.
Fast forward 9 months and all I can say is it's been a hell of a ride.
For my fellow Ethtraders, here a few lessons I've learned - usually the hard way - along the ride so far...
1) You, me, Jamie Dimon, Mike Novogratz, ScienceGuy9489 and even Vitalik have no fricking idea what's gonna happen. He's said so himself.
Ethereum could shoot up to 750 tomorrow and then fall to 75 the next day. Or it could lurk around 300 for the next two years before exploding to 3000. Who knows! If you have conviction in the technology invest what you are willing to lose and don't get hung up on the day to day movement. It's just noise.
2) This has been said a million times, but for good reason: Don't invest more than you're willing to lose. For most people, this means no more than 10-20% of your money. This really goes for any asset class, even cash since there's inflation risk - but especially crypto. Ideally, in addition to crypto your money is diversified among a variety of asset classes like fiat, stocks, bonds, gold, etc.
3) Never, ever buy or sell on emotion. As a rule, if you feel like you have to buy or sell right away, then you don't. Sure, you might luck out once or twice doing so, but this is called gambling, not trading. Being impulsive will ultimately screw you over.
Our brains are running on millennia old legacy software designed to run away from threats e.g., panic sell, to follow the herd e.g., fomo buy, and in general to survive, not to be rational. When big dollar signs are flashing around, our lizard brains think it's life or death and all reason goes out the window. This is why the vast majority of traders, even professionals, lose money.
Of course in a bull market everyone is a genius. So it's easy to kid yourself, but you're probably not a great trader. I know I'm not. I've read books on trading, and I'm not a total idiot, but the fact is I would be sitting on a lot more Ether right now if I had just bought and held rather than getting all fancy.
There are a few folks who have zen-like discipline or years of experience, but for the rest of us, short-term trading is a losing game. That said, you can treat a small portion of your holdings as play money that you daytrade. Just don't be surprised if it's gone next week.
4) Don't be a maximalist. God knows I was when I first arrived here. I thought Bitcoin was Myspace and Ethereum was Facebook. I came to realize Bitcoin and Ethereum are not competitors; they are trying to do different things. The world needs both gold and oil.
5) This may sound blasphemous, but don't be absolutist about HODL-ing. For most, I think it's wise to take some profits as it goes up by selling a small to moderate portion of your holdings. Then, if/when it majorly corrects you won't freak out and panic sell. Instead, you can buy some back at a lower price. And if it doesn't correct, you'll still walk away with some profit and peace of mind.
Now, if you are very patient and don't need to take profits it's fine to 100% HODL if you are truly able to stick with it. Just be honest with yourself. There are a lot of fair-weather 'hodlers' here who hit the sell button whenever there's a major pullback. It's better, not to mention a hell of a lot easier to sell when it's pumping up than when it's plummeting.
6) It's human nature to never be satisfied. No matter how low you bought, you'll wish you had bought lower or bought more. Or you're gonna kick yourself for not selling at a peak. Remember, most people in this world still have no idea what Ethereum is and even if they do, they do not see its potential like you and me. We're early to the party.
7) Keep your life in balance. This is more important than all the above combined. Sure, it's fine to go through a phase where this consumes your life, but if you spend all day and night staring at red and green on GDAX your health and happiness will suffer. Trust me, I've been there.
Trading is already addictive but throw in a 24/7 market that never sleeps with bewildering volatility and you have the perfect recipe for sleep deprivation, anxiety, and manic ups and downs.
If you're overly obsessed with checking prices, try either setting ground rules (what I do is that I only check prices between 10am and 10pm) or step away completely for a few days or a week. I've done this a few times and I always return to the markets with renewed energy and perspective.
Money is important but once you have enough to get by, it's far less so than friends, family, health, and finding meaningful things to do in life. Remember guys, love over lambos, balance over Binance, and bros over blockfolios.. okay that last one was a stretch..
Finally, it's been said before, but that's because it's the truth: the joy is in the journey. Everything in this world is temporary. Whether Ethereum faces some existential threat and gets wiped out tomorrow or goes on to revolutionize human civilization for centuries to come, someday something else will come along and replace it.
Likewise, your stash may someday be worth zero or a million. But either way you will have won the bigger game in town if you enjoyed the ride and learned a few things along the way.
Stay safe, stay hungry, and enjoy the ride!
Note: Thank you guys for all the replies and encouragement, it means a lot. I had no idea this post would blow up like this. In hindsight, I wish I had titled this post something different and put less emphasis on the quitting job part because that's not what this post is really about. I realized from the responses that the post gives the impression that I am retiring for the rest of my life and intend to never work again. This is definitely not the case! Ethereum simply expedited me getting out of a job situation that I wanted out on anyway and has afforded me some more flexibility and freedom in the short to medium term. While I'm taking a bit of the break from the grind right now, I'll be pursuing work a bit down the line both for financial reasons and because it's part of a meaningful life
submitted by pacific_Oc3an to ethtrader [link] [comments]

Bitcoin at $136,000: Can it become the new gold standard?

Over the past year, Bitcoin’s been on a wild ride from a low of $1,183 to a peak of $19,401.
With Bitcoin’s skyrocketing prices, detractors from J.P. Morgan chief Jamie Dimon (“[Bitcoin] is a fraud”) to Berkshire Hathaway CEO Warren Buffett (“I can say almost with certainty that [cryptocurrencies] will come to a bad ending”) have been quick to decry the digital currency as a bubble.
Predicting a crypto bubble has become the latest trend as Bitcoin and other currencies have risen meteorically. In spite of this, Bitcoin has shown that it is still a new asset with room to grow.
Bitcoin’s current market cap of $134 billion, is massive compared to most companies, and even some countries. But this pales in significance compared to traditional assets like gold. If Bitcoin becomes a widely accepted store of value, it may one day replace some of the functions of gold in the market.
Today, there is an estimated 190,040 tonnes of gold above ground in the world, with 54,000 known reserves below ground that can be mined. At today’s rate of $1,335 per ounce, that means there’s around $11.5 trillion worth of gold in the world that we know about.
Imagine that Bitcoin replaces 25% of today’s gold market. Bitcoin would leapfrog another 17x above today’s current prices.
Here’s some (very rough) back-of-the-paper-wallet math:
25% of $11.5 trillion gold reserves = $2.86 trillion $1.975 trillion market cap of bitcoin / 21 million bitcoin = 136,190 price per bitcoin While this scenario may seem extremely far-fetched, it’s not completely out of the realm of reality. In this article, we’ll look at some of the key characteristics that Bitcoin shares with gold that make it useful as a store of value and speculate around how Bitcoin might eat into the dominance of gold.
What is a Store of Value? Skeptics like to point out that Bitcoin isn’t that useful as a currency. It can have high fees, long transaction times, and comes with numerous security risks. It’s still much easier to pay for goods and services with a credit card than sending bitcoin to someone’s public address.
Yet all these things actually make Bitcoin similar to something people have valued for thousands of years: gold.
Gold has certain properties that make it useful. It conducts electricity well, and it looks pretty. But if you compare gold to more common metals such as copper or nickel, it’s actually a lot less useful for making things — it bends too easily.
The main utility of gold is that it functions as a store of value. Because gold is extremely scarce and expensive to produce it tends to retain value over time. If you buy gold today, you’ll likely be able to exchange it for a similar amount in the future.
To understand how gold functions as a store of value and how Bitcoin might replace it, we have to dig deeper into the history of gold.
A Brief Primer on Gold Gold has been valued and used as a store of value for millennia. The first known use of gold as currency began several thousand years ago in Asia.
Even with the widespread adoption of paper currency in the form of bank notes in the 19th century, the gold standard remained the most popular financial system in the world. Nations would set a fixed price that they would trade gold for paper money. For centuries, gold was an acceptable form of currency. That’s a big part of why gold is still valuable today — we believe that gold is valuable, and this belief has been culturally ingrained.
Gold has a number of properties that make it useful for this purpose. For starters, it lasts a really long time.The chemical half-life of gold is 168 days, compared to 130 days for silver, and a mere 61 hours for copper.
Gold is also easy to split up into smaller parts and transport. You can remelt a gold ingot into smaller gold coins, or even smaller pieces of jewelry. It’s also portable: an ounce of gold is worth $1,335 and weighs the same as a slice of bread. It’s estimated that the 190,040 tonnes of gold above ground would fit into a cube with 67 foot sides.
Today, we use gold for many different things. Jewelry is the most common use-case representing roughly 48% of all above-ground gold. 21% is used for private investment, whether in the physical form of gold bullion or in financial instruments like exchange-traded funds. Another 17% is used by the official sector by central banks as a reserve currency. The other 14% is used for other purposes, from industrial applications like electronics to dentistry.
source: World Gold Council
While the gold standard has largely been abandoned, gold remains a useful hedge against currency instability.
That’s because gold is inherently scarce, with a limited supply. On average, 1,500–3,000 tonnes of gold is mined each year, adding a mere 1–2% annual increase to the supply of gold. It’s also highly liquid and can be exchanged for money anywhere in the world.
Central banks buy gold to avoid currency risks and hedge against inflation. Gold is held in reserve and can be liquidated quickly in times of crises. In 2016, Russia’s central bank purchased 201 tonnes of gold in response to a weakening rouble and international sanctions, making it the largest acquirer of gold.
Today, gold continues to retain its significance because it operates as a store of value that’s removed from the financial system.
The Bull Case for Bitcoin: Why Bitcoin may replace Gold On the surface, Bitcoin and gold couldn’t be more different. Bitcoin is a digital, peer-to-peer currency created in 2008, and distributed across nodes around the world. Gold is a natural element that is mined from the ground, and which has been used as a store of value for millennia.
Despite these differences, Bitcoin and gold both share characteristics that make them useful as a store of value:
Just like the supply of gold is constrained to the amount that can be mined, the supply of Bitcoin is written into the code and maxes out at 21 million coins. While gold is relatively portable, can be verified, and divided into smaller units, Bitcoin is cryptographically secured, controlled via private key, and can be divided infinitely. That gives it distinct advantages over gold as a store of value.
While gold is useful as a store of value because it’s valuable relative to physical size, this still adds up when you’re operating at scale. For example, when the German central bank wanted to bring home 374 metric tons of gold back to Frankfurt, the gold had to be assessed for purity, be remolded from bullion into bars, then secured and transported. The whole operation cost $ 9 million. There’s a clear argument that a digital currency like Bitcoin would be much better suited to maintain reserves than gold bars.
Central banks are already beginning to look at the benefits of digital currencies. The Swedish central bank is investigating the possibility of launching a digital supplement to cash, called the e-krona. Singapore is experimenting with use-cases for cryptocurrency from cross-border payments to creating a digital Singapore dollar.
Similar to gold, Bitcoin sees high usage as a store of value in countries with currency controls or instability. In Argentina, for example, people use Bitcoin to circumvent government currency controls mean, saving nearly 40% on foreign currency exchanges. In Venezuela, Bitcoin usage has become widespread to buy everything from food to movie tickets in the face of 2,616% inflation. The Venezuelan government even launched its own contentious cryptocurrency, called the Petro, in an effort to circumvent international sanctions.
Like gold, Bitcoin provides a store of value that’s separated from the official financial system. Unlike gold, Bitcoin is far easier to hold onto and exchange. If 25% of the gold that’s used as a store of value in jewelry, private investment, and the official sector moves to Bitcoin, we may see Bitcoin at $136,190.
The New Gold Standard Bitcoin rose from the 2008 financial crash, promising a digital currency free from central bank intervention. This is something that we’ve always needed — just look at gold. Gold is useful because it provides a store of value outside of currency and stock markets. Bitcoin, if it’s able to address key technical and scalability challenges, has the potential to do the same.
What’s important to remember is that despite the boom-and-bust hype cycle, we’re still in the early innings.
https://blog.sfox.com/bitcoin-at-136-000-can-it-become-the-new-gold-standard-ee98b11aacfc
submitted by pmp301 to BitcoinMarkets [link] [comments]

Both NEO and crypto as a whole lost credibility today

First off I started buying antshares at $10. I've been investing in various projects for a little over a year. I've made money and have few complaints. Today, however, I watched something unfold that deeply troubled me. A project with one of the most supportive communities in all of crypto played a very childish game with their supporters, and hurt a lot of them financially.
And before you decide I'm spreading FUD or shilling another coin, please do me the courtesy of answering this one question honestly. If WTC or VTC or any other project had pulled this kind of stunt today what would you, a full blown NEO supporter, being saying about that project and their dev team? You'd be screaming "shitcoin!" at the top of your lungs.
We are all investors. Period. Nobody is putting their hard earned money into cryptocurrency for the betterment of humanity. We're all attempting to better our lives. And our individual goals are no one else's business. If somebody actually wants to buy a lambo is it our place to judge? No it isn't.
A lot of people have little to no money and are scraping together whatever small amount they can to invest. If all they have is $100 are they "assholes" for trying to trade and turn it into more? The daily feed is full of comments calling them that or worse for trying to trade up. If you have nothing to start with, how the hell can you "hodl" and ever have any hope of a better life? Attacking people for trying to make sound investments and turn a profit is wrong. The more money people put into crypto, the more there is for everyone. How many new investors got burned by NEO today? How many will never be supportive of NEO in the future? Are they assholes and crybabies for trusting NEO's team when they tweeted about big news?
Would you call someone who invested their life savings in Microsoft, Amazon, or Apple 20 years ago a dumb fuck? Then why would so many people call the ones who have enough faith in NEO to invest heavily dumb fucks like they did all day on the daily feed? Those investors aren't the ones who sent out unsolicited tweets promising big things. NEO did that.
For a multi billion dollar market cap business to send out ridiculous tweets like NEO did today is not only unprofessional, it's irresponsible. Make no mistake. Big money and institutional investors are coming. The stock market is past due for a drastic correction. Crypto is going to look extremely attractive to the big boys trying to make up for their huge stock market losses.
What do you think will happen when sneaky fucks the likes of Jamie Dimon go all in with crypto? Do you really believe they won't figure out ways to bully even the largest current crypto investors into submission? The only hope we have of being able to keep crypto out of the hands of these manipulators is to stick together and support one another. A stunt like today that harmed a bunch of small, individual investors cannot be good for crypto. Toying with people and convincing them that earth shattering news is coming plays right into the hands of institutional investors who can't wait to run to their respective governments and urge for regulation. A Wall Street firm has already promised publicly to 'tame bitcoin'. Today's NEO fiasco smells a lot like market manipulation, and trust me it won't go unnoticed by regulators.
If you're thinking crypto can't be regulated, you're being naive. In order to become mainstream and make the kind of money people believe it will, crypto will have to submit to some regulation. Screw a bunch of small investors out of their money by manipulating the market and you're virtually guaranteeing heavy handed regulation.
I'm not done with NEO. I still believe it has a lot of merit. But credibility and trust are difficult to come by. So it seems like utter madness to me to piss it away so carelessly the way NEO did today.
What should have been a public relations coup for NEO has become a full blown disaster. I spent years in crisis and media management. Fucking up is bound to happen. It's how you handle the aftermath and blowback that separates the quality companies from the scammers. I've yet to see any real damage control from NEO. Maybe they feel they don't need any, but if they look at the thousands of comments on the daily discussion they are clearly wrong.
There's an old saying that applies to this debacle. Perception is reality. What your company looks like is what it is to people. Is the way NEO looked today truly the project you want to be behind and invested in?
Wake up NEO. Get your shit together. Hang your head. Say you're sorry. Get ahead of this thing before it turns more people off to a fantastic project. All you guys sitting on fat stacks need to realize nobody in crypto is king yet. Support matters. Trust matters. Credibility matters. Lose those and there will be another coin standing in the wings to take your place.
submitted by revanyo to NEO [link] [comments]

The Great Bitcoin Bull Market Of 2017 by Trace Mayer

By: Trace Mayer, host of The Bitcoin Knowledge Podcast.
Originally posted here with images and Youtube videos.
I just got back from a two week vacation without Internet as I was scouring some archeological ruins. I hardly thought about Bitcoin at all because there were so many other interesting things and it would be there when I got back.
Jimmy Song suggested I do an article on the current state of Bitcoin. A great suggestion but he is really smart (he worked on Armory after all!) so I better be thorough and accurate!
Therefore, this article will be pretty lengthy and meticulous.
BACKGROUND
As I completely expected, the 2X movement from the New York Agreement that was supposed to happen during the middle of my vacation flopped on its face because Jeff Garzik was driving the clown car with passengers willfully inside like Coinbase, Blockchain.info, Bitgo and Xapo and there were here massive bugS and in the code and miners like Bitmain did not want to allocate $150-350m to get it over the difficulty adjustments.
I am very disappointed in their lack of integrity with putting their money where their mouths are; myself and many others wanted to sell a lot of B2X for BTC!
On 7 December 2015, with Bitcoin trading at US$388.40, I wrote The Rise of the Fourth Great Bitcoin Bubble. On 4 December 2016, with Bitcoin trading at US$762.97, I did this interview:

As of 26 November 2017, Bitcoin is trading around US$9,250.00. That is an increase of about 2,400% since I wrote the article prognosticating this fourth great Bitcoin bull market. I sure like being right, like usual (19 Dec 2011, 1 Jul 2013), especially when there are financial and economic consequences.
With such massive gains in such a short period of time the speculative question becomes: Buy, Hold or Sell?
FUNDAMENTALS
Bitcoin is the decentralized censorship-resistant Internet Protocol for transferring value over a communications channel.
The Bitcoin network can use traditional Internet infrastructure. However, it is even more resilient because it has custom infrastructure including, thanks to Bitcoin Core developer Matt Corrallo, the FIBRE network and, thanks to Blockstream, satellites which reduce the cost of running a full-node anywhere in the world to essentially nothing in terms of money or privacy. Transactions can be cheaply broadcast via SMS messages.
SECURITY
The Bitcoin network has a difficulty of 1,347,001,430,559 which suggests about 9,642,211 TH/s of custom ASIC hardware deployed.
At a retail price of approximately US$105/THs that implies about $650m of custom ASIC hardware deployed (35% discount applied).
This custom hardware consumes approximately 30 TWh per year. That could power about 2.8m US households or the entire country of Morocco which has a population of 33.85m.
This Bitcoin mining generates approximately 12.5 bitcoins every 10 minutes or approximately 1,800 per day worth approximately US$16,650,000.
Bitcoin currently has a market capitalization greater than $150B which puts it solidly in the top-30 of M1 money stock countries and a 200 day moving average of about $65B which is increasing about $500m per day.
Average daily volumes for Bitcoin is around US$5B. That means multi-million dollar positions can be moved into and out of very easily with minimal slippage.
When my friend Andreas Antonopolous was unable to give his talk at a CRYPSA event I was invited to fill in and delivered this presentation, impromptu, on the Seven Network Effects of Bitcoin.
These seven network effects of Bitcoin are (1) Speculation, (2) Merchants, (3) Consumers, (4) Security [miners], (5) Developers, (6) Financialization and (7) Settlement Currency are all taking root at the same time and in an incredibly intertwined way.
With only the first network effect starting to take significant root; Bitcoin is no longer a little experiment of magic Internet money anymore. Bitcoin is monster growing at a tremendous rate!!

SPECULATION
For the Bitcoin price to remain at $9,250 it requires approximately US$16,650,000 per day of capital inflow from new hodlers.
Bitcoin is both a Giffen good and a Veblen good.
A Giffen good is a product that people consume more of as the price rises and vice versa — seemingly in violation of basic laws of demand in microeconomics such as with substitute goods and the income effect.
Veblen goods are types of luxury goods for which the quantity demanded increases as the price increases in an apparent contradiction of the law of demand.
There are approximately 16.5m bitcoins of which ~4m are lost, ~4-6m are in deep cold storage, ~4m are in cold storage and ~2-4m are salable.
(http://www.runtogold.com/images/lost-bitcoins-1.jpg)
(http://www.runtogold.com/images/lost-bitcoins-2.jpg)
And forks like BCash (BCH) should not be scary but instead be looked upon as an opportunity to take more territory on the Bitcoin blockchain by trading the forks for real bitcoins which dries up more salable supply by moving it, likely, into deep cold storage.
According to Wikipedia, there are approximately 15.4m millionaires in the United States and about 12m HNWIs ($30m+ net worth) in the world. In other words, if every HNWI in the world wanted to own an entire bitcoin as a 'risk-free asset' that cannot be confiscated, seized or have the balance other wise altered then they could not.
For wise portfolio management, these HNWIs should have at least about 2-5% in gold and 0.5-1% in bitcoin.
Why? Perhaps some of the 60+ Saudis with 1,700 frozen bank accounts and about $800B of assets being targetted might be able to explain it to you.
In other words, everyone loves to chase the rabbit and once they catch it then know that it will not get away.
RETAIL
There are approximately 150+ significant Bitcoin exchanges worldwide. Kraken, according to the CEO, was adding about 6,000 new funded accounts per day in July 2017.
Supposedly, Coinbase is currently adding about 75,000 new accounts per day. Based on some trade secret analytics I have access to; I would estimate Coinbase is adding approximately 17,500 new accounts per day that purchase at least US$100 of Bitcoin.
If we assume Coinbase accounts for 8% of new global Bitcoin users who purchase at least $100 of bitcoins (just pulled out of thin error and likely very conservative as the actual number is perhaps around 2%) then that is approximately $21,875,000 of new capital coming into Bitcoin every single day just from retail demand from 218,750 total new accounts.
What I have found is that most new users start off buying US$100-500 and then after 3-4 months months they ramp up their capital allocation to $5,000+ if they have the funds available.
After all, it takes some time and practical experience to learn how to safely secure one's private keys.
To do so, I highly recommend Bitcoin Core (network consensus and full validation of the blockchain), Armory (private key management), Glacier Protocol (operational procedures) and a Puri.sm laptop (secure non-specialized hardware).
WALL STREET
There has been no solution for large financial fiduciaries to invest in Bitcoin. This changed November 2017.
LedgerX, whose CEO I interviewed 23 March 2013, began trading as a CFTC regulated Swap Execution Facility and Derivatives Clearing Organization.
The CME Group announced they will begin trading in Q4 2017 Bitcoin futures.
The CBOE announced they will begin trading Bitcoin futures soon.
By analogy, these institutional products are like connecting a major metropolis's water system (US$90.4T and US$2 quadrillion) via a nanoscopic shunt to a tiny blueberry ($150B) that is infinitely expandable.
This price discovery could be the most wild thing anyone has ever experienced in financial markets.
THE GREAT CREDIT CONTRACTION
The same week Bitcoin was released I published my book The Great Credit Contraction and asserted it had now begun and capital would burrow down the liquidity pyramid into safer and more liquid assets.
(http://www.runtogold.com/images/Great-Credit-Contraction-Liquidity-Pyramid.jpg)
Thus, the critical question becomes: Is Bitcoin a possible solution to the Great Credit Contraction by becoming the safest and most liquid asset?
BITCOIN'S RISK PROFILE
At all times and in all circumstances gold remains money but, of course, there is always exchange rate risk due to price ratios constantly fluctuating. If the metal is held with a third-party in allocated-allocated storage (safest possible) then there is performance risk (Morgan Stanley gold storage lawsuit).
But, if properly held then, there should be no counter-party risk which requires the financial ability of a third-party to perform like with a bank account deposit. And, since gold exists at a single point in space and time therefore it is subject to confiscation or seizure risk.
Bitcoin is a completely new asset type. As such, the storage container is nearly empty with only $150B.
And every Bitcoin transaction effectively melts down every BTC and recasts it; thus ensuring with 100% accuracy the quantity and quality of the bitcoins. If the transaction is not on the blockchain then it did not happen. This is the strictest regulation possible; by math and cryptography!
This new immutable asset, if properly secured, is subject only to exchange rate risk. There does exist the possibility that a software bug may exist that could shut down the network, like what has happened with Ethereum, but the probability is almost nil and getting lower everyday it does not happen.
Thus, Bitcoin arguably has a lower risk profile than even gold and is the only blockchain to achieve security, scalability and liquidity.
To remain decentralized, censorship-resistant and immutable requires scalability so as many users as possible can run full-nodes.
(http://www.runtogold.com/images/ethereum-bitcoin-scability-nov-2017.png)
TRANSACTIONS
Some people, probably mostly those shilling alt-coins, think Bitcoin has a scalability problem that is so serious it requires a crude hard fork to solve.
On the other side of the debate, the Internet protocol and blockchain geniuses assert the scalability issues can, like other Internet Protocols have done, be solved in different layers which are now possible because of Segregated Witness which was activated in August 2017.
Whose code do you want to run: the JV benchwarmers or the championship Chicago Bulls?
As transaction fees rise, certain use cases of the Bitcoin blockchain are priced out of the market. And as the fees fall then they are economical again.
Additionally, as transaction fees rise, certain UTXOs are no longer economically usable thus destroying part of the money supply until fees decline and UTXOs become economical to move.
There are approximately 275,000-350,000 transactions per day with transaction fees currently about $2m/day and the 200 DMA is around $1.08m/day.
(http://www.runtogold.com/images/bitcoin-transaction-fees-nov-2017.png)
What I like about transaction fees is that they somewhat reveal the financial health of the network.
The security of the Bitcoin network results from the miners creating solutions to proof of work problems in the Bitcoin protocol and being rewarded from the (1) coinbase reward which is a form of inflation and (2) transaction fees which is a form of usage fee.
The higher the transaction fees then the greater implied value the Bitcoin network provides because users are willing to pay more for it.
I am highly skeptical of blockchains which have very low transaction fees. By Internet bubble analogy, Pets.com may have millions of page views but I am more interested in EBITDA.
DEVELOPERS
Bitcoin and blockchain programming is not an easy skill to acquire and master. Most developers who have the skill are also financially independent now and can work on whatever they want.
The best of the best work through the Bitcoin Core process. After all, if you are a world class mountain climber then you do not hang out in the MacDonalds play pen but instead climb Mount Everest because that is where the challenge is.
However, there are many talented developers who work in other areas besides the protocol. Wallet maintainers, exchange operators, payment processors, etc. all need competent developers to help build their businesses.
Consequently, there is a huge shortage of competent developers. This is probably the largest single scalability constraint for the ecosystem.
Nevertheless, the Bitcoin ecosystem is healthier than ever before.
(http://www.runtogold.com/images/bitcoin-ecosystem.jpg)(/images/bitcoin-ecosystem-small.jpg)
SETTLEMENT CURRENCY
There are no significant global reserve settlement currency use cases for Bitcoin yet.
Perhaps the closest is Blockstream's Strong Federations via Liquid.
PRICE
There is a tremendous amount of disagreement in the marketplace about the value proposition of Bitcoin. Price discovery for this asset will be intense and likely take many cycles of which this is the fourth.
Since the supply is known the exchange rate of Bitcoins is composed of (1) transactional demand and (2) speculative demand.
Interestingly, the price elasticity of demand for the transactional demand component is irrelevant to the price. This makes for very interesting dynamics!
(http://www.runtogold.com/images/bitcoin-speculation.jpg)
On 4 May 2017, Lightspeed Venture Partners partner Jeremy Liew who was among the early Facebook investors and the first Snapchat investor laid out their case for bitcoin exploding to $500,000 by 2030.
On 2 November 2017, Goldman Sachs CEO Lloyd Blankfein (https://www.bloomberg.com/news/articles/2017-11-02/blankfein-says-don-t-dismiss-bitcoin-while-still-pondering-value)said, "Now we have paper that is just backed by fiat...Maybe in the new world, something gets backed by consensus."
On 12 Sep 2017, JP Morgan CEO called Bitcoin a 'fraud' but conceded that "(http://fortune.com/2017/09/12/jamie-dimon-bitcoin-cryptocurrency-fraud-buy/)Bitcoin could reach $100,000".
Thus, it is no surprise that the Bitcoin chart looks like a ferret on meth when there are such widely varying opinions on its value proposition.
I have been around this space for a long time. In my opinion, those who scoffed at the thought of $1 BTC, $10 BTC (Professor Bitcorn!), $100 BTC, $1,000 BTC are scoffing at $10,000 BTC and will scoff at $100,000 BTC, $1,000,000 BTC and even $10,000,000 BTC.
Interestingly, the people who understand it the best seem to think its financial dominance is destiny.
Meanwhile, those who understand it the least make emotionally charged, intellectually incoherent bearish arguments. A tremendous example of worldwide cognitive dissonance with regards to sound money, technology and the role or power of the State.
Consequently, I like looking at the 200 day moving average to filter out the daily noise and see the long-term trend.
(http://www.runtogold.com/images/bitcoin-price-200dma-nov-2017.png)
Well, that chart of the long-term trend is pretty obvious and hard to dispute. Bitcoin is in a massive secular bull market.
The 200 day moving average is around $4,001 and rising about $30 per day.
So, what do some proforma situations look like where Bitcoin may be undervalued, average valued and overvalued? No, these are not prognostications.
(http://www.runtogold.com/images/bitcoin-price-pro-forma.png)
Maybe Jamie Dimon is not so off his rocker after all with a $100,000 price prediction.
We are in a very unique period of human history where the collective globe is rethinking what money is and Bitcoin is in the ring battling for complete domination. Is or will it be fit for purpose?
As I have said many times before, if Bitcoin is fit for this purpose then this is the largest wealth transfer in the history of the world.
CONCLUSION
Well, this has been a brief analysis of where I think Bitcoin is at the end of November 2017.
The seven network effects are taking root extremely fast and exponentially reinforcing each other. The technological dominance of Bitcoin is unrivaled.
The world is rethinking what money is. Even CEOs of the largest banks and partners of the largest VC funds are honing in on Bitcoin's beacon.
While no one has a crystal ball; when I look in mine I see Bitcoin's future being very bright.
Currently, almost everyone who has bought Bitcoin and hodled is sitting on unrealized gains as measured in fiat currency. That is, after all, what uncharted territory with daily all-time highs do!
But perhaps there is a larger lesson to be learned here.
Riches are getting increasingly slippery because no one has a reliable defined tool to measure them with. Times like these require incredible amounts of humility and intelligence guided by macro instincts.
Perhaps everyone should start keeping books in three numéraires: USD, gold and Bitcoin.
Both gold and Bitcoin have never been worth nothing. But USD is a fiat currency and there are thousands of those in the fiat currency graveyard. How low can the world reserve currency go?
After all, what is the risk-free asset? And, whatever it is, in The Great Credit Contraction you want it!
What do you think? Disagree with some of my arguments or assertions? Please, eviscerate them on Twitter or in the comments!
submitted by bitcoinknowledge to Bitcoin [link] [comments]

We are averaging 2,000 new subs daily.

We just celebrated the 350,000 mark 5 days ago and today we are over 360,000. Nice to see this sub and the Bitcoin community in general growing this big and this fast.
If you are one of those many just coming in, welcome! I'm sure you'll find this place very interesting, fun and informative. We are here to help you to better understand what Bitcoin is and and how it works, and for ourselves to keep learning. This is my welcome post for newbies:
When you come asking when is a good time to buy, the answer is: Buy now, always Hodl in FUD times (Bitcoin has "died" many times, but Moneybadger don't care, buy the dips and never panic-sell, stuff like: "China ban Bitcoin...again!" will keep happening again and again.
Here's Bitcoin's response to Jamie Dimon. Stick to the real Bitcoin through all the 'forks' and 'splits' that accomplish nothing but new mediocre, unsafe and centralized altcoins, strengthen/immunize Bitcoin and give you free altcoins to buy more Bitcoin.
All Central Powers look silly trying to control or ban it. Learn from history and listen to this absolute Boss. There will never be enough Bitcoin for every existing millionaire to own just ONE SINGLE BITCOIN, Total number of millionaires (in USD value) worldwide is around 33 million. Get one while you still can.
Also relax, you are actually an early adopter if you start investing today, mentally prepare yourself for healthy and expected market volatility/dips/corrections/"crashes" (check out this amazing 'Corrections Trends Perspective') and remember all this regarding Bitcoin investment:
Never try to time the market. Dollar cost average by buying what you can afford to lose every week.
It is always a good time to buy Bitcoin if you are hodling long term and not just for day trading, so this is a great strategy. Remember that Bitcoin has practically been up most of the time, and the road to the moon is paved with minor corrections (Bitcoin is never really "down" when you zoom-out).
Everybody parroting: "The bitcoin bubble is about to pop" since 2009, don't know that bitcoin is a decentralized system with mathematically fixed, deflatioary and limited supply currency and its growth is exponential.
So is not farfetched to say that it will be at 100,000 by 2020, since it came from less than $1 to $5,000 in less than 10 years, and it hasn't even hit the bottom part of the exponential 'S-Curve' of adoption. Check out this great 2017 MIT study: "The Cryptocurrency Market Is Growing Exponentially". Patience pays, don't listen to the "Expert Analysts on MSM".
Bitcoin is a Moneybadger that get's stronger and immunized with every new attack and this broad picture of its price since infancy (1 year candles on a logarithmic scale) shows Bitcoin growth is not in a "bubble" right now. Learn the difference between Inflation (dollar) and Deflation (Bitcoin) and just take a look at the fiat >20 trillion (and growing fast) debt clock to get a visual shock of unlimited fiat supply (vs limited Bitcoin/Gold supply).
Bitcoin has outperformed every other currency, commodity, stock and asset since its inception in 2009: "2017: Bitcoin Beats Stocks, Bonds, And Gold, Again”. Bitcoin, the Moneybadger, is the first unseizable store of value in human history, unlike gold, equities, or fiat, it can't be confiscated if stored correctly. How banks think blockchain will disrupt their industry.
Also, remember its fixed, limited supply of 21 million coins ever, there are just ~4.5 million (~20%) bitcoins left to be mined till 2140 and the production will keep decreasing ("halving") every 4 years till then. So, remember this and don't wait for the Bitcoin "bubble" to burst or for the price to drop significantly again, because you could be waiting forever:
“The best time to buy bitcoin was a few years ago, the second best time is always now”.
Don't be -- this guy
Here is a good start:
"Introduction to Bitcoin" - Andreas Antonopoulos
Playlists on Andreas own YT channel
Check out this great articles:
"What Gave Bitcoin Its Value?"
"How do Bitcoins have value?"
"Yes, Cryptocurrencies are Valuable"
ELI5: BITCOIN
How to buy Bitcoin?
Where to buy Bitcoin list
Excellent "Crypto 101" by stos313)
Where to use Bitcoin list by Bitcoin-Yoda
Starter Guide "Bitcoin Complete And Ultimate Guide".
Who accepts Bitcoin? List of Companies, Stores, Shops.
Bitcoin is a worldwide-distributed decentralized peer-to-peer censorship-resistant trustless and permissionless deflationary system/currency (see Blockchain technology) backed by mathematics, open source code, cryptography and the most powerful and secure decentralized computational network on the planet, orders of magnitude more powerful than google and government combined. There is a limit of 21 million bitcoins (divisible in smaller units). "Backed by Government" money is not backed by anything and is infinitely printed at will by Central Banks. Bitcoin is limited and decentralized.
Receive and transfer money, from cents (micropayments) to thousands:
And that’s just as currency, Bitcoin has many more uses and applications.
Edit: Fixed some non-working links and added new ones.
submitted by readish to Bitcoin [link] [comments]

r/Bitcoin recap - January 2018

Hi Bitcoiners!
I’m back with the thirteenth monthly Bitcoin news recap. I must say it's becoming pretty hard to select just 1 or 2 stories per day, too much is going on!
For those unfamiliar, each day I pick out the most popularelevant/interesting stories in Bitcoin and save them. At the end of the month I release them in one batch, to give you a quick (but not necessarily the best) overview of what happened in the Bitcoin space over the past month.
You can see recaps of the previous months on Bitcoinsnippets.com
A recap of Bitcoin in January 2018
submitted by SamWouters to Bitcoin [link] [comments]

Story Time: My Professor Talked About How Jamie Dimon Thinks Bitcoin is Scam

I'm honestly considering giving him some bitcoin. But I feel like there's a better way to fuck with him and blow his mind/change his mind at the same time. So I'm open to creative suggestions/thoughts about this situation.
looking back at this, it reads like a tv episode. but all of this actually happened to me, strange world.
submitted by Fiach_Dubh to Bitcoin [link] [comments]

End of day summary - 12/06

The Dow fell 79.40, or 0.32%, to 24,947.67, the Nasdaq gained 29.83, or 0.42%, to 7,188.26 , and the S&P 500 declined 4.11, or 0.15%, to 2,695.95.
The S&P 500 lost 0.2%, but was able to fight back after being down as much as 2.9% earlier in the session. The Dow Jones Industrial Average lost 0.3% after being down as many as 785 points or 3.1%. The Nasdaq Composite added 0.4%, yet it had been down as many as 174 points or 2.4%.
The major indices suffered steep losses in the early going after news of the arrest of Huawei Technologies' CFO fueled concerns about U.S.-China trade negotiations. News surfaced Wednesday that Huawei CFO Meng Wanzhou was arrested in Canada Dec. 1 amid allegations the company violated U.S. trade sanctions on Iran. Ms. Meng is expected to be extradited to the U.S. to face the charges. Her arrest invited worries about potential retaliation against U.S. companies doing business in/with China. In a broader context, the sense that there might not be a trade deal fueled global growth concerns. The arrest opened a new front in the U.S.-China trade war, which had seemed to turn a positive corner following the G20 meeting. The markets continued to lose ground during the morning session, but the averages pared a good portion of their losses prior to the close. The recovery may have been aided by a Wall Street Journal recap of recent interviews and public statements from Federal Reserve officials that stated that the central bank members are considering whether to signal a "new wait-and-see" approach after a likely rate hike in December.
In other developments, JPM CEO Jamie Dimon shared some typically practical viewpoints in a CNBC interview that helped provide a measure of support for an oversold stock market. Mr. Dimon said he realizes the China trade issue is the main source of market volatility right now, but believes there could be enough progress in trade talks in the next 90 days to create, or push out, another deadline. He did acknowledge, though, that the trade uncertainty is not a good thing.
Regarding interest rates, Mr. Dimon believes the world is better off with the U.S. growing and rates going up because of that growth than it is with the U.S. being in a recession and rates going down because of it. He thinks if there is a bubble anywhere it is in U.S. government bonds.
Within the S&P 500, the energy (-1.8%), financials (-1.5%), materials (-1.4%), and industrial (-0.6%) sectors underperformed the broader market.
The oil-sensitive energy group fell in tandem with oil prices. WTI crude fell 3.0% to $51.56/bbl amid reports that Saudi Arabia is floating an idea for OPEC to cut production less than the market expected.
Conversely, the real estate (+2.7%), communication services (+1.0%), consumer discretionary (+0.6%), and information technology (+0.2%) sectors all finished in the green on Thursday.
Strong finishes from many of the FAANG stocks helped lift the broader market, which rallied sharply into the close on broad-based buying interest. FB, NFLX, GOOGL, and AMZN all rose between 1.2% and 2.7%, Meanwhile, AAPL traded lower with a loss of 1.1%, but was able to close near its session high.
Among the noteworthy gainers was DFRG, which rose 16% after shareholder Engaged Capital urged the board to explore strategic alternatives. Also higher was TST, which gained 35% after announcing that it has entered into a definitive agreement to sell its institutional business units, The Deal and BoardEx, for $87.3M to Euromoney Institutional Investor.
Among the notable losers was NPTN, which fell 16% after B. Riley FBR analyst Dave Kang downgraded the stock to Neutral from Buy on Huawei uncertainty. Also lower was SIG, which slid 18% after reporting quarterly results.
European stocks cratered on Thursday, amid fears of slowing growth, falling oil prices and a fresh flare-up in tensions between the world's two largest economies. The pan-European Stoxx 600 fell more than 3.3 percent with all and major bourses sectors in negative territory. The index clsoed at 342 points, marking a two year low. It was the worst daily percentage drop for the STOXX 600 since Brexit.

Currency

The dollar weakened against major peers on Thursday as U.S. The dollar has been under pressure this week as an inversion in part of the U.S. yield curve raised a red flag for a potential recession.

Treasury

The sharp selling in the stock market off the open, fueled a flight-to-safety in the Treasury market that pushed yields noticeably lower across the curve. The 2-yr yield dropped three basis points to 2.77% after hitting 2.68% intraday. The 10-yr yield dropped five basis points to 2.87% after hitting 2.82% intraday. The backtracking in the Treasury market also coincided with the close of European markets and the rebound effort in the stock market.

Commodity

Oil prices tumbled about 3 percent on Thursday as OPEC reportedly agreed to cut production, but ended its closely-watched meeting without a decision on how much crude the cartel will take off the market.

Crypto

Bitcoin has today sunk to its lowest level since the beginning of the year as a cryptocurrency-wide market rout continues to cause pain for holders of bitcoin, ethereum, Ripple's XRP and other major digital tokens.

YTD

  • Nasdaq +4.1% YTD
  • Dow +0.9% YTD
  • S&P 500 +0.8% YTD
  • Russell 2000 -3.9% YTD

Numbers

  • Most active options; AAPL (calls), F (puts), BAC (calls), C (calls)

AH news

  • LULU reports Q3 adjusted EPS 75c, consensus 70c
  • AVGO beats Q4 EPS by 27c
  • TSLA said to plan paying March note holders mix of stock and cash

What's tomorrow?

08:30 ET: Employment Situation Report for November
  • Nonfarm payrolls (consensus 189,000)
  • Nonfarm private payrolls (consensus 185,000)
  • Avg. hourly earnings (consensus +0.3%)
  • Unemployment rate (consensus 3.7%)
  • Avg. workweek (consensus 34.5)
Summary scraped from the interweb. Took 0.20 seconds.
submitted by hibernating_brain to thewallstreet [link] [comments]

Sick and tired of plebs freaking out over SHORT-TERM fluctuations

This is freaking cryptocurrency not Apple stocks, stop expecting stable growth on a daily basis. BCH drops below $1000 and we immediately get an influx of 'genius' crypto experts panicking and asking for advice on selling, and complaining about pumping and dumping.
........ 4 weeks ago we faced Bitcoin Cash fading into obscurity on a downward drift to $300. THOSE were dark days. Stop moaning at 20% drops in a day, every single cryptocurrency has faced that within the last few months, its to be expected in a revolutionary new asset class which has yet to find its place in the markets.
"But Bitcoin is at ATH!!!! lets switch bakk and HODL it instead! Litening!!"
Bitcoin faced YEARS of stagnation and mean reversion patterns before reaching the promised land of explosive growth we're seeing in it today. Bitcoin built up a brand name, a reputation among less crypto-savvy investors. Believe it or not- THAT TAKES TIME! No, not 3 days, not 3 months, it takes 3+ years.
My point is that to make serious, consistent returns on Bitcoin Cash you have to WAIT. And don't concern yourself with short term drops ffs. You know the coin is barely 3 months old. You know we've just had a hard fork. You know that wallets are dumping en masse. You know that segwitcoin is being pumped by Tether which is drawing funds away from BCH. If you suffer from ADHD and don't know how to play the waiting game then get out while you can- BCH could drop to $300 again next week and break your fragile little egos.
I bought into Bitcoin Cash in mid August at $700. Once Jamie Dimon FUD and wallet dumps started pushing the price down to $300 I didn't lose faith. I didn't sell. I bought a little more actually. I knew this would come to pass. And last week we saw a glimpse of that. Bitcoin Cash is only just beginning to flex its muscles in the cryptosphere and investors have definitely taken notice. But don't you dare go expecting daily gains of 50% like we saw last week. Look to the horizon.
Peace
submitted by kshuaib734 to btc [link] [comments]

The owners of Blockstream are spending $75 million to do a "controlled demolition" of Bitcoin by manipulating the Core devs & the Chinese miners. This is cheap compared to the $ trillions spent on the wars on Iraq & Libya - who also defied the Fed / PetroDollar / BIS private central banking cartel.

At this point, that's really the simplest "Occam's razor" explanation for Blockstream's "irrational" behavior.
Once you let go of your irrational belief that Blockstream's owners actually want to get a "return" on their $75 million investment, from "innovations" such as sidechains technology (Lightning Network - LN) - only then will you be able to see that Blockstream's apparently "irrational" behavior is actually perfectly rational.
They say their goal is to "get rich" from LN. And if you believe that, I have a Dogecoin I'd like to sell you.
What are the real goals of Blockstream's owners?
Blockstream's owners don't give a fuck about the Rube Goldberg vaporware which some focus group christened "the Lightning Network". That name is just there to placate the masses of noobs who congregate on /bitcoin.
The owners of Blockstream are laughing at Adam Back as he continues to labor in isolation, the stereotypical math PhD who is clueless about economics, toiling away creating a slow, overpriced, centralized "level 2" payment layer on top of Bitcoin - a complicated contraption which may never work. They have neutralized him - but meanwhile, he thinks he's a rock star now, as "CEO of Blockstream". Little does he know he is the worst "collaborator" of all.
Investors are risk-averse
If Blockstream's owners really wanted to get rich from LN, do you really think they would freeze the "max blocksize" at 1 MB for the next year, when this 1-year freeze obviously risks destroying Bitcoin itself (along with their investment)?
Investors are not stupid - and they are risk-averse. They know that if there's no Bitcoin, then there's no Lightning - so their $75 million investment would go out the window.
And all the "Core" devs have actually gone on the record stating (in their less-guarded moments, or before they signed their employment contracts with Blockstream) that 2 MB blocks would work fine - even 3-4 MB blocks. Empirical research by miners has shown that 3-4 MB blocks - or even bigger - would work fine right now.
So why aren't the Blockstream investors pressuring the Core devs to go to 2 MB now, to remove the risk of Bitcoin failing?
If Blockstream did the "rational" thing and agreed to 2 MB now, the price would shoot up, the community would heal, innovation would start happening again. Bitcoin would proper, and Blockstream's investors would have a good chance at making a "return" on their investment.
For some reason, Blockstream's investors are trying to stop all this from happening. So we have to look for a different explanation. If the owners of Blockstream don't want to get rich from the Lightning Network, then what do they really want?
The simplest explanation is that the real risk which Blockstream's investors are "averse" to is the possibility of trillions of dollars in legacy fiat suddenly plunging in relative value, if Bitcoin were to shoot to the moon. They're afraid they'll lose power if Bitcoin succeeds.
In order to provide some support for this radical but simple hypothesis, we have to dive into some pretty nasty and shadowy geopolitics.
What do the wars on Iraq and Syria, JPMorgan's naked short selling of silver, and the book "Confessions of an Economic Hit Man" all have in common?
Whenever a currency tries to compete with the Fed / Petrollar / BIS [1] private central banking cartel, the legacy fiat power élite destroys that currency (if the currency has a central point of control - which Bitcoin does have: the Core devs, the Chinese miners, and Theymos).
[1] BIS = the Bank for International Settlements, often referred to as "the central bank of central banks"
Trillions of dollars were spent to take down the central banks of Iraq and Libya, because they defied the hegemony of the Fed / Petrodollar / BIS private central banking cartel.
https://duckduckgo.com/?q=ellen+brown+iraq+libya+bis
And while you're googling, you might want to look up whistleblower Andrew Maguire (who exposed how JPMorgan uses naked short selling to "dump" nonexistent silver in order to prevent the USDollar from collapsing).
https://duckduckgo.com/?q=andrew+maguire+jpmorgan
And you might also want to look up John Perkins, whose book "Confessions of an Economic Hit Man" is another major eye-opener about how "the Washington consensus" manages to rule the world by printing fiat backed by violence and justified by "experts" and propaganda.
https://duckduckgo.com/?q=john+perkins+confessions+economic+hit+man
That's just how the world works - although you have to do a bit of research to discover those unpleasant facts.
So for the legacy fiat power élite, $75 million to take down Bitcoin (and maintain their power) is chump change in comparison.
You all knew that "they" were going to try to destroy Bitcoin, didn't you?
Even Jamie Dimon practically admitted as much.
https://duckduckgo.com/?q=jamie+dimon+bitcoin
Did you really think they would be clumsy enough to try to ban it outright?
Private central bankers run this planet, and they have never hesitated to use their lethal combination of guns, debt and psyops to maintain their power. They pay for the wars, they keep people enslaved to debt, and they dumb down the population so nobody knows what's really going on.
Print up a trillion dollars here, kill a million people there, brainwash everyone with censorship and propaganda. That's their modus operandi.
So we shouldn't be surprised if they they ruthlessly and covertly try to take down Bitcoin. They have the means and the motivation.
It was only a matter of time before they identified the three weakest centralized points in the Bitcoin system:
And so that's where they applied the pressure.
I'm sorry to be rude, but all three of those players listed above are idiot savants / sitting ducks up against the full-spectrum of covert dirty tricks deployed by the legacy fiat power élite - whether it's money, ego-stroking, or pretending to go along with their crazy cypherpunk beliefs that Bitcoin will only prosper as long as it remains small enough to run a node on a dial-up internet on a Raspberri Pi in Luke-Jr's basement.
So the simplest explanation is this: Blockstream is a "front company" which has been established for the purpose of performing a "controlled demolition" of Bitcoin.
So Satoshi messed up. He messed up by baking in a 1 MB constant into the code at the last minute as a clumsy anti-spam kludge - which could unfortunately only be removed via a hard fork - and which the global legacy power élite have figured how to retain via social engineering directed at clueless Core devs and clueless Chinese miners (and clueless forum moderators).
So why is the price is still fairly stable?
Heck, I'm so paranoid, I wouldn't even put it past them to try to interfere with investors who might otherwise be trying to send a signal by "voting with their feet".
In other words, several observers have commented that the only way to liberate Bitcoin from the cartel of Chinese miners and Core/Blockstream devs is to crash the price.
And many other observers are puzzled that the price isn't crashing now that Bitcoin is being strangled in its cradle by Blockstream.
Well, this wouldn't be the first time that the Fed / PetroDollar / BIS private central banking cartel sent in the "plunge protection" team to artificially prop up their fragile, centralized, permissioned currency.
https://duckduckgo.com/?q=plunge+protection+team
Who knows, they could easily have printed up a few million dollars in phoney fiat and given it to players like Jamie Dimon or Blythe Masters who probably have access to the HFT (high frequency trading) tools to keep the price exactly where they want it, for as long as they want it. Manipulating an unregulated $6 billion market would be child's play for them.
The point is, we have no idea who is buying bitcoins at this price right now. Or what their motives are.
I know that if I were part of the legacy fiat power élite, this is exactly what I'd be doing now: buy off the devs, pressure the miners, encourage the censors, and play with the price - so nobody knows what the hell is going on. Prevent the price from crashing for the next year (so the community won't have a "smoking gun" to reject the Core devs and the Chinese miners)... and prevent it from going to the moon also (so the dollar won't look like it's crashing). Not too hard to do, especially if you have unlimited fiat at your disposal.
2016 is the perfect time to perform a "controlled demolition" on Bitcoin.
All the forces in the global economy are now aligned for a massive economic storm of epic proportions. Without Blockstream's interference, Bitcoin's price would be shooting to the moon right now, because it's the only digital asset class free of counterparty risk, compared to all the other garbage floating around in the system:
https://duckduckgo.com/?q=deutsche+bank+lehman
https://np.reddit.com/BitcoinMarkets/comments/45ogx7/daily_discussion_sunday_february_14_2016/d0015vf
https://duckduckgo.com/?q=china+capital+flight
https://duckduckgo.com/?q=NIRP+Negative+Interest+Rate+Policy
Bitcoin is one of the only safe harbors in this oncoming economic storm. So it should be skyrocketing right now - if there were no artificial constraints on its growth.
So if Blockstream were not doing a controlled demolition of Bitcoin right now by freezing the blocksize to 1 MB for the next year, then the Bitcoin price could easily go to 4,000 USD - instead languishing around 400 USD.
In other words: the USDollar would be crashing 10-fold versus Bitcoin.
The only bulwark against Bitcoin rising 10x versus the USDollar is Blockstream's stranglehold on the Core devs and the Chinese miners.
Just like the only bulwark against precious metals rising 10x versus the USDollar right now is JPMorgan's naked short selling of phoney (paper) precious metals, mainly via the SLV ETF (exchange traded fund).
https://duckduckgo.com/?q=jpmorgan+naked+short+selling+slv
(Most informed estimates say that there is 100x more "fake" or "paper" gold and silver in existence, versus "physical" gold and silver. So it's easy for JPMorgan to suppress the silver price: just naked-short-sell "paper" silver. They do this as a service to the Fed, to prop up the dollar. And your tax dollars pay for this fraud.)
The silence of the devs
Isn't it strange how not a single Blockstream dev dares to "break ranks" on the 2 MB taboo?
This unanimous code of silence among Blockstream devs speaks volumes.
Devs on open-source projects like this (particularly ones which were founded on principles of "permissionless" "decentralization") would never maintain this kind of uniform code of developer silence - especially when their precious open-source project is on the verge of failing.
Most devs are rebels - especially Bitcoin devs - ready to break ranks at the drop of a hat, and propose their brilliant ideas to save the day.
But right now - utter silence.
This bizarre code of silence which we are now seeing from the "Core" devs must be the result of some major behind-the-scenes arm-twisting by the owners of Blocsktream, who must have made it abundantly clear that any dev who attempts to provide a simple on-chain scaling solution will be severely punished - financially, legally and/or socially.
Blockstream has deliberately set Bitcoin on a suicide course right now - and all the devs there are silently complicit - and so are the Chinese miners who submissively bowed down to Blockstream's stalling "scaling" roadmap.
But I don't really blame the devs and the miners. I feel bad for them.
I'm not really "blaming" any Chinese miners for being used like this - nor am I really "blaming" devs such as Adam Back, Greg Maxwell, etc.
Nor do I really "blame" guys like Austin Hill.
And I even think guys like Theymos and Luke-Jr "mean well".
They're all just being played. They think they're doing the right thing. Their arguments are genuine and heart-felt. Wrong, but heart-felt. This is what makes them so dangerous - because they really sound sincere and convincing. This is why they are the perfect pawns for the owners of Blockstream to play like this.
Subtle coercion
We recently found out that they locked the Chinese miners in a room for 13 hours until 3 AM to force them to sign an "agreement" to never use any code from a competing Bitcoin implementation that would increase the blocksize.
https://np.reddit.com/btc/comments/46tv22/only_emperors_kings_and_dictators_demand_fealty/
Have you ever seen this kind of coercion in an open-source project - an open-source project founded on the principles of "permissionless" "decentralization" - where many of the founders were "cypherpunks"??
The miners and the devs - and Theymos - and guys like Austin Hill - all are passionate about Bitcoin, and they all believe they are doing "the right thing".
But they are being manipulated, without their knowledge, by the real power behind Blockstream.
Prisoners in a golden cage
Strange how we never get to hear what really goes on behind closed doors at Blockstream. We never get to see the PowerPoint decks, we never get to find out who said what. Blockstream's public messaging is tightly controlled.
If Bitcoin were to have a "core" dev team, it should have had something like the Mozilla Group, or the Tor Project - non-profits, who answer to the public, not to private investors. Instead we got Blockstream - a private company funded by some of the biggest players of the legacy fiat power élite. WTF?!?
If they wanted to develop sidechains and LN, then fine, they should be able to. But what they're really doing is radically changing Bitcoin itself - mainly by freezing growth at 1 MB blocks now, which is choking the system.
Depite all this, I still would not go so far as to say that the Core devs and the Chinese miners are really "traitors". At most, they are actually prisoners in a golden cage, who are not even really conscious of their own imprisonment. They're smart people - and in some ways, smart people are actually easier to fool, once you figure out what they believe in.
So this is what I really think the owners of Blockstream have done. They've figured out how to manipulate the Core devs and the Chinese miners - and they're happy that Theymos is playing along, censoring the main online forums - so they're able to move ahead with their plan to do a "controlled demolition" of Bitcoin, and it only cost them $75 million dollars.
Centralization got us into this mess.
The only reason Bitcoin is vulnerable to this kind of "controlled demolition" being performed by the owners of Blockstream is because mining operations and dev teams are centralized - thus providing a single, vulnerable point where the legacy fiat power élite could easily deploy their full-spectrum attack.
We finally have a digital asset with no counterparty risk - and they want to take it away from us, so that we continue to depend on their debt-backed, violence-backed legacy fiat.
And they're able to do this because the Core devs and the Chinese miners and Theymos were such easy gullible centralized targets.
Decentralization will get us out.
If you are a miner or a dev, and if you want Bitcoin to survive, then you must go back to the principles of permissionless decentralization.
Go dark, release some code anonymously.
Release an internal Blockstream PowerPoint deck or some internal Blockstream emails to Wikileaks, exposing what the Blockstream investors are really up to.
Otherwise, Bitcoin is probably going to fail to realize its potential - and we'll have to wait a while for truly decentralized development (and mining, and forums) to possibly create a successor someday.
If you're a hodler, it would be great if such a phoenix rising from Bitcoin would be a "spinoff" - ie, a coin bootstrapped off of the existing ledger (to preserve existing wealth, while upgrading to a new protocol for appending new blocks).
https://bitcointalk.org/index.php?topic=563972.0
But who knows.
submitted by UndergroundNews to btc [link] [comments]

Should the CFTC have allowed bitcoin to be traded on the exchange?

From the Huffington Post
Bitcoin is an ongoing insult to market economies everywhere. It shouldn’t exist ― indeed, in important respects, bitcoin doesn’t really exist at all ― but a cabal of techno-hucksters have convinced gamblers and the gullible to quite literally buy into the idea that it does.
Bitcoins, which began the year trading below $1,000, have skyrocketed to well over $16,000 since the late summer in a frenzy of pure speculative madness. “We’ve seen mortgages being taken out to buy bitcoin,” Alabama Securities Commission director Joseph Borg told CNBC on Monday. “People do credit cards, equity lines” ― taking on household debt for a wild gamble at getting rich quick.
And it’s going to get crazier before the inevitable crash. Federal regulators at the Commodity Futures Trading Commission recently allowed the Chicago Board Options Exchange and the Chicago Mercantile Exchange to begin trading bitcoin futures. The CBOE’s market opened on Sunday, and in their first day of trading, bitcoin futures accounted for about half the total trading activity on the entire exchange...
Bitcoin enthusiasts refer to it as a “cryptocurrency,” a word that has no real meaning other than “things like bitcoin.” In practice, bitcoin is something that people can buy and sell, but that has no inherent use or value itself. It’s supposed to mimic the function of money. Nobody believes there is $20 worth of paper and ink in a $20 bill, but we agree to let those green things with Andrew Jackson’s face on them serve as a store of value and a medium of exchange. Unlike actual money, however, bitcoin isn’t dependent on a government for its value ― it’s worth whatever people will buy and sell it for.
This has a certain appeal among people who long to purge government from every corner of the market and realize the libertarian millennium on Earth. But it also underscores the conceptual limits of this peculiar philosophy. Because money stripped of political legitimacy is no longer money ― it’s a commodity. You can’t have modern markets without money and there can’t be money without government. Gold coins without a government to back them up are just pieces of gold.
And bitcoin isn’t even a commodity. A commodity is a physical good that people can trade, moving it through space and time. Bitcoins are ethereal digital data points.
At the moment, people have bid up the value of those data points to preposterous levels. This is not because bitcoin performance has vastly improved over the course of the year. It is because speculators are guessing that other speculators will continue to be willing to pay higher and higher prices for no real reason.
Bitcoin, then, is money without political legitimacy, a commodity with no physical being, and an asset bubble without an asset. It is stupidity and confusion, marketed to speculators and fools.
“It’s just not a real thing,” said JPMorgan CEO Jamie Dimon in September. He also called bitcoin “a fraud.”
The decision by the Commodity Futures Trading Commission to permit bitcoin derivatives is an even greater insult to commerce than bitcoin itself. Futures allow people to speculate on the future price of a commodity. This has plenty of legitimate uses ― farmers might want to lock in a future price for their harvests, airlines might want to guarantee fuel costs, etc. But there is no reason why people should need to lock in a future price on bitcoins. The sole function of a bitcoin futures market is to expand the scale of speculation ― the same way that mortgage-backed securities and credit default swaps enabled trillions of dollars worth of speculation on subprime mortgages.
In a sign of just how unhinged this project really is, a trade association representing the world’s biggest banks wrote an open letter criticizing futures commission Chairman J. Christopher Giancarlo for greenlighting the bitcoin derivatives markets without a thorough review. Bank lobbyists do not typically advocate for tighter government oversight. But in this situation, they’re afraid their companies will get stuck holding the bag for fraudulent or absurd bets when the price of bitcoins inevitably collapses. And due to the way trades are executed and guaranteed over commodity exchanges, the banks almost certainly will.
Which brings us to the tax bill Republicans hope to soon pass. To the extent that its defenders have attempted to offer any justification for this multitrillion-dollar package of goodies for the wealthy, they’ve suggested it will spur investment in the economy, which will eventually trickle down into higher wages. Corporate executives, for their part, have made quite clear that if they receive the $1.5 trillion tax cut the GOP has set for them, they won’t invest it in new equipment or research, but simply pay out more to their shareholders.
But to some conservative economists, including George Mason University professor and Bloomberg columnist Tyler Cowen, even this isn’t cause for alarm. “What if those investors take the money and put it in a venture capital fund or invest it in some other manner? The whole point of capital markets is to recycle resources into the most profitable new opportunities,” Cowen wrote in November.
What’s then to stop rich tax-cut recipients from plowing the money into bitcoin?
Ultimately, bitcoin is just a hyper-distilled example of what is going wrong in the American economy. Corporations are currently sitting on $2 trillion in cash. The stock market is enjoying record highs. But none of these profits are doing much for ordinary families. The median household income has barely budged over the past decade. If we put more money into the financial system without directly improving the prospects for working people, there won’t be any productive place for that money to go. It will end up in purely speculative projects that could destabilize the financial system. Under conditions of extreme economic inequality, big tax cuts for the rich aren’t just unfair; they’re dangerous.
Maybe bitcoin is only a silly aberration. But I wouldn’t stake $1.5 trillion on it.
submitted by paypalthrowaway1 to AskTrumpSupporters [link] [comments]

InziderX Deutsch Whitepaper translation

InziderX Deutsch Whitepaper translation
https://preview.redd.it/vr5akfjngqh11.png?width=816&format=png&auto=webp&s=df46b40af8825022bae8cc73f4f28ee8552903ba
Abstrakt
Einführung Marktüberblick Unsere Vision
Der dezentralizierte Exchange - InziderX Grundeigenschaften Fortgeschrittene Eigenschaften Graphen und fortgeschrittene Analyse Werkzeuge Algorithmen & API Verhandlungen Die Verhandelbaren Vermögenswerte
Technologie Atomic Swap Lightning Network Market Maker Programm Wallet
Die Zukunft Aktive lernende Community Negotiators Wettkämpfe Signale Belohnungs Programm Community Abstimmung Flieg Schmetterling INC
INX Vermögenswert Nutzen Vorteile
Verkauf von INX INX Verteilung Emission Abgabehöhen Wirtschaft Belohnungen für Promotion
Fazit Kalender Team Anhang Verweise Rechtliches & Howey test Risiko
Abstrakt Satoshi Nakamoto; der Name ansich klingt schon wie ein Pseudonym. Solange seine Identität unbekannt bleibt wird es unmöglich zu verstehen sein, was seine wirklichen Absichten hinter der Veröffentlichung des Bitcoin Codes in 2009 waren. Bitcoin basiert auf zwei bereits damals existierenden Technologien: hascash und PGP und durch das hinzufügen einer Lösung für das „double expense“ Problem. Die im Genesisblock hinzugefügte Nachricht könnte ein Hinweis sein: "The Times 3 January 2009 Chancellor on Brink of Second Bailout for Banks". Hat er sein Ziel erreicht?
Einführung
Das Reich brennt, das neue Spiel in der Stadt sind die „digitalen Vermögen“. Nach dem Listing des Futures XBT war die Ankündigung offiziel. Trotz der Anschuldigungen gegenüber diesem neuen immateriellen Vermögenswert, positionieren sich die größten Spieler der alten Märkte unauffällig für diesen neuen Markt.
Am 26. Februar 2018 veröffentlichte Bloomberg einen Artikel, der behauptet, dass Circle Financial Ltd, finanziell durch die weltweit größte Investmentbank Goldman Sachs unterstützt, den Poloniex Exchange für 400 Millionen USD gekauft hat.
Die JPMorgan Bank, dessen berühmter Direktor Jamie Dimon dafür bekannt ist regelmäßig die Leute die in Bitcoin investieren zu diskreditieren und die Technology als Betrug abtut, hat kürzlich sein eigenes dezentrales System für Transaktionen, namens Quorum, veröffentlich – eine modifizierte Version von Ethereum.
Blythe Master, eine nennenswerte Person in der Investmentwelt, wurde CEO der Digital Asset Holding LLC in 2015, eine finanz-technologische Firma die 2014 eröffnet wurde, welche blockchain-basierte Technologien und inanzielle Services wie zum Beispiel Marktinfrastruktur Providers, Exchanges und Banken für die gesamte nvestmentindustrie entwickelt.
Ripple und sein wohlhabender Direktor präsentieren sich bereits als Bitcoin für die Banken.
Für ein aufmerksames Auge gibt es bereits genug Beweise und alles was man machen muss ist zwischen den Zeilen zu lesen um zu wissen was als nächstes kommt.
Nach dem Crash des Immobilienmarkts in 2008 und die Rettung der Banken durch das FED, ist der Dow-Jones-Index bereits um mehr als 300% von seinem Tief von 6626 in 2008 zu einem Hoch von 26 667 in 2018 gestiegen. Der Heng Send um 200% von 10600 zu 33642, der DAX um 125% von 3458 zu 7781 und der Nekkei um 245% von 6988 zu 24171. Diese parabolischen Anstiege wurden durch öffentliche Fonds finanziert aber entstanden hauptsächlich durch die Verdünnung des Wertes der weltweiten Währungen.
Der USD, so wie der Denarius zu Zeiten der Römer, stirbt durch die Inflation. Tatsächlich haben alle weltweiten Währungen nurnoch 5% der Kaufkraft von vor 100 Jahren, wenn nicht sogar weniger. Aber wenn der Preis der Devisen nicht dramatisch fällt, da alle Länder das gleiche Spiel spielen, ist es schwierig die wirkliche Kaufkraft zu bestimmen.
Der Währungskrieg ist sehr real und die Nebeneffekte sind desaströs. In Indien informierte die Regierung die Bevölkerung nur 4 Stunden zuvor über die Zerstörung aller 500 und 1000 Rupie Scheine, welche 80% der Scheine ausmacht. Dadurch lief die gesamte Bevölkerung in eine Sackgasse.
Nachdem das Geld was man in den Währungsmarkt hätte investieren können nun verdünnt und aufgeblasen ist wird nun nach einem neuen Spielort gesucht; die alte Erde ist verbrannt und leer.
Tatsächlich ist die 70% Korrektur von BTC im Januar 2018 ein perfekter Einstieg für eine langwierige Investition und es gibt keinen weiteren Grund noch länger damit zu warten. Man könnte fast meinen, dass diese Korrektur erwünscht war.
Am Anfang von 2017 war der Marktwert der digitalen Vermögen ungefähr 27 Milliarden USD und mitte 2017 ca. 180 Milliarden USD. In 2018 stieg er bis auf 800 Milliarden USD an und mehr als 325,000 Transaktionen werden von der Bitcoin Blockchain pro Tag verarbeitet.
Das tägliche Volumen des New York Stock Exchanges ist ungefähr 75 Millionen USD in Transaktionen, das Forex Handelsvolumen beträgt in etwa 4.5 Milliarden USD.
Wenn wir bedenken, dass ein Teil des Volumens der traditionellen Märkte nach und nach in diesen neuen Markt transferiert werden wird, ist dies nur der Anfang. Und für die, die glauben, dass ein Aktienmarkt Crash bevorsteht, mach diese Aussage nur noch mehr Sinn.
https://drive.google.com/file/d/1wvG8kDp9Po1GEaLqLNiIoHih7vXG6CyM/view?usp=sharing #InziderX #Exchange #ico https://inziderx.io/
#InziderX #Exchange #ico https://inziderx.io/
submitted by InziderX to u/InziderX [link] [comments]

FUD From All Sides: In Defense of CME's Bitcoin Futures Plan

https://www.coindesk.com/fud-sides-defense-cmes-bitcoin-futures-plan/
William Mallers, Jr. started First American Discount Corporation with his father in 1984, eventually building it into the third-largest discount futures brokerage. He sold it in 2001 to Man Financial and then retired.
In this opinion piece, Mallers argues CME Group's plan to offer bitcoin futures will benefit the futures trading industry and the bitcoin community alike – notwithstanding hand-wringing in both worlds about the idea.
I'm a member of the Chicago Mercantile Exchange. I've also been a bitcoiner since 2013. So, when CME Group announced its intention to launch bitcoin futures in the coming weeks, I thought, "Great! Way to go, CME."
The first exchange to offer a futures contract on bitcoin is good news for my CME friends: more trading volume and and speculative opportunities. And it's also good for my bitcoin friends: the legitimacy and access is sure to help with adoption and higher bitcoin prices. Win-win! Right?
Well, that wasn't quite the response I got.
Instead I heard just about every negative stereotype about both futures trading and bitcoin, from both communities. Let's try to put these misperceptions to rest.
'Tulips' in 5,4,3...
First, there’s this from the futures industry’s most widely read blog, John Lothian News:
"The risk of bitcoin is in its history and the cloud surrounding its creation and early fraudulent days. Who is Satoshi? Where is he today? What happened at Mt. Gox? Is it still used to launder money? Why won't China let people trade bitcoin and what does this have to do with money laundering or capital controls?"
Good Lord. If you've been in enough arguments with bitcoin skeptics you know what's coming after the drug-dealing, money-laundering slam, right? Next up: the tulip-bulb analogy.
Sure enough, Lothian says, "I don’t want to be on the wrong side of history. But the history I am looking at is … 1636-37. That was the peak of tulipmania."
And that, my friends, is why I spent my first two years in bitcoin not sharing my passion with any non-bitcoiners. "Bitcoin? Never heard of it."
But because I have benefited from all the hard work that others have done to advance this project – hosting meetups, dispelling misinformation – and all I've done is log into my account and click "Buy," I thought I'd try to do my part.
A margin clerk's dream
Here's what I wrote to Lothian (a former employee at the futures brokerage I ran), and maybe it will help you with your bitcoin futures doubters:
"Hey John, it's Junior from your old FADC [First American Discount Corporation] days and I’ll be glad to help you understand bitcoin.
"But first – recall how you used to try to collect margin money by first asking the customer to provide a contact at his bank who could confirm that he had sufficient funds in his account and that he had initiated the wire. Why did we have you do that? Because we knew we wouldn’t get the money until the next day; his bank, while debiting his account immediately, would wait until the end of the day to wire us the money (unless he stopped the wire) and our bank wouldn’t credit us until mid-morning the next day, at the earliest.
"Now, imagine, instead of that 24-hour headache, your under-margined customer simply waved his cell phone at our FADC QR code and we got the money within 10 minutes, or at most a few hours. Bitcoin is a margin clerk's dream come true: near-instant peer-to-peer value transfer! It's easy to see why Jamie Dimon doesn’t like it, but a former margin clerk? You should be loving this technology and cheering for its adoption!
"I know having an asset protected by the computing power of a globally distributed network doesn't feel as secure as having armed guards protecting a bank vault, but if you get some time, there are websites that estimate the cost of amassing enough computing power to defraud the bitcoin network. This site estimates about $1 billion in electricity per day, plus over $1 billion in equipment, to counterfeit one transaction. In other words, it would be way cheaper for the Hunt brothers to corner today’s silver market than it would be for me to con an online retailer like Overstock into sending me free patio furniture. It's called a '51% attack' because I’d need to control a majority of the network hashing power to get a consensus mechanism to accept my phony accounting.
"Bernie Madoff-style cons are hard to pull off; I need years to earn my victims' trust, I have to get a reputable accounting firm to bless my forged statements, etc ... but Madoff's con was far easier than going undetected while amassing billions' worth of computing power. Plus, since new bitcoins are awarded to the miners proportionate to their computational contribution, if I did have that much computing power, I may as well amass bitcoins the honest way, right?
"That's one of the fun insights into this project: it manages to align all participants through economic incentive."
Overwhelming demand
When Terry Duffy, CME's CEO, says it's offering bitcoin futures in response to customer demand, I'm sure he’s right.
I know from writing brochures for commodity trading advisors that money managers want non-correlated assets. That's the only reason they own gold.
When the stock market tanks or a terrorist attack happens, that's when gold rallies. After 9/11, the stock market dropped over 7 percent, but gold spiked.
Bitcoin, like gold, is a perfect non-correlated asset to add to an investment portfolio. I am not surprised that there is such overwhelming demand for bitcoin futures from traders. Now, every trader is going to have the option to invest right there on their screen without having to do the onerous work of buying and securing bitcoin itself.
Risk controls
As for claims that CME futures trading will put the exchange at risk, they are overblown.
CME clearing privilege requires a large amount of capital. If a member's capital level drops below the threshold required to clear, the CME removes customer accounts and places them with a firm that has the capital to support them. Again, customers come first.
Stock index futures functioned as designed during the 1987 crash, grain futures likewise during the 1988 drought, currencies during the high volatility after the Plaza Accord. Consider this: prior to 1982, if you’d predicted where the most successful stock index contract would launch, you’d guess probably the New York Stock Exchange, right? But S&P 500 Index Futures launched at the Chicago exchanges next to the pork-belly pit, U.S. Treasury futures next to the soybean pit.
CME has done its homework on bitcoin; it's well aware of bitcoin's volatile price history and has the experience and controls in place to clear bitcoin futures.
Amazing, isn't it? The exchange that offers risk-management products should avoid bitcoin because it’s "risky?" Huh? I’ve never seen anything like bitcoin that inspires such lame arguments from its opponents.
This ain't Wall Street
Then, there's all the bitcoiners' FUD: "Here comes Wall Street to drive the price of bitcoin down, manipulate the market and ruin it for us!"
Suffice it to say, for many of the same reasons I gave above, I don’t believe that to be true.
Keep in mind that CME is not Wall Street. The Chicago exchanges have an ethos like bitcoin's: transparency, security, independence and accountability.
To all the people hand-wringing on both sides, let's just see how this plays out. I have decades of experience with the Chicago exchanges and feel reasonably certain that you all are wasting your breath and paying too much for full-page ads in print newspapers.
Let's get this thing to the moon!
submitted by BitcoinAlways to Bitcoin [link] [comments]

Goldman Sachs last year, Tether, China, India, "necessary correction" etc this year.

China went batshit last year, followed closely by Jamie Dimon spraying shit on every news outlet in the world, saying he would fire any trader that bought bitcoin. This was of course followed closely by Jamie Dimon being busted buying BTC en-masse, and almost immediately afterwards, we started going for a new ATH, and FOMO news being spread.
This year, we see an agressive downsale, that is honestly unparallelled from what I've ever seen in the stock market, and the crypto world so far. Then suddenly, the US government swoops in to save the day after a ton of weak hands fold, and sell their btc for pennies on the dollar.
Now, I don't like wearing a tinfoil hat, but I don't really believe in coincidences that looks more like patterns..
P.S Bear Trap incoming.
submitted by SoNElgen to CryptoCurrency [link] [comments]

If you are new here, and wondering if it's ok to buy when the price is "high", you may enjoy this fun and informative introduction to Bitcoin.

Buy now, always Hodl in FUD times (Bitcoin has "died" many times, but Moneybadger don't care, buy the dips and never panic-sell, stuff like: "China ban Bitcoin...again!" will keep happening again and again. Here's Bitcoin's response to Jamie Dimon. All Central Powers look silly trying to control or ban it. Learn from history.
Also relax, you are actually an early adopter if you start investing today, mentally prepare yourself for healthy and expected market volatility/dips/corrections/"crashes" (check out this amazing 'Corrections Trends Perspective') and remember all this regarding Bitcoin investment:
Never try to time the market. Dollar cost average by buying what you can afford to lose every week.
It is always a good time to buy Bitcoin if you are hodling long term and not just for day trading, so this is a great strategy. Remember that Bitcoin has practically been up most of the time, and the road to the moon is paved with minor corrections (Bitcoin is never really "down" when you zoom-out).
Everybody parroting: "The bitcoin bubble is about to pop" since 2009, don't know that bitcoin is a decentralized system with mathematically fixed, deflatioary and limited supply currency and its growth is exponential.
So is not farfetched to say that it will be at 100,000 by 2020, since it came from less than $1 to $5,000 in less than 10 years, and it hasn't even hit the bottom part of the exponential 'S-Curve' of adoption. Check out this great 2017 MIT study: "The Cryptocurrency Market Is Growing Exponentially". Patience pays, don't listen to the "Expert Analysts on MSM".
Bitcoin is a Moneybadger that get's stronger and immunized with every new attack and this broad picture of its price since infancy (1 year candles on a logarithmic scale) shows Bitcoin growth is not in a "bubble" right now. Learn the difference between Inflation (dollar) and Deflation (Bitcoin) and just take a look at the fiat >20 trillion (and growing fast) debt clock to get a visual shock of unlimited fiat supply (vs limited Bitcoin/Gold supply).
Bitcoin has outperformed every other currency, commodity, stock and asset since its inception in 2009: "2017: Bitcoin Beats Stocks, Bonds, And Gold, Again”. Bitcoin, the Moneybadger, is the first unseizable store of value in human history, unlike gold, equities, or fiat, it can't be confiscated if stored correctly. How banks think blockchain will disrupt their industry.
Also, remember its fixed, limited supply of 21 million coins ever, there are just ~4.5 million (~20%) bitcoins left to be mined till 2140 and the production will keep decreasing ("halving") every 4 years till then. So, remember this and don't wait for the price to drop significantly again, because you could be waiting forever:
“The best time to buy bitcoin was a few years ago, the second best time is always now”.
Don't be -- this guy
Here is a good start:
"Introduction to Bitcoin" - Andreas Antonopoulos
Playlists on Andreas own YT channel
Check out this great articles:
"What Gave Bitcoin Its Value?"
"How do Bitcoins have value?"
How to buy Bitcoin?
Where to buy Bitcoin list
Excellent "Crypto 101" by stos313)
Where to use Bitcoin list by Bitcoin-Yoda
Edit: Formatting
submitted by readish to Bitcoin [link] [comments]

Bitcoin Is Free Speech: Why Jamie Dimon Was Wrong and ... Jamie Dimon: J.P.Morgan Chase & Co. - YouTube Jamie Dimon talks bitcoin JAMIE DIMON VS BITCOIN!!... A Short Story Jamie Dimon testifies about blockchain, cryptocurrency and ...

Bitcoin, Ethereum and other cryptocurrencies dipped today after JP Morgan chief Jamie Dimon called Bitcoin a “fraud that will eventually blow up” at a New York conference. He said it is “worse than Tulip Mania” and “only for drug dealers, murderers and people living in North Korea or Venezuela.” He even threatened to fire any of his employees that would dare to trade and profit ... Dimon still maintains that the emphasis in the financial sector should remain on the blockchain, rather than Bitcoin which he maintains, he has unintentionally become the spokesperson against, arguing, “I didn’t want to be the spokesperson against Bitcoin. I just don’t give a ….., that’s the point…Blockchain is real, it’s a technology, but Bitcoin isn’t the same as a fiat ... Oh the irony. JPMorgan Chase CEO Jamie Dimon has been widely reported as bashing Bitcoin and cryptocurrency in general. Speaking at CNBC‘s Delivering Alpha conference, Dimon was asked a direct ... JPMorgan, Jamie Dimon, Bitcoin and Fraud “Fraud” has long been a word eponymous with JPMorgan. And now, ever since CEO Jamie Dimon made his controversial claims about Bitcoin, the technology has become intertwined with JPMorgan, Dimon, and the subject of fraud. Dimon made a few confused accusations about Bitcoin, claiming it is a “novelty” that is “worth nothing” and predicted that ... By Aaron Brown JPMorgan Chase & Co. Chief Executive Officer Jamie Dimon made news last week by criticizing bitcoin. Asking a bank CEO what he thinks of bitcoin is like asking the head of the post office what he thinks of e-mail. In a perfect world, Dimon would note the reasons why people use the cryptocurrency along with the dangers, and explain how JPMorgan is working to provide its customers ...

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Bitcoin Is Free Speech: Why Jamie Dimon Was Wrong and ...

JPMorgan Chase CEO Jamie Dimon tells CNN Business’ Christine Romans how he expects the US economic recovery to look as well as his plans for the New York Job... Jamie Dimon Says "Bitcoin Investors Will Pay the Price" The CEO of JPMorgan Chase & Co. Jamie Dimon comments on bitcoin during a panel discussion at the annual meeting of the Institute of ... What happens when one of the worlds most revered, powerful, to big to fail, establishment connected bankers picks a fight with the Open source Bitcoin Blockc... The CEOs of America's largest banks testify on Capitol Hill about how the industry has transformed in the 10 years following the financial crisis. » Subscrib... J.P. Morgan CEO Jamie Dimon said that governments will "close [bitcoin] down." In the U.S., thankfully, that can never happen because bitcoin is protected by...

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