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[META] New to PC Building? - September 2018 Edition

Intro

You've heard from all your gaming friends/family or co-workers that custom PCs are the way to go. Or maybe you've been fed up with your HP, Dell, Acer, Gateway, Lenovo, etc. pre-builts or Macs and want some more quality and value in your next PC purchase. Or maybe you haven't built a PC in a long time and want to get back into the game. Well, here's a good place to start.

Instructions

  1. Make a budget for your PC (e.g., $800, $1000, $1250, $1500, etc.).
  2. Decide what you will use your PC for.
    • For gaming, decide what games and at what resolution and FPS you want to play at.
    • For productivity, decide what software you'll need and find the recommended specs to use those apps.
    • For a bit of both, your PC build should be built on the HIGHEST specs recommended for your applications (e.g., if you only play FortNite and need CPU power for CFD simulations, use specs recommended for CFD).
    Here are some rough estimates for builds with entirely NEW parts:
    1080p 60FPS ultra-settings modern AAA gaming: ~$1,200
    1440p 60FPS high/ultra-settings modern AAA gaming: ~$1,600
    1080p 144FPS ultra-settings modern AAA gaming: $2,000
    4K 50FPS medium/high-settings modern AAA gaming: > $2,400
    It's noted that some compromises (e.g., lower settings and/or resolution) can be made to achieve the same or slightly lower gaming experience within ±15% of the above prices. It's also noted that you can still get higher FPS on older or used PCs by lowering settings and/or resolution AND/OR buying new/used parts to upgrade your system. Make a new topic about it if you're interested.
    Also note that AAA gaming is different from e-sport games like CSGO, DOTA2, FortNite, HOTS, LoL, Overwatch, R6S, etc. Those games have lower requirements and can make do with smaller budgets.
  3. Revise your budget AND/OR resolution and FPS until both are compatible. Compare this to the recommended requirements of the most demanding game on your list. For older games, you might be able to lower your budget. For others, you might have to increase your budget.
    It helps to watch gaming benchmarks on Youtube. A good example of what you're looking for is something like this (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9eLxSOoSdjY). Take note of the resolution, settings, FPS, and the specs in the video title/description; ask yourself if the better gaming experience is worth increasing your budget OR if you're okay with lower settings and lowering your budget. Note that you won't be able to see FPS higher than 60FPS for Youtube videos; something like this would have to be seen in-person at a computer shop.
  4. Make a build on https://ca.pcpartpicker.com/. If you still have no idea how to put together parts, start here (http://www.logicalincrements.com/) to get an understanding of PC part tiers. If you want more info about part explanations and brief buying tips, see the next section below.
  5. Click on the Reddit logo button next to Markup, copy and paste the generated text (in markup mode if using new Reddit), and share your build for review!
  6. Consider which retailer to buy your parts from. Here's a table comparing different retailers: https://docs.google.com/spreadsheets/d/1L8uijxuoJH4mjKCjwkJbCrKprCiU8CtM15mvOXxzV1s/edit?usp=sharing
  7. Buy your parts! Use PCPP above to send you e-mail alerts on price drops or subscribe to /bapcsalescanada for deals.
    You can get parts from the following PC retailers in alphabetical order:
  8. After procuring your parts, it's time to build. Use a good Youtube tutorial like this (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=IhX0fOUYd8Q) that teach BAPC fundamentals, but always refer to your product manuals or other Youtube tutorials for part-specific instructions like CPU mounting, radiator mounting, CMOS resetting, etc. If it everything still seems overwhelming, you can always pay a computer shop or a friend/family member to build it for you.
    It might also be smart to look up some first-time building mistakes to avoid:
  9. Share your experience with us.
  10. If you have any other questions, use the search bar first. If it's not there, make a topic.

BAPC News (Last Updated - 2018/09/20)

CPU

https://www.tomshardware.com/news/intel-9000-series-cpu-faq,37743.html
Intel 9000 CPUs (Coffee Lake Refresh) will be coming out in Q4. With the exception of i9 (8-core, 12 threads) flagship CPUs, the i3, i5, and i7 lineups are almost identical to their Intel 8000 (Coffee Lake) series, but slightly clocked faster. If you are wondering if you should upgrade to the newer CPU on the same tier (e.g., i5-8400 to i5-9400), I don't recommend that you do as you will only see marginal performance increases.

Mobo

https://www.anandtech.com/show/13135/more-details-on-intels-z390-chipset-exposed
Z370s will now be phased out for Z390s boards, which will natively support Intel 9000 CPUs (preferably i5-9600K, i7-9700K, and i9-9900K).

GPU

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=WDrpsv0QIR0
RTX 2080 and 2080 Ti benchmarks are out; they provide ~10 and ~20 frames better than the 1080 Ti and also feature ray tracing (superior lighting and shadow effects) which is featured in only ~30 games so far (i.e., not supported a lot); effectively, they provide +25% more performance for +70% increased cost. My recommendation is NOT to buy them unless you need it for work or have lots of disposable income. GTX 1000 Pascal series are still relevant in today's gaming specs.

Part Explanations

CPU

The calculator part. More GHz is analogous to fast fingers number crunching in the calculator. More cores is analogous to having more calculators. More threads is analogous to having more filing clerks piling more work for the calculator to do. Microarchitectures (core design) is analogous to how the internal circuit inside the calculator is designed (e.g., AMD FX series are slower than Intel equivalents even with higher OC'd GHz speeds because the core design is subpar). All three are important in determining CPU speed.
In general, higher GHz is more important for gaming now whereas # cores and threads are more important for multitasking like streaming, video editing, and advanced scientific/engineering computations. Core designs from both AMD and Intel in their most recent products are very good now, but something to keep in mind.

Overclocking

The basic concept of overclocking (OCing) is to feed your CPU more power through voltage and hoping it does calculations faster. Whether your parts are good overclockers depends on the manufacturing process of your specific part and slight variations in materials and manufacturing process will result in different overclocking capability ("silicon lottery"). The downside to this is that you can void your warranties because doing this will produce excess heat that will decrease the lifespan of your parts AND that there is a trial-and-error process to finding OC settings that are stable. Unstable OC settings result in computer freezes or random shut-offs from excess heat. OCing will give you extra performance often for free or by investing in a CPU cooler to control your temperatures so that the excess heat will not decrease your parts' lifespans as much. If you don't know how to OC, don't do it.

Current Products

Intel CPUs have higher GHz than AMD CPUs, which make them better for gaming purposes. However, AMD Ryzen CPUs have more cores and threads than their Intel equivalents. The new parts are AMD Ryzen 3, 5, or 7 2000 series or Intel i3, i5, or i7 8000 series (Coffee Lake). Everything else is outdated.
If you want to overclock on an AMD system, know that you can get some moderate OC on a B350/B450 with all CPUs. X370/X470 mobos usually come with better VRMs meant for OCing 2600X, 2700, and 2700X. If you don't know how to OC, know that the -X AMD CPUs have the ability to OC themselves automatically without manually settings. For Intel systems, you cannot OC unless the CPU is an unlocked -K chip (e.g., i3-8350K, i5-8600K, i7-8700K, etc.) AND the motherboard is a Z370 mobo. In general, it is not worth getting a Z370 mobo UNLESS you are getting an i5-8600K and i7-8700K.

CPU and Mobo Compatibility

Note about Ryzen 2000 CPUs on B350 mobos: yes, you CAN pair them up since they use the same socket. You might get an error message on PCPP that says that they might not be compatible. Call the retailer and ask if the mobo you're planning on buying has a "Ryzen 2000 Series Ready" sticker on the box. This SHOULD NOT be a problem with any mobos manufactured after February 2018.
Note about Intel 9000 CPUs on B360 / Z370 mobos: same as above with Ryzen 2000 CPUs on B350 or X370 boards.

CPU Cooler (Air / Liquid)

Air or liquid cooling for your CPU. This is mostly optional unless heavy OCing on AMD Ryzen CPUs and/or on Intel -K and i7-8700 CPUs.
For more information about air and liquid cooling comparisons, see here:

Motherboard/mobo

Part that lets all the parts talk to each other. Comes in different sizes from small to big: mITX, mATX, ATX, and eATX. For most people, mATX is cost-effective and does the job perfectly. If you need more features like extra USB slots, go for an ATX. mITX is for those who want a really small form factor and are willing to pay a premium for it. eATX mobos are like ATX mobos except that they have more features and are bigger - meant for super PC enthusiasts who need the features.
If you are NOT OCing, pick whatever is cheap and meets your specs. I recommend ASUS or MSI because they have RMA centres in Canada in case it breaks whereas other parts are outside of Canada like in the US. If you are OCing, then you need to look at the quality of the VRMs because those will greatly influence the stability and lifespan of your parts.

Memory/RAM

Part that keeps Windows and your software active. Currently runs on the DDR4 platform for new builds. Go for dual channel whenever possible. Here's a breakdown of how much RAM you need:
AMD Ryzen CPUs get extra FPS for faster RAM speeds (ideally 3200MHz) in gaming when paired with powerful video cards like the GTX 1070. Intel Coffee Lake CPUs use up a max of 2667MHz for B360 mobos. Higher end Z370 mobos can support 4000 - 4333MHz RAM depending on the mobo, so make sure you shop carefully!
It's noted that RAM prices are highly inflated because of the smartphone industry and possibly artificial supply shortages. For more information: https://www.extremetech.com/computing/263031-ram-prices-roof-stuck-way

Storage

Part that store your files in the form of SSDs and HDDs.

Solid State Drives (SSDs)

SSDs are incredibly quick, but are expensive per TB; they are good for booting up Windows and for reducing loading times for gaming. For an old OEM pre-built, upgrading the PC with an SSD is the single greatest speed booster you can do to your system. For most people, you want to make sure the SSD you get is NOT DRAM-less as these SSDs do not last as long as their DRAM counterparts (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ybIXsrLCgdM). It is also noted that the bigger the capacity of the SSD, the faster they are. SSDs come in four forms:
The 2.5" SATA form is cheaper, but it is the old format with speeds up to 550MB/s. M.2 SATA SSDs have the same transfer speeds as 2.5" SATA SSDs since they use the SATA interface, but connect directly to the mobo without a cable. It's better for cable management to get an M.2 SATA SSD over a 2.5" SATA III SSD. M.2 PCI-e SSDs are the newest SSD format and transfer up to 4GB/s depending on the PCI-e lanes they use (e.g., 1x, 2x, 4x, etc.). They're great for moving large files (e.g., 4K video production). For more info about U.2 drives, see this post (https://www.reddit.com/bapccanada/comments/8jxfqs/meta_new_to_pc_building_may_2018_edition/dzqj5ks/). Currently more common for enterprise builds, but could see some usage in consumer builds.

Hard Disk Drives (HDDs)

HDDs are slow with transfer speeds of ~100MB/s, but are cheap per TB compared to SSDs. We are now at SATA III speeds, which have a max theoretical transfer rate of 600MB/s. They also come in 5400RPM and 7200RPM forms. 5400RPM uses slightly less power and are cheaper, but aren't as fast at dealing with a large number of small files as 7200RPM HDDs. When dealing with a small number of large files, they have roughly equivalent performance. It is noted that even a 10,000RPM HDD will still be slower than an average 2.5" SATA III SSD.

Others

SSHDs are hybrids of SSDs and HDDs. Although they seem like a good combination, it's much better in all cases to get a dedicated SSD and a dedicated HDD instead. This is because the $/speed better for SSDs and the $/TB is better for HDDs. The same can be said for Intel Optane. They both have their uses, but for most users, aren't worth it.

Overall

I recommend a 2.5" or M.2 SATA ≥ 250GB DRAM SSD and a 1TB or 2TB 7200RPM HDD configuration for most users for a balance of speed and storage capacity.

Video Card/GPU

Part that runs complex calculations in games and outputs to your monitor and is usually the most expensive part of the budget. The GPU you pick is dictated by the gaming resolution and FPS you want to play at.
In general, all video cards of the same product name have almost the same non-OC'd performance (e.g., Asus Dual-GTX1060-06G has the same performance as the EVGA 06G-P4-6163-KR SC GAMING). The different sizes and # fans DO affect GPU OCing capability, however. The most important thing here is to get an open-air video card, NOT a blower video card (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0domMRFG1Rw). The blower card is meant for upgrading pre-builts where case airflow is limited.
For cost-performance, go for the NVIDIA GTX cards because of the cryptomining industry that has inflated AMD RX cards. Bitcoin has taken a -20% hit since January's $10,000+ as of recently, but the cryptomining industry is still ongoing. Luckily, this means prices have nearly corrected itself to original MSRP in 2016.
In general:
Note that if your monitor has FreeSync technology, get an AMD card. If your monitor has G-Sync, get a NVIDIA card. Both technologies allow for smooth FPS gameplay. If you don't have either, it doesn't really matter which brand you get.
For AMD RX cards, visit https://www.pcworld.com/article/3197885/components-graphics/every-amd-radeon-rx-graphics-card-you-can-buy-for-pc-gaming.html

New NVIDIA GeForce RTX Series

New NVIDIA 2000 RTX series have been recently announced and will be carried in stores in Q3 and Q4. Until all of the products have been fully vetted and reviewed, we cannot recommend those yet as I cannot say if they are worth what NVIDIA has marketed them as. But they will be faster than their previous equivalents and will require more wattage to use. The 2070, 2080, and 2080 Ti will feature ray tracing, which is a new feature seen in modern CG movies that greatly enhances lighting and shadow effects. At this time, < 30 games will use ray tracing (https://www.pcgamer.com/21-games-will-support-nvidias-real-time-ray-tracing-here-are-demos-of-tomb-raider-and-control/). It's also noted that the 2080 Ti is the Titan XP equivalent, which is why it's so expensive. (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Irs8jyEmmPQ) The community's general recommendation is NOT to pre-order them until we see some reviews and benchmarks from reviewers first.
Looks like a couple of benchmarks are out. While keeping other parts equal the following results were obtained(https://videocardz.com/77983/nvidia-geforce-rtx-2080-ti-and-rtx-2080-official-performance-unveiled). So the 2080 and 2080 Ti are better than last generation's 1080 Ti by ~10 and ~20 frames respectively.

Case

Part that houses your parts and protects them from its environment. Should often be the last part you choose because the selection is big enough to be compatible with any build you choose as long as the case is equal to or bigger than the mobo form factor.
Things to consider: aesthetics, case airflow, cable management, material, cooling options (radiators or # of fan spaces), # fans included, # drive bays, toolless installation, power supply shroud, GPU clearance length, window if applicable (e.g., acrylic, tempered glass), etc.
It is recommended to watch or read case reviews on Youtube to get an idea of a case's performance in your setup.

Power Supply/PSU

Part that runs your PC from the wall socket. Never go with an non-reputable/cheap brand out on these parts as low-quality parts could damage your other parts. Recommended branded PSUs are Corsair, EVGA, Seasonic, and Thermaltake, generally. For a tier list, see here (https://linustechtips.com/main/topic/631048-psu-tier-list-updated/).

Wattage

Wattage depends on the video card chosen, if you plan to OC, and/or if you plan to upgrade to a more powerful PSU in the future. Here's a rule of thumb for non-OC wattages that meet NVIDIA's recommendations:
There are also PSU wattage calculators that you can use to estimate your wattage. How much wattage you used is based on your PC parts, how much OCing you're doing, your peripherals (e.g., gaming mouse and keyboard), and how long you plan to leave your computer running, etc. It is noted that these calculators use conservative estimates, so use the outputted wattage as a baseline of how much you need. Here are the calculators (thanks, VitaminDeity).
Pick ONE calculator to use and use the recommended wattage, NOT recommended product, as a baseline of what wattage you need for your build. Note that Cooler Master and Seasonic use the exact calculator as Outervision. For more details about wattage, here are some reference videos:

Modularity

You might also see some info about modularity (non-modular, semi-modular, or fully-modular). These describe if the cables will come connected to the PSU or can be separated of your own choosing. Non-modular PSUs have ALL of the cable connections attached to the PSU with no option to remove unneeded cables. Semi-modular PSUs have separate cables for HDDs/SSDs and PCI-e connectors, but will have CPU and mobo cables attached. Modular PSUs have all of their cables separate from each other, allowing you to fully control over cable management. It is noted that with decent cooling and airflow in your case, cable management has little effect on your temperatures (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YDCMMf-_ASE).

80+ Efficiency Ratings

As for ratings (80+, 80+ bronze, 80+ gold, 80+ platinum), these are the efficiencies of your PSU. Please see here for more information. If you look purely on electricity costs, the 80+ gold PSUs will be more expensive than 80+ bronze PSUs for the average Canadian user until a breakeven point of 6 years (assuming 8 hours/day usage), but often the better performance, longer warranty periods, durable build quality, and extra features like fanless cooling is worth the extra premium. In general, the rule of thumb is 80+ bronze for entry-level office PCs and 80+ gold for mid-tier or higher gaming/workstation builds. If the price difference between a 80+ bronze PSU and 80+ gold PSU is < 20%, get the 80+ gold PSU!

Warranties

Warranties should also be looked at when shopping for PSUs. In general, longer warranties also have better PSU build quality. In general, for 80+ bronze and gold PSU units from reputable brands:
Any discrepancies are based on varied wattages (i.e., higher wattages have longer warranties) or updated warranty periods. Please refer to the specific product's warranty page for the correct information. For EVGA PSUs, see here (https://www.evga.com/support/warranty/power-supplies/). For Seasonic PSUs, see here (https://seasonic.com/support#period). For Corsair PSUs, see here (https://www.corsair.com/ca/en/warranty).
For all other PSU inquiries, look up the following review sites for the PSUs you're interested in buying:
These guys are engineering experts who take apart PSUs, analyze the quality of each product, and provide an evaluation of the product. Another great website is http://www.orionpsudb.com/, which shows which PSUs are manufactured by different OEMs.

Operating System (OS)

Windows 10

The most common OS. You can download the ISO here (https://www.microsoft.com/en-ca/software-download/windows10). For instructions on how to install the ISO from a USB drive, see here (https://docs.microsoft.com/en-us/windows-hardware/manufacture/desktop/install-windows-from-a-usb-flash-drive) or watch a video here (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=gLfnuE1unS8). For most users, go with the 64-bit version.
If you purchase a Windows 10 retail key (i.e., you buy it from a retailer or from Microsoft directly), keep in mind that you are able to transfer it between builds. So if you're building another PC for the 2nd, 3rd, etc. time, you can reuse the key for those builds PROVIDED that you deactivate your key before installing it on your new PC. These keys are ~$120.
However, if you have an OEM key (e.g., pre-builts), that key is tied specifically to your mobo. If you ever decide to upgrade your mobo on that pre-built PC, you might have to buy a new Windows 10 license. For more information, see this post (https://www.techadvisor.co.uk/feature/windows/windows-10-oem-or-retail-3665849/). The cheaper Windows 10 keys you can find on Kinguin are OEM keys; activating and deactivating these keys may require phoning an automated Microsoft activation line. Most of these keys are legitimate and cost ~$35, although Microsoft does not intend for home users to obtain this version of it. Buyer beware.
The last type of key is a volume licensing key. They are licensed in large volumes to corporate or commercial usage. You can find lots of these keys on eBay for ~$10, but if the IT department who manages these keys audit who is using these keys or if the number of activations have exceeded the number allotted on that one key, Microsoft could block that key and invalidate your license. Buyer beware.
For more information on differentiating between all three types of keys, see this page (https://www.tenforums.com/tutorials/49586-determine-if-windows-license-type-oem-retail-volume.html).
If money is tight, you can get Windows 10 from Microsoft and use a trial version of it indefinitely. However, there will be a watermark in the bottom-right of your screen until you activate your Windows key.

MacOS

If you're interested in using MacOS, look into Hackintosh builds. This will allow you to run MacOS to run on PC parts, saving you lots of money. These builds are pretty picky about part compatibility, so you might run into some headaches trying to go through with this. For more information, see the following links:

Linux

If you're interested in a free open-source OS, see the following links:
For more information, go to /linux, /linuxquestions, and /linux4noobs.

Peripherals

Monitors

Keyboards and Mice

Overall

Please note that the cost-performance builds will change daily because PC part prices change often! Some builds will have excellent cost-performance one day and then have terrible cost-performance the next. If you want to optimize cost-performance, it is your responsibility to do this if you go down this route!
Also, DO NOT PM me with PC build requests! It is in your best interests to make your own topic so you can get multiple suggestions and input from the community rather than just my own. Thanks again.

Sample Builds

Here are some sample builds that are reliable, but may not be cost-optimized builds. These builds were created on September 9, 2018; feel free to "edit this part list" and create your own builds.

Links

Helpful links to common problems below:

Contributors

Thanks to:

Housekeeping

2019/09/22
2019/09/18
Updates:
2019/09/09
Updates:
Sorry for the lack of updates. I recently got a new job where I work 12 hours/day for 7 days at a time out of the city. What little spare time I have is spent on grad school and the gym instead of gaming. So I've been pretty behind on the news and some might not be up-to-date as my standards would have been with less commitments. If I've made any mistakes, please understand it might take a while for me to correct them. Thank you!
submitted by BlackRiot to bapccanada [link] [comments]

Console gaming is hardly different from PC gaming, and much of what people say about PC gaming to put it above console gaming is often wrong.

I’m not sure about you, but for the past few years, I’ve been hearing people go on and on about PCs "superiority" to the console market. People cite various reasons why they believe gaming on a PC is “objectively” better than console gaming, often for reasons related to power, costs, ease-of-use, and freedom.
…Only problem: much of what they say is wrong.
There are many misconceptions being thrown about PC gaming vs Console gaming, that I believe need to be addressed. This isn’t about “PC gamers being wrong,” or “consoles being the best,” absolutely not. I just want to cut through some of the stuff people use to put down console gaming, and show that console gaming is incredibly similar to PC gaming. I mean, yes, this is someone who mainly games on console, but I also am getting a new PC that I will game on as well, not to mention the 30 PC games I already own and play. I’m not particularly partial to one over the other.
Now I will mainly be focusing on the PlayStation side of the consoles, because I know it best, but much of what I say will apply to Xbox as well. Just because I don’t point out many specific Xbox examples, doesn’t mean that they aren’t out there.

“PCs can use TVs and monitors.”

This one isn’t so much of a misconception as it is the implication of one, and overall just… confusing. This is in some articles and the pcmasterrace “why choose a PC” section, where they’re practically implying that consoles can’t do this. I mean, yes, as long as the ports of your PC match up with your screen(s) inputs, you could plug a PC into either… but you could do the same with a console, again, as long as the ports match up.
I’m guessing the idea here is that gaming monitors often use Displayport, as do most dedicated GPUs, and consoles are generally restricted to HDMI… But even so, monitors often have HDMI ports. In fact, PC Magazine has just released their list of the best gaming monitors of 2017, and every single one of them has an HDMI port. A PS4 can be plugged into these just as easily as a GTX 1080.
I mean, even if the monitoTV doesn’t have HDMI or AV to connect with your console, just use an adaptor. If you have a PC with ports that doesn’t match your monitoTV… use an adapter. I don’t know what the point of this argument is, but it’s made a worrying amount of times.

“On PC, you have a wide range of controller options, but on console you’re stuck with the standard controller."

Are you on PlayStation and wish you could use a specific type of controller that suits your favorite kind of gameplay? Despite what some may believe, you have just as many options as PC.
Want to play fighting games with a classic arcade-style board, featuring the buttons and joystick? Here you go!
Want to get serious about racing and get something more accurate and immersive than a controller? Got you covered.
Absolutely crazy about flying games and, like the racers, want something better than a controller? Enjoy!
Want Wii-style motion controls? Been around since the PS3. If you prefer the form factor of the Xbox One controller but you own a PS4, Hori’s got you covered. And of course, if keyboard and mouse it what keeps you on PC, there’s a PlayStation compatible solution for that. Want to use the keyboard and mouse that you already own? Where there’s a will, there’s a way.
Of course, these aren’t isolated examples, there are plenty of options for each of these kind of controllers. You don’t have to be on PC to enjoy alternate controllers.

“On PC you could use Steam Link to play anywhere in your house and share games with others.”

PS4 Remote play app on PC/Mac, PSTV, and PS Vita.
PS Family Sharing.
Using the same PSN account on multiple PS4s/Xbox Ones and PS3s/360s, or using multiple accounts on the same console.
In fact, if multiple users are on the same PS4, only one has to buy the game for both users to play it on that one PS4. On top of that, only one of them has to have PS Plus for both to play online (if the one with PS Plus registers the PS4 as their main system).
PS4 Share Play; if two people on separate PS4s want to play a game together that only one of them owns, they can join a Party and the owner of the game can have their friend play with them in the game.
Need I say more?

“Gaming is more expensive on console.”

Part one, the Software
This is one that I find… genuinely surprising. There’s been a few times I’ve mentioned that part of the reason I chose a PS4 is for budget gaming, only to told that “games are cheaper on Steam.” To be fair, there are a few games on PSN/XBL that are more expensive than they are on Steam, so I can see how someone could believe this… but apparently they forgot about disks.
Dirt Rally, a hardcore racing sim game that’s… still $60 on all 3 platforms digitally… even though its successor is out.
So does this mean you have to pay full retail for this racing experience? Nope, because disk prices.
Just Cause 3, an insane open-world experience that could essentially be summed up as “break stuff, screw physics.” And it’s a good example of where the Steam price is lower than PSN and XBL:
Not by much, but still cheaper on Steam, so cheaper on PC… Until you look at the disk prices.
See my point? Often times the game is cheaper on console because of the disk alternative that’s available for practically every console-available game. Even when the game is brand new.
Dirt 4 - Remember that Dirt Rally successor I mentioned?
Yes, you could either buy this relatively new game digitally for $60, or just pick up the disk for a discounted price. And again, this is for a game that came out 2 months ago, and even it’s predecessor’s digital cost is locked at $60. Of course, I’m not going to ignore the fact that Dirt 4 is currently (as of writing this) discounted on Steam, but on PSN it also happens to be discounted for about the same amount.
Part 2: the Subscription
Now… let’s not ignore the elephant in the room: PS Plus and Xbox Gold. Now these would be ignorable, if they weren’t required for online play (on the PlayStation side, it’s only required for PS4, but still). So yes, it’s still something that will be included in the cost of your PS4 or Xbox One/360, assuming you play online. Bummer, right?
Here’s the thing, although that’s the case, although you have to factor in this $60 cost with your console, you can make it balance out, at worst, and make it work out for you as a budget gamer, at best. As nice as it would be to not have to deal with the price if you don’t want to, it’s not like it’s a problem if you use it correctly.
Imagine going to a new restaurant. This restaurant has some meals that you can’t get anywhere else, and fair prices compared to competitors. Only problem: you have to pay a membership fee to have the sides. Now you can have the main course, sit down and enjoy your steak or pasta, but if you want to have a side to have a full meal, you have to pay an annual fee.
Sounds shitty, right? But here’s the thing: not only does this membership allow you to have sides with your meal, but it also allows you to eat two meals for free every month, and also gives you exclusive discounts for other meals, drinks, and desserts.
Let’s look at PS Plus for a minute: for $60 per year, you get:
  • 2 free PS4 games, every month
  • 2 free PS3 games, every month
  • 1 PS4/PS3 and Vita compatible game, and 1 Vita-only game, every month
  • Exclusive/Extended discounts, especially during the weekly/seasonal sales (though you don’t need PS Plus to get sales, PS Plus members get to enjoy the best sales)
  • access to online multiplayer
So yes, you’re paying extra because of that membership, but what you get with that deal pays for it and then some. In fact, let’s ignore the discounts for a minute: you get 24 free PS4 games, 24 free PS3 games, and 12 Vita only + 12 Vita compatible games, up to 72 free games every year. Even if you only one of these consoles, that’s still 24 free games a year. Sure, maybe you get games for the month that you don’t like, then just wait until next month.
In fact, let’s look at Just Cause 3 again. It was free for PS Plus members in August, which is a pretty big deal. Why is this significant? Because it’s, again, a $60 digital game. That means with this one download, you’ve balanced out your $60 annual fee. Meaning? Every free game after that is money saved, every discount after that is money saved. And this is a trend: every year, PS Plus will release a game that balances out the entire service cost, then another 23 more that will only add icing to that budget cake. Though, you could just count games as paying off PS Plus until you hit $60 in savings, but still.
All in all, PS Plus, and Xbox Gold which offers similar options, saves you money. On top of that, again, you don't need to have these to get discounts, but with these memberships, you get more discounts.
Now, I’ve seen a few Steam games go up for free for a week, but what about being free for an entire month? Not to mention that; even if you want to talk about Steam Summer Sales, what about the PSN summer sale, or again, disc sale discounts? Now a lot of research and math would be needed to see if every console gamer would save money compared to every Steam gamer for the same games, but at the very least? The costs will balance out, at worst.
Part 3, the Systems
  • Xbox and PS2: $299
  • Xbox 360 and PS3: $299 and $499, respectively
  • Xbox One and PS4: $499 and $399, respectively.
Rounded up a few dollars, that’s $1,000 - $1,300 in day-one consoles, just to keep up with the games! Crazy right? So called budget systems, such a rip-off.
Well, keep in mind that the generations here aren’t short.
The 6th generation, from the launch of the PS2 to the launch of the next generation consoles, lasted 5 years, 6 years based on the launch of the PS3 (though you could say it was 9 or 14, since the Xbox wasn’t discontinued until 2009, and the PS2 was supported all the way to 2014, a year after the PS4 was released). The 7th gen lasted 7 - 8 years, again depending on whether you count the launch of the Xbox 360 to PS3. The 8th gen so far has lasted 4 years. That’s 17 years that the console money is spread over. If you had a Netflix subscription for it’s original $8 monthly plan for that amount of time, that would be over $1,600 total.
And let’s be fair here, just like you could upgrade your PC hardware whenever you wanted, you didn’t have to get a console from launch. Let’s look at PlayStation again for example: In 2002, only two years after its release, the PS2 retail price was cut from $300 to $200. The PS3 Slim, released 3 years after the original, was $300, $100-$200 lower than the retail cost. The PS4? You could’ve either gotten the Uncharted bundle for $350, or one of the PS4 Slim bundles for $250. This all brings it down to $750 - $850, which again, is spread over a decade and a half. This isn’t even counting used consoles, sales, or the further price cuts that I didn’t mention.
Even if that still sounds like a lot of money to you, even if you’re laughing at the thought of buying new systems every several years, because your PC “is never obsolete,” tell me: how many parts have you changed out in your PC over the years? How many GPUs have you been through? CPUs? Motherboards? RAM sticks, monitors, keyboards, mice, CPU coolers, hard drives— that adds up. You don’t need to replace your entire system to spend a lot of money on hardware.
Even if you weren’t upgrading for the sake of upgrading, I’d be amazed if the hardware you’ve been pushing by gaming would last for about 1/3 of that 17 year period. Computer parts aren’t designed to last forever, and really won’t when you’re pushing them with intensive gaming for hours upon hours. Generally speaking, your components might last you 6-8 years, if you’ve got the high-end stuff. But let’s assume you bought a system 17 years ago that was a beast for it’s time, something so powerful, that even if it’s parts have degraded over time, it’s still going strong. Problem is: you will have to upgrade something eventually.
Even if you’ve managed to get this far into the gaming realm with the same 17 year old hardware, I’m betting you didn’t do it with a 17 year Operating System. How much did Windows 7 cost you? Or 8.1? Or 10? Oh, and don’t think you can skirt the cost by getting a pre-built system, the cost of Windows is embedded into the cost of the machine (why else would Microsoft allow their OS to go on so many machines).
Sure, Windows 10 was a free upgrade for a year, but that’s only half of it’s lifetime— You can’t get it for free now, and not for the past year. On top of that, the free period was an upgrade; you had to pay for 7 or 8 first anyway.
Point is, as much as one would like to say that they didn’t need to buy a new system every so often for the sake of gaming, that doesn’t mean they haven’t been paying for hardware, and even if they’ve only been PC gaming recently, you’ll be spending money on hardware soon enough.

“PC is leading the VR—“

Let me stop you right there.
If you add together the total number of Oculus Rifts and HTC Vives sold to this day, and threw in another 100,000 just for the sake of it, that number would still be under the number of PSVR headsets sold.
Why could this possibly be? Well, for a simple reason: affordability. The systems needed to run the PC headsets costs $800+, and the headsets are $500 - $600, when discounted. PSVR on the other hand costs $450 for the full bundle (headset, camera, and move controllers, with a demo disc thrown in), and can be played on either a $250 - $300 console, or a $400 console, the latter recommended. Even if you want to say that the Vive and Rift are more refined, a full PSVR set, system and all, could cost just over $100 more than a Vive headset alone.
If anything, PC isn’t leading the VR gaming market, the PS4 is. It’s the system bringing VR to the most consumers, showing them what the future of gaming could look like. Not to mention that as the PlayStation line grows more powerful (4.2 TFLOP PS4 Pro, 10 TFLOP “PS5…”), it won’t be long until the PlayStation line can use the same VR games as PC.
Either way, this shows that there is a console equivalent to the PC VR options. Sure, there are some games you'd only be able to play on PC, but there are also some games you'd only be able to play on PSVR.
…Though to be fair, if we’re talking about VR in general, these headsets don’t even hold a candle to, surprisingly, Gear VR.

“If it wasn’t for consoles holding devs back, then they would be able to make higher quality games.”

This one is based on the idea that because of how “low spec” consoles are, that when a developer has to take them in mind, then they can’t design the game to be nearly as good as it would be otherwise. I mean, have you ever seen the minimum specs for games on Steam?
GTA V
  • CPU: Intel Core 2 Quad CPU Q6600 @ 2.40GHz (4 CPUs) / AMD Phenom 9850 Quad-Core Processor (4 CPUs) @ 2.5GHz
  • Memory: 4 GB RAM
  • GPU: NVIDIA 9800 GT 1GB / AMD HD 4870 1GB (DX 10, 10.1, 11)
Just Cause 3
  • CPU: Intel Core i5-2500k, 3.3GHz / AMD Phenom II X6 1075T 3GHz
  • Memory: 8 GB RAM
  • GPU: NVIDIA GeForce GTX 670 (2GB) / AMD Radeon HD 7870 (2GB)
Fallout 4
  • CPU: Intel Core i5-2300 2.8 GHz/AMD Phenom II X4 945 3.0 GHz or equivalent
  • Memory: 8 GB RAM
  • GPU: NVIDIA GTX 550 Ti 2GB/AMD Radeon HD 7870 2GB or equivalent
Overwatch
  • CPU: Intel Core i3 or AMD Phenom™ X3 8650
  • Memory: 4 GB RAM
  • GPU: NVIDIA® GeForce® GTX 460, ATI Radeon™ HD 4850, or Intel® HD Graphics 4400
Witcher 3
  • Processor: Intel CPU Core i5-2500K 3.3GHz / AMD CPU Phenom II X4 940
  • Memory: 6 GB RAM
  • Graphics: Nvidia GPU GeForce GTX 660 / AMD GPU Radeon HD 7870
Actually, bump up all the memory requirements to 8 GBs, and those are some decent specs, relatively speaking. And keep in mind these are the minimum specs to even open the games. It’s almost as if the devs didn’t worry about console specs when making a PC version of the game, because this version of the game isn’t on console. Or maybe even that the consoles aren’t holding the games back that much because they’re not that weak. Just a hypothesis.
But I mean, the devs are still ooobviously having to take weak consoles into mind right? They could make their games sooo much more powerful if they were PC only, right? Right?
No. Not even close.
iRacing
  • CPU: Intel Core i3, i5, i7 or better or AMD Bulldozer or better
  • Memory: 8 GB RAM
  • GPU: NVidia GeForce 2xx series or better, 1GB+ dedicated video memory / AMD 5xxx series or better, 1GB+ dedicated video memory
Playerunknown’s Battlegrounds
  • CPU: Intel Core i3-4340 / AMD FX-6300
  • Memory: 6 GB RAM
  • GPU: nVidia GeForce GTX 660 2GB / AMD Radeon HD 7850 2GB
These are PC only games. That’s right, no consoles to hold them back, they don’t have to worry about whether an Xbox One could handle it. Yet, they don’t require anything more than the Multiplatform games.
Subnautica
  • CPU: Intel Haswell 2 cores / 4 threads @ 2.5Ghz or equivalent
  • Memory: 4GB
  • GPU: Intel HD 4600 or equivalent - This includes most GPUs scoring greater than 950pts in the 3DMark Fire Strike benchmark
Rust
  • CPU: 2 ghz
  • Memory: 8 GB RAM
  • DirectX: Version 11 (they don’t even list a GPU)
So what’s the deal? Theoretically, if developers don’t have to worry about console specs, then why aren’t they going all-out and making games that no console could even dream of supporting?
Low-end PCs.
What, did you think people only game on Steam if they spent at least $500 on gaming hardware? Not all PC gamers have gaming-PC specs, and if devs close their games out to players who don’t have the strongest of PCs, then they’d be losing out on a pretty sizable chunk of their potential buyers.
Saying “devs having to deal with consoles is holding gaming back” is like saying “racing teams having to deal with Ford is holding GT racing back.” A: racing teams don’t have to deal with Ford if they don’t want to, which is probably why many of them don’t, and B: even though Ford doesn’t make the fastest cars overall, they still manage to make cars that are awesome on their own, they don’t even need to be compared to anything else to know that they make good cars.
I want to go back to that previous point though, developers having to deal with low-end PCs, because it’s integral to the next point:

“PCs are more powerful, gaming on PC provides a better experience.”

This one isn’t so much of a misconception as it is… misleading.
Did you know that according to the Steam Hardware & Software Survey (July 2017) , the percentage of Steam gamers who use a GPU that's less powerful than that of a PS4 Slim’s GPU is well over 50%? Things get dismal when compared to the PS4 Pro (Or Xbox One X). On top of that, the percentage of PC gamers who own a Nvidia 10 series card is about 20% (about 15% for the 1060, 1080 and 1070 owners).
Now to be fair, the large majority of gamers have CPUs with considerably high clock speeds, which is the main factor in CPU gaming performance. But, the number of Steam gamers with as much RAM or more than a PS4 or Xbox One is less than 50%, which can really bottleneck what those CPUs can handle.
These numbers are hardly better than they were in 2013, all things considered. Sure, a PS3/360 weeps in the face of even a $400 PC, but in this day in age, consoles have definitely caught up.
Sure, we could mention the fact that even 1% of Steam accounts represents over 1 million accounts, but that doesn’t really matter compared to the 10s of millions of 8th gen consoles sold; looking at it that way, sure the number of Nvidia 10 series owners is over 20 million, but that ignores the fact that there are over 5 times more 8th gen consoles sold than that.
Basically, even though PCs run on a spectrum, saying they're more powerful “on average” is actually wrong. Sure, they have the potential for being more powerful, but most of the time, people aren’t willing to pay the premium to reach those extra bits of performance.
Now why is this important? What matters are the people who spent the premium cost for premium parts, right? Because of the previous point: PCs don’t have some ubiquitous quality over the consoles, developers will always have to keep low-end PCs in mind, because not even half of all PC players can afford the good stuff, and you have to look at the top quarter of Steam players before you get to PS4-Pro-level specs. If every Steam player were to get a PS4 Pro, it would be an upgrade for over 60% of them, and 70% of them would be getting an upgrade with the Xbox One X.
Sure, you could still make the argument that when you pay more for PC parts, you get a better experience than you could with a console. We can argue all day about budget PCs, but a console can’t match up to a $1,000 PC build. It’s the same as paying more for car parts, in the end you get a better car. However, there is a certain problem with that…

“You pay a little more for a PC, you get much more quality.”

The idea here is that the more you pay for PC parts, the performance increases at a faster rate than the price does. Problem: that’s not how technology works. Paying twice as much doesn’t get you twice the quality the majority of the time.
For example, let’s look at graphics cards, specifically the GeForce 10 series cards, starting with the GTX 1050.
  • 1.8 TFLOP
  • 1.35 GHz base clock
  • 2 GB VRAM
  • $110
This is our reference, our basis of comparison. Any percentages will be based on the 1050’s specs.
Now let’s look at the GTX 1050 Ti, the 1050’s older brother.
  • 2.1 TFLOP
  • 1.29 GHz base clock
  • 4 GB VRAM
  • $140 retail
This is pretty good. You only increase the price by about 27%, and you get an 11% increase in floating point speed and a 100% increase (double) in VRAM. Sure you get a slightly lower base clock, but the rest definitely makes up for it. In fact, according to GPU boss, the Ti managed 66 fps, or a 22% increase in frame rate for Battlefield 4, and a 54% increase in mHash/second in bitcoin mining. The cost increase is worth it, for the most part.
But let’s get to the real meat of it; what happens when we double our budget? Surely we should see a massive increase performance, I bet some of you are willing to bet that twice the cost means more than twice the performance.
The closest price comparison for double the cost is the GTX 1060 (3 GB), so let’s get a look at that.
  • 3.0 TFLOP
  • 1.5 GHz base clock
  • 3 GB VRAM
  • $200 retail
Well… not substantial, I’d say. About a 50% increase in floating point speed, an 11% increase in base clock speed, and a 1GB decrease in VRAM. For [almost] doubling the price, you don’t get much.
Well surely raw specs don’t tell the full story, right? Well, let’s look at some real wold comparisons. Once again, according to GPU Boss, there’s a 138% increase in hashes/second for bitcoin mining, and at 99 fps, an 83% frame rate increase in Battlefield 4. Well, then, raw specs does not tell the whole story!
Here’s another one, the 1060’s big brother… or, well, slightly-more-developed twin.
  • 3.9 TFLOP
  • 1.5 GHz base clock
  • 6 GB VRAM
  • $250 retail
Seems reasonable, another $50 for a decent jump in power and double the memory! But, as we’ve learned, we shouldn’t look at the specs for the full story.
I did do a GPU Boss comparison, but for the BF4 frame rate, I had to look at Tom’s Hardware (sorry miners, GPU boss didn’t cover the mHash/sec spec either). What’s the verdict? Well, pretty good, I’d say. With 97 FPS, a 79% increase over the 1050— wait. 97? That seems too low… I mean, the 3GB version got 99.
Well, let’s see what Tech Power Up has to say...
94.3 fps. 74% increase. Huh.
Alright alright, maybe that was just a dud. We can gloss over that I guess. Ok, one more, but let’s go for the big fish: the GTX 1080.
  • 9.0 TFLOP
  • 1.6 GHz base clock
  • 8 GB VRAM
  • $500 retail
That jump in floating point speed definitely has to be something, and 4 times the VRAM? Sure it’s 5 times the price, but as we saw, raw power doesn’t always tell the full story. GPU Boss returns to give us the run down, how do these cards compare in the real world?
Well… a 222% (over three-fold) increase in mHash speed, and a 218% increase in FPS for Battlefield 4. That’s right, for 5 times the cost, you get 3 times the performance. Truly, the raw specs don’t tell the full story.
You increase the cost by 27%, you increase frame rate in our example game by 22%. You increase the cost by 83%, you increase the frame rate by 83%. Sounds good, but if you increase the cost by 129%, and you get a 79% (-50% cost/power increase) increase in frame rate. You increase it by 358%, and you increase the frame rate by 218% (-140% cost/power increase). That’s not paying “more for much more power,” that’s a steep drop-off after the third cheapest option.
In fact, did you know that you have to get to the 1060 (6GB) before you could compare the GTX line to a PS4 Pro? Not to mention that at $250, the price of a 1060 (6GB) you could get an entire PS4 Slim bundle, or that you have to get to the 1070 before you beat the Xbox One X.
On another note, let’s look at a PS4 Slim…
  • 1.84 TFLOP
  • 800 MHz base clock
  • 8 GB VRAM
  • $300 retail
…Versus a PS4 Pro.
  • 4.2 TFLOP
  • 911 MHz base clock
  • 8 GB VRAM
  • $400 retail
128% increase in floating point speed, 13% increase in clock speed, for a 25% difference in cost. Unfortunately there is no Battlefield 4 comparison to make, but in BF1, the frame rate is doubled (30 fps to 60) and the textures are taken to 11. For what that looks like, I’ll leave it up to this bloke. Not to even mention that you can even get the texture buffs in 4K. Just like how you get a decent increase in performance based on price for the lower-cost GPUs, the same applies here.
It’s even worse when you look at the CPU for a gaming PC. The more money you spend, again, the less of a benefit you get per dollar. Hardware Unboxed covers this in a video comparing different levels of Intel CPUs. One thing to note is that the highest i7 option (6700K) in this video was almost always within 10 FPS (though for a few games, 15 FPS) of a certain CPU in that list for just about all of the games.
…That CPU was the lowest i3 (6100) option. The lowest i3 was $117 and the highest i7 was $339, a 189% price difference for what was, on average, a 30% or less difference in frame rate. Even the lowest Pentium option (G4400, $63) was often able to keep up with the i7.
The CPU and GPU are usually the most expensive and power-consuming parts of a build, which is why I focused on them (other than the fact that they’re the two most important parts of a gaming PC, outside of RAM). With both, this “pay more to get much more performance” idea is pretty much the inverse of the truth.

“The console giants are bad for game developers, Steam doesn't treat developers as bad as Microsoft or especially Sony.”

Now one thing you might’ve heard is that the PS3 was incredibly difficult for developers to make games for, which for some, fueled the idea that console hardware is difficult too develop on compared to PC… but this ignores a very basic idea that we’ve already touched on: if the devs don’t want to make the game compatible with a system, they don’t have to. In fact, this is why Left 4 Dead and other Valve games aren’t on PS3, because they didn’t want to work with it’s hardware, calling it “too complex.” This didn’t stop the game from selling well over 10 million units worldwide. If anything, this was a problem for the PS3, not the dev team.
This also ignores that games like LittleBigPlanet, Grand Theft Auto IV, and Metal Gear Solid 4 all came out in the same year as Left 4 Dead (2008) on PS3. Apparently, plenty of other dev teams didn’t have much of a problem with the PS3’s hardware, or at the very least, they got used to it soon enough.
On top of that, when developing the 8th gen consoles, both Sony and Microsoft sought to use CPUs that were easier for developers, which included making decisions that considered apps for the consoles’ usage for more than gaming. On top of that, using their single-chip proprietary CPUs is cheaper and more energy efficient than buying pre-made CPUs and boards, which is far better of a reason for using them than some conspiracy about Sony and MS trying to make devs' lives harder.
Now, console exclusives are apparently a point of contention: it’s often said that exclusive can cause developers to go bankrupt. However, exclusivity doesn’t have to be a bad thing for the developer. For example, when Media Molecule had to pitch their game to a publisher (Sony, coincidentally), they didn’t end up being tied into something detrimental to them.
Their initial funding lasted for 6 months. From then, Sony offered additional funding, in exchange for Console Exclusivity. This may sound concerning to some, but the game ended up going on to sell almost 6 million units worldwide and launched Media Molecule into the gaming limelight. Sony later bought the development studio, but 1: this was in 2010, two years after LittleBigPlanet’s release, and 2: Media Molecule seem pretty happy about it to this day. If anything, signing up with Sony was one of the best things they could’ve done, in their opinion.
Does this sound like a company that has it out for developers? There are plenty of examples that people will use to put Valve in a good light, but even Sony is comparatively good to developers.

“There are more PC gamers.”

The total number of active PC gamers on Steam has surpassed 120 million, which is impressive, especially considering that this number is double that of 2013’s figure (65 million). But the number of monthly active users on Xbox Live and PSN? About 120 million (1, 2) total. EDIT: You could argue that this isn't an apples-to-apples comparison, sure, so if you want to, say, compare the monthly number of Steam users to console? Steam has about half of what consoles do, at 67 million.
Now, back to the 65 million total user figure for Steam, the best I could find for reference for PlayStation's number was an article giving the number of registered PSN accounts in 2013, 150 million. In a similar 4-year period (2009 - 2013), the number of registered PSN accounts didn’t double, it sextupled, or increased by 6 fold. Considering how the PS4 is already at 2/3 of the number of sales the PS3 had, even though it’s currently 3 years younger than its predecessor, I’m sure this trend is at least generally consistent.
For example, let’s look at DOOM 2016, an awesome faced-paced shooting title with graphics galore… Of course, on a single platform, it sold best on PC/Steam. 2.36 million Steam sales, 2.05 million PS4 sales, 1.01 million Xbox One sales.
But keep in mind… when you add the consoles sales together, you get over 3 million sales on the 8th gen systems. Meaning: this game was best sold on console. In fact, the Steam sales have only recently surpassed the PS4 sales. By the way VG charts only shows sales for physical copies of the games, so the number of PS4 and Xbox sales, when digital sales are included, are even higher than 3 million.
This isn’t uncommon, by the way.
Even with the games were the PC sales are higher than either of the consoles, there generally are more console sales total. But, to be fair, this isn’t anything new. The number of PC gamers hasn’t dominated the market, the percentages have always been about this much. PC can end up being the largest single platform for games, but consoles usually sell more copies total.
EDIT: There were other examples but... Reddit has a 40,000-character limit.

"Modding is only on PC."

Xbox One is already working on it, and Bethesda is helping with that.
PS4 isn't far behind either. You could argue that these are what would be the beta stages of modding, but that just means modding on consoles will only grow.

What’s the Point?

This isn’t to say that there’s anything wrong with PC gaming, and this isn’t to exalt consoles. I’m not here to be the hipster defending the little guy, nor to be the one to try to put down someone/thing out of spite. This is about showing that PCs and consoles are overall pretty similar because there isn’t much dividing them, and that there isn’t anything wrong with being a console gamer. There isn’t some chasm separating consoles and PCs, at the end of the day they’re both computers that are (generally) designed for gaming. This about unity as gamers, to try to show that there shouldn’t be a massive divide just because of the computer system you game on. I want gamers to be in an environment where specs don't separate us; whether you got a $250 PS4 Slim or just built a $2,500 gaming PC, we’re here to game and should be able to have healthy interactions regardless of your platform.
I’m well aware that this isn’t going to fix… much, but this needs to be said: there isn’t a huge divide between the PC and consoles, they’re far more similar than people think. There are upsides and downsides that one has that the other doesn’t on both sides. There’s so much more I could touch on, like how you could use SSDs or 3.5 inch hard drives with both, or that even though PC part prices go down over time, so do consoles, but I just wanted to touch on the main points people try to use to needlessly separate the two kinds of systems (looking at you PCMR) and correct them, to get the point across.
I thank anyone who takes the time to read all of this, and especially anyone who doesn’t take what I say out of context. I also want to note that, again, this isn’tanti-PC gamer.” If it were up to me, everyone would be a hybrid gamer.
Cheers.
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Further, Karmacoin can be used by:
  • Companies wanting to provide redeemable rewards to staff
  • Companies wanting to provide redeemable rewards to customers
  • School systems wanting to provide redeemable rewards to students
  • Local governments wanting to provide rewards to their citizens
  • Websites wanting to entice visitors with incentives to visit, interact, or purchase
  • Retail shops wanting to provide incentives to customers to visit the store, browse, or shop
The possibilities in this new industry, which we call the "Good" economy, are endless. Karmacoin aims to be at the forefront of the Good economy by making these micropayments easy, fast, secure, and very, very cheap for everyone involved.
Karmacoin transaction fees are so small they barely register. Here's a comparison of fees:
Credit Card Check Wire Transfer Paypal Bitcoin KARMACOIN
Cost to send 10 cents >100% >100% >100% >100% >100% 0.00%
But the above list of ways in which Karmacoin can be used only scratches the surface of what is possible. As we move towards the Internet of things there will be ways to interact with all of its little components. Each of these components potentially represents a micro-transaction. Accessing, buying, and selling content, services, and other information and a whole world of things that we are unable to think of now.
Billions of transactions performed by hundreds of millions of people each and every day. Many of these transactions fall within the domain of Karmacoin, and that is where we will take the lead in the Good economy.
That is our vision. We hope you'll join us by using, sharing, and giving Karmacoin.
Developers
Please take a look at our development and promotional bounties. We appreciate all you can do to advance Karmacoin and bring it to the next level. We all here believe in Karmacoin and hope you will too. Please help us on our journey. We promise it will be an exciting one!
Thank you to the entire Karmacoin community for being so wonderful and spreading good karma. This will be an exciting journey for us!
submitted by kosmost to Karmacoin [link] [comments]

The Concept of Bitcoin

The Concept of Bitcoin
https://preview.redd.it/5r9soz2ltq421.jpg?width=268&format=pjpg&auto=webp&s=6a89685f735b53ec1573eefe08c8646970de8124
What is Bitcoin?
Bitcoin is an experimental system of transfer and verification of property based on a network of peer to peer without any central authority.
The initial application and the main innovation of the Bitcoin network is a system of digital currency decentralized unit of account is bitcoin.
Bitcoin works with software and a protocol that allows participants to issue bitcoins and manage transactions in a collective and automatic way. As a free Protocol (open source), it also allows interoperability of software and services that use it. As a currency bitcoin is both a medium of payment and a store of value.
Bitcoin is designed to self-regulate. The limited inflation of the Bitcoin system is distributed homogeneously by computing the network power, and will be limited to 21 million divisible units up to the eighth decimal place. The functioning of the Exchange is secured by a general organization that everyone can examine, because everything is public: the basic protocols, cryptographic algorithms, programs making them operational, the data of accounts and discussions of the developers.
The possession of bitcoins is materialized by a sequence of numbers and letters that make up a virtual key allowing the expenditure of bitcoins associated with him on the registry. A person may hold several key compiled in a 'Bitcoin Wallet ', 'Keychain' web, software or hardware which allows access to the network in order to make transactions. Key to check the balance in bitcoins and public keys to receive payments. It contains also (often encrypted way) the private key associated with the public key. These private keys must remain secret, because their owner can spend bitcoins associated with them on the register. All support (keyrings) agrees to maintain the sequence of symbols constituting your keychain: paper, USB, memory stick, etc. With appropriate software, you can manage your assets on your computer or your phone.
Bitcoin on an account, to either a holder of bitcoins in has given you, for example in Exchange for property, either go through an Exchange platform that converts conventional currencies in bitcoins, is earned by participating in the operations of collective control of the currency.
The sources of Bitcoin codes have been released under an open source license MIT which allows to use, copy, modify, merge, publish, distribute, sublicense, and/or sell copies of the software, subject to insert a copyright notice into all copies.
Bitcoin creator, Satoshi Nakamoto
What is the Mining of bitcoin?
Technical details :
During mining, your computer performs cryptographic hashes (two successive SHA256) on what is called a header block. For each new hash, mining software uses a different random number that called Nuncio. According to the content of the block and the nonce value typically used to express the current target. This number is called the difficulty of mining. The difficulty of mining is calculated by comparing how much it is difficult to generate a block compared to the first created block. This means that a difficulty of 70000 is 70000 times more effort that it took to Satoshi Nakamoto to generate the first block. Where mining was much slower and poorly optimized.
The difficulty changes each 2016 blocks. The network tries to assign the difficulty in such a way that global computing power takes exactly 14 days to generate 2016 blocks. That's why the difficulty increases along with the power of the network.
Material :
In the beginning, mining with a processor (CPU) was the only way to undermine bitcoins. (GPU) graphics cards have possibly replaced the CPU due to their nature, which allowed an increase between 50 x to 100 x in computing power by using less electricity by megahash compared to a CPU.
Although any modern GPU can be used to make the mining, the brand AMD GPU architecture has proved to be far superior to nVidia to undermine bitcoins and the ATI Radeon HD 5870 card was the most economical for a time.
For a more complete list of graphics cards and their performance, see Wiki Bitcoin: comparison of mining equipment
In the same way that transition CPU to GPU, the world of mining has evolved into the use of the Field Programmable Gate Arrays (FPGA) as a mining platform. Although FPGAs did not offer an increase of 50 x to 100 x speed of calculation as the transition from CPU to GPU, they offered a better energy efficiency.
A typical HD/s 600 graphics card consumes about 400w of power, while a typical FPGA device can offer a rate of hash of 826 MH/s to 80w of power consumption, a gain of 5 x more calculations for the same energy power. Since energy efficiency is a key factor in the profitability of mining, it was an important step for the GPU to FPGA migration for many people.
The world of the mining of bitcoin is now migrating to the Application Specific Integrated Circuit (ASIC). An ASIC is a chip designed specifically to accomplish a single task. Unlike FPGAs, an ASIC is unable to be reprogrammed for other tasks. An ASIC designed to undermine bitcoins cannot and will not do anything else than to undermine bitcoins.
The stiffness of an ASIC allows us to offer an increase of 100 x computing power while reducing power consumption compared to all other technologies. For example, a classic device to offer 60 GH/s (1 hashes equals 1000 Megahash. 1GH/s = 1000 Mh/s) while consuming 60w of electricity. Compared to the GPU, it is an increase in computing power of 100 x and a reduction of power consumption by a factor of 7.
Unlike the generations of technologies that have preceded the ASIC, ASIC is the "end of the line" when we talk about important technology change. The CPUs have been replaced by the GPUs, themselves replaced by FPGAs that were replaced by ASICs.
There is nothing that can replace the ASICs now or in the immediate future. There will be technological refinements in ASIC products, and improvements in energy efficiency, but nothing that may match increased from 50 x to 100 x the computing power or a 7 x reduction in power consumption compared with the previous technology.
Which means that the energy efficiency of an ASIC device is the only important factor of all product ASIC, since the estimated lifetime of an ASIC device is superior to the entire history of the mining of bitcoin. It is conceivable that a purchased ASIC device today is still in operation in two years if the unit still offers a profitable enough economic to keep power consumption. The profitability of mining is also determined by the value of bitcoin but in all cases, more a device has a good energy efficiency, it is profitable.
Software :
There are two ways to make mining: by yourself or as part of a team (a pool). If you are mining for yourself, you must install the Bitcoin software and configure it to JSON-RPC (see: run Bitcoin). The other option is to join a pool. There are multiple available pools. With a pool, the profit generated by any block generated by a member of the team is split between all members of the team. The advantage of joining a team is to increase the frequency and stability of earnings (this is called reduce the variance) but gains will be lower. In the end, you will earn the same amount with the two approaches. Undermine solo allows you to receive earnings huge but very infrequent, while miner with a pool can offer you small stable and steady gains.
Once you have your software configured or that you have joined a pool, the next step is to configure the mining software. The software the most populare for ASIC/FPGA/GPU currently is CGminer or a derivative designed specifically for FPGAS and ASICs, BFGMiner.
If you want a quick overview of mining without install any software, try Bitcoin Plus, a Bitcoin minor running in your browser with your CPU. It is not profitable to make serious mining, but it is a good demonstration of the principle of the mining team.
submitted by Josephbitcoin to u/Josephbitcoin [link] [comments]

Low wattage hobby miner hardware?

I'm a fan of bitcoin and like to support the bitcoin by buying and holding BTC and operating a full node - a bitnodes unit that consumes a very minimal 2.5 Watts.
Just for fun I'd like to run a small miner drawing about say 20-50 Watts tops, I know this will not be profitable in any way but would like to do it anyway more as part of a hobby than anything.
I've mined litecoin in the past using a bank of 3 graphics cards drawing about 750W total and it was a bit impractical for me to be honest due to the noise and heat they generated and the uncompetitive price I pay for residential electricity.
I figure something that only requires minimal cooling and therefore has no heat and noise issues would be ideal. Maybe a USB miner plugged into a raspberry Pi? (since I already run a couple of Pis).
It would be nice to have something fairly competitive in terms of hashes/joule efficiency. I see the ant miner S7 currently leads by a wide margin with about 4000 MHashes/Joule. See Mining hardware comparison
submitted by locster to btc [link] [comments]

4 Bitcoin-Newbies: What I have learned about BTC in 4 months

Hi guys,
I was introduced to Bitcoins last September. I didn't know anything about that and I started studying more about that.
I also found this forum and learned A LOT from you guys, so, to thank you all and to give back, I thought about doing a small summary of what I have learned so maybe new guys can find this helpful.
I will post a lot of links from outside and to my own posts, so people with the same doubts that I had can look for the answers that I got there and maybe that may answer their question too.
I learned: In September 2012, the very first thing I learned was from this video (like many of us) :
http://youtu.be/Um63OQz3bjo and this website: http://www.weusecoins.com
My friend introduced me to my first wallet and my first pool: http://bitcoin.org/ and http://bitminter.com/
I still didn't know what I was doing.
This amazing post resolve 99% of your doubts: https://bitcointalk.org/index.php?topic=9430.0
At the end September I found out that mining as we know it (or as I just knew) was about to end thanks to the ASIC machines. I didn't know what mining was and less idea of what ASIC was. So I started reading about that and I find many companies like Butterfly Labs, Avalon and BTCFPGA (http://bitcoinmagazine.com/tag/asic/)
I learned how awesome this forum is, willing to help a new guy like me
I was still learning how to mine, so I asked in this forum about that (https://bitcointalk.org/index.php?topic=114723.msg1236829#msg1236829) and they told me about pools, mining and I ended upgrading my graphic card (you can compare the speed of mining here: https://en.bitcoin.it/wiki/Mining_hardware_comparison and you can calculate how many bitcoins here: http://tpbitcalc.appspot.com/)
I found out all the pools out there (https://bitcointalk.org/index.php?topic=104664.0)
In October I was looking for rigs to mine (https://bitcointalk.org/index.php?topic=114823.msg1238027#msg1238027) because I found this video: http://youtu.be/eLt8Se3vVNg
Then I didn't understand why pay fees when mining, but this forum was even greater than what I thought https://bitcointalk.org/index.php?topic=115260.msg1242456#msg1242456
So once I learned about mining, I download GUIminer and I started mining in 3 pools at the same time (https://bitcointalk.org/?topic=3878.0)
After 40 days I mined my first bitcoin YAY! now, I wanted to know what I can do with that and I found places to buy with bitcoins like www.bitmit.net
I wanted to control my mining from my cellphone and I found Bitcare very useful (https://play.google.com/store/apps/details?id=org.cryptcoins.btcare&hl=en), and also Bitcoin Wallet to have a new wallet in your phone (https://play.google.com/store/apps/details?id=de.schildbach.wallet&feature=search_result#?t=W251bGwsMSwyLDEsImRlLnNjaGlsZGJhY2gud2FsbGV0Il0).
I wanted to buy more bitcoins, didn't know where. Dwolla https://www.dwolla.com/ and Mt.Gox https://mtgox.com/ were there for me. I found out that Dwolla is a pain in the ass. I had to wait 3 weeks to verify me and 3-5 days every time to make a deposit. But besides that, it works...althought I found this today: http://codinginmysleep.com/dwolla-begins-suspensions/
People who likes bitcoins don't usually likes PayPal
I also found places where they give bitcoins away...for free! http://makebitcoinsfast.com/ and http://earnbitcoin.wikidot.com/
I was new and happy until I found what a block is and how it dropped from 50BTC to 25BTC https://en.bitcoin.it/wiki/Blocks and http://blockchain.info/
You can know when the new block will happen: http://bitcoinclock.com/
More companies started to use bitcoins like WordPress (http://www.forbes.com/sites/jonmatonis/2012/11/16/whats-your-bitcoin-strategy-wordpress-now-accepts-bitcoin-across-the-planet/). You can even buy a house with btc! http://bitcoinmagazine.com/where-to-spend-your-bitcoins/
Cool sites that I still don't understand like: http://cognitivemining.com/ or http://bitcoinstatus.rowit.co.uk/
The biggest wallet so far had more than 613,000 BTC and its own site (http://1dkybekt5s2gdtv7aqw6rqepavnsryhoym.com/)
You can watch how bitcoins are going higher or lower in sites like here: http://bitcoinwatch.com/ and http://bitcoin.clarkmoody.com/
That a guru of Gold and Silver, is accepting Bitcoins in his web: http://mogamboguru.blogspot.com/
They have more names than just bitcoins... Sub-units of a bitcoin such asmillibitcoins ("Millies") or microbitcoins ("Mikes"). The Bitcoin protocol uses a base unit of one hundred-millionth of a Bitcoin ("a Satoshi")
What 2013 has in store for bitcoins: http://bitcoinmagazine.com/the-next-year-in-bitcoin-what-2013-has-in-store/
Some companies are afraid of bitcoins like apple and why: www.forbes.com/sites/jonmatonis/2012/06/13/why-apple-is-afraid-of-bitcoin/
You can help others by crowd founding with btcs: https://bitcointalk.org/index.php?topic=118458.0
You can bet anything: http://betsofbitco.in/ or http://bitbet.us/
And also short cut your wallet: http://payb.tc/
Hitler sells alls bitcoins: http://youtu.be/alc0gG0u48M
That if the bitcoin drops to $4 (it was my dream )... 82% of the people would buy all the btc they could https://bitcointalk.org/index.php?topic=137249.0
Casinos will make money....ALWAYS, any currency, any country: www.forbes.com/sites/jonmatonis/2013/01/22/bitcoin-casinos-release-2012-earnings/
There is wikipedia about bitcoins (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bitcoin) and there is a wikipedia only of bitcoins: (https://en.bitcoin.it/wiki/Main_Page)
Blogs keep growing to understand better about bitcoins: http://www.thebitcointrader.com/
I learned the hard way that if you have several wallets in your Bitcoin Wallet in your phone, it can crash and lose money. Be careful. https://bitcointalk.org/index.php?topic=137785.msg1468748#msg1468748
You can have multiples wallets in your computer thanks to: https://multibit.org/
I thought a fork was for eating, but there are more https://bitcointalk.org/index.php?topic=136802.msg1457287#msg1457287
There is no flaws in bitcoins: https://bitcointalk.org/index.php?topic=136740.msg1456910#msg1456910
Also, if you sign your account of the forum with your wallet, your nickname would be attached to it, always: https://bitcointalk.org/index.php?topic=137667.msg1467500#msg1467500
You must create a SECURE wallet: https://bitcointalk.org/index.php?topic=17240.0
And that's it so far. I'm still learning but I can see how much I have learned in just 4 months. I got my wallets secured, with many bitcoins and waiting for an asic.
I hope this post can help anybody.
Thank you guys!
All the best.
Source:https://bitcointalk.org/index.php?topic=138890.0
submitted by saidee to Bitcoin [link] [comments]

Step Inside... We are giving away 200,000,000 Karmacoin to EVERYONE to celebrate our new websites launching later today

(We're giving away 200,000,000 Karmacoin over the next few days to everyone. See the "How Do I Get Karmacoin?" section below.)
What is Karmacoin?
Karmacoin is a new way to show your family, friends, and others that you appreciate them. Think of it as a "Like" button that you can take anywhere. It's a P2P currency, like Bitcoin. You can use it to share with those you care about. We call it Give+Karma, because when you do good, good comes back to you.
You can think of Karmacoin as another way to say thanks. When you Give+Karma you're sharing your experience in a community where the little things matter. Random acts of kindness, caring about what others have to say, showing appreciation, being happy, doing good things, and enjoying life. It's the little things that count. And that's why we developed Karmacoin.
We're currently expanding our cause not just around the internet but around the world. We shared a summary of our business plan and project schedule with our community so that everyone knows what we're up to. Our goal is to become the #1 way for people to reward others, and be rewarded themselves. Karmacoin can be thought of as an incentive for more people to:
Our vision is a world where hundreds of millions of people around the world use Karmacoin everyday.
How Do I Get Karmacoin?
You can get Karmacoin from others who share it, or purchasing it from a trusted exchange like MintPal using your Bitcoin. In a few days we'll be announcing an easy way to buy Karmacoin using Paypal.
Luckily, to celebrate our new main website and a new place where you can share stories about people doing good things called Karmashare, both launching on March 20, we are giving away 200,000,000 Karmacoin so you can try it out!
**Be sure to subscribe to the Karmacoin subreddit **
Be sure to download the Wallet for Windows, Mac, or Linux. (We're updating the graphics so don't be alarmed! It's the correct version.) Once you've installed this, you can click on the Receive tab, highlight the first row, and click the Copy button at the bottom. This is your new Karmacoin address ("Karmaddress") you can use to receive Karmacoin. (You can also send by clicking on the Send tab and entering the recipient's Karmaddress.) We're working on an easy-to-understand video tutorial now, and will be posting that for the community.
If someone is sending you Karma you can give them your new Karmaddress and you should receive it anywhere from 15 seconds to a few minutes.
Our website will soon offer some instructions of how to get and use Karmacoin. Stay tuned...
The Karmacoin Vision
We believe that the micro-transaction economy is based on kindness, sharing, small donations, microloans, tipping, and the little things that can make life wonderful and people feel appreciated, including:
  • Online tips to other internet users who deserve a little recognition
  • Tipping helpful service people offline and online
  • Paying for your co-workers cup of coffee in the morning
  • Kids receiving small amounts of money, or even allowance
  • Being able to trade a few hours of your professional time for Karmacoin that are then donated to your favorite cause on KarmaTrade.me (coming soon)
  • Independent artists being paid more money by receiving more payments from more people
  • Paying 30% less for a song because Karmacoin makes transaction fees nearly non-existent.
  • Lending a stranger $10 worth of Karma, knowing that he's got a good reputation with others at the future Karmacoin microloan site, KarmaPay.me
  • Helping someone out with bus fare to get to their first job interview at Karmashare.me or sharing a story about how someone helped you when you needed it most
  • Being able to easily accept small payments from friends, family, co-workers, or customers
This is an untapped industry because traditional payment methods such as credit cards, bank transfers, and checks (even PayPal) make small transactions too expensive from transaction fees, or too slow to be of practical use. For example, if you wish to give 25 cents to someone in person, it's easy. But try doing it online. It becomes prohibitively expensive to the point where you'd need to send 50 cents or more just so the other person can get 25.
Further, Karmacoin can be used by:
  • Companies wanting to provide redeemable rewards to staff
  • Companies wanting to provide redeemable rewards to customers
  • School systems wanting to provide redeemable rewards to students
  • Local governments wanting to provide rewards to their citizens
  • Websites wanting to entice visitors with incentives to visit, interact, or purchase
  • Retail shops wanting to provide incentives to customers to visit the store, browse, or shop
The possibilities in this new industry, which we call the "Good" economy, are endless. Karmacoin aims to be at the forefront of the Good economy by making these micropayments easy, fast, secure, and very, very cheap for everyone involved.
Karmacoin transaction fees are so small they barely register. Here's a comparison of fees:
Credit Card Check Wire Transfer Paypal Bitcoin KARMACOIN
Cost to send 10 cents >100% >100% >100% >100% >100% 0.00%
But the above list of ways in which Karmacoin can be used only scratches the surface of what is possible. As we move towards the Internet of things there will be ways to interact with all of its little components. Each of these components potentially represents a micro-transaction. Accessing, buying, and selling content, services, and other information and a whole world of things that we are unable to think of now.
Billions of transactions performed by hundreds of millions of people each and every day. Many of these transactions fall within the domain of Karmacoin, and that is where we will take the lead in the Good economy.
That is our vision. We hope you'll join us by using, sharing, and giving Karmacoin.
Developers
Please take a look at our development and promotional bounties. We appreciate all you can do to advance Karmacoin and bring it to the next level. We all here believe in Karmacoin and hope you will too. Please help us on our journey. We promise it will be an exciting one!
Thank you to the entire Karmacoin community for being so wonderful and spreading good karma. This will be an exciting journey for us!
[note: xpost from karmacoin subreddit to all the wonderful folks on Cryptocurrency)
submitted by kosmost to CryptoCurrency [link] [comments]

how do i even begin?

EDIT: Thank you for your help guys.
ok i answered some of my own questions and by using this: http://tpbitcalc.appspot.com/?difficulty=50810339.0483&hashrate=0.39&exchangerate=115.94&bitcoinsperblock=25.00&rigcost=1500.00&powerconsumption=80.00&powercost=0.059&investmentperiod=365 in 1 year i would create ~1/1000 of a bitcoin and it would cost me about 50 dollars... i guess it isn't worth it
now that i know i can't make them... where can i buy them? whats the best way to save them and how can i protect them?
so i've done a fair bit of looking around trying to comprehend what exactly i have to do to start mining, but for the life of me I cannot rap my head around it.
some links i have been using:
http://www.reddit.com/Bitcoin/comments/18kt6y/psa_to_new_users_due_to_reddit_gold_announcement/
ok so how it works sorta makes sense.
https://en.bitcoin.it/wiki/FAQ#How_can_I_get_bitcoins.3F
read through this wiki page and still have a fair idea of what is kind of going on?
https://en.bitcoin.it/wiki/Comparison_of_mining_pools
now i want to start mining and think i'm in the right place to choose a mining pool to become a part of but after reviewing the descriptions for reward types im starting to get really confused. the way i see it prop is the best if you have a rather large mining node. but generally speaking for a single graphics card desktop computer you would want to go with PPLNS? im not sure.
then there is the whole question of something like this: http://bitcoinmining.co/
it says to point my "miner" to http://bitcoinmining.co:9332 but where and how to i setup a miner? i got bitcoinQT and ran it, it still hasn't finished updating the block history (very slow) but i feel like something is not right? it isn't just some app that you run is it?
I guess what im looking for is just like a quick 1,2,3 to sort of get me in order here.
  1. where can i find info on setting up a mining operation? is that even what i should be doing?
  2. what is the difference between BTC and other bitcoin exchanges using their own variant (eg. LTC http://bitcoinmining.co/?q=node/12)? should i even use something like that or should i be looking to make raw BTC with my own setup?
  3. can i run multiple bitcoin clients from the same machine and it will allow me to contribute to multiple pools at the same time or should i be focusing my processing power into one pool?
  4. I sort of understand that there is a physical file that i need to "store" in order for my BTC to be "alive"? is that right? or does some other entity record the BTC that i have "created"? really confusing...
any help would be greatly appreciated. as far as i could find i couldn't find a rubric for this sort of thing and i can't seem to find a "how to" that actually tells you HOW to do anything other then look for information. which when i look i dont quite understand what it is i am exactly doing. very disconcerting.
im either being stupid or i am approaching this in the wrong way. i can't seem to figure out which.
submitted by gigglepuffkidd to Bitcoin [link] [comments]

The monster mining machines of 2014

Good Day! Now I am fairly new to bitcoin mining, I've just discovered that my graphics card isn't mining more than 0,00 something something, basically it's not going to pay much off.
So I started looking into the new monster hardware coming in the near future, 2014.
https://en.bitcoin.it/wiki/Mining_hardware_comparison
Obviously there are many choices of hardware that will pay off ridicolously much more than that old nvidia or AMD card which is stuck in the average joes computer.
Of course the investment itself does cost, but considering the current bitcoin price of 710$, there is a high probability of making big bucks.
As for the mining rigs coming in 2014 it says some are coming in Q1 and some are coming in Q2, the first and second quarter. And one of the questions an investor might have would be, which one is the best to preorder based on delivery.
For example, the butterfly monarch
http://www.butterflylabs.com/monarch/
Which it says comes out January / February
or the Synapse Terra-1
http://axonlabs.net/?l=
which says "Production / Shipping will start in Q1/Q2 2014. Since units are purchased faster than they can be produced"
My question is with all these options, which one to buy if you want it delivered as fast as possible.
And which one is the best choice.
submitted by Bvnney to Bitcoin [link] [comments]

CUDAMiner Optimization Basics

I've posted this information a lot recently to new miners with NVIDIA cards. This subreddit seemed like the right home for it, and hopefully this is will serve as a helpful starting place to clarify the very basics and get people started.
As always, watch your GPU core temperatures closely. Lower hash rates correlate to lower operating temperatures. Play with these features to adjust your hash rate according to the load your GPU can handle. For example, one of my cards has better cooling than the other, so I run them at different hash rates to keep them both in the temperature range that I'm comfortable with.
Getting Started (Windows Environment):
  1. Download and install the latest NVIDIA Drivers.
  2. Download and extract the latest version of cudaMiner (SEE BITCOINTALK - CUDAMINER LINK BELOW) .
  3. Create a new text file in the same directory as cudaminer.exe (x32 or x64, depending on your system).
  4. Open text file and enter your configuration into the new batch file (See below for samples. Change settings to match your specific set-up):
  5. Change text file extension to .bat
  6. Execute batch file (not the executable).
  7. ???
  8. To exit, CTRL+C to break, wait, then Y to exit OR press the "Red X"; If the the command window closes immediately, add "pause" to the end of the batch script to view the error.
  9. If running x64 version, try x32 version and compare results.
  10. !!!
  11. Profit
Common Errors
Error Possible Cause
Command prompt window flashes and closes. Usually indicates bad syntax or attempting to launch executable. Review batch script settings. Add "pause" to end of batch script to view error.
Stratum Authentication Failed / "HTTP Request failed; No Error" Indicates connection issue. Review server address & user credentials.
Memory error / Result doesn't validate on CPU / Error 30 (Indicates launch configuration is invalid/not optimal. Change launch configuration flags. Update drivers.
"json_rpc_call failed" You are launching the executable; you cannot do this. Create and launch using batch script instead.
:::Sample Configurations (EDIT TO MATCH YOUR SPECIFIC CREDENTIALS & GPU SETTINGS) :::Single GPU ::SingleGPU.bat cudaminer.exe -i 1 -C 1 -m 1 -H 1 -l auto -o stratum+tcp://YOUR.POOL.ADDRESS:#### -O USER.WORKER:WORKERPW :::Multi GPU, Multi Command Prompt ::GPU0.bat (Address/Login for Standard Pool Mining, 1st GPU) cudaminer.exe -d 0 -i 1 -C 1 -m 1 -H 1 -l auto -o stratum+tcp://YOUR.POOL.ADDRESS:#### -O USER.WORKER:WORKERPW ::GPU1.bat (Address/Login for P2Pool Mining, 2nd GPU) cudaminer.exe -d 1 -i 1 -C 1 -m 1 -H 1 -l K4x32 -o stratum+http://YOUR.P2POOL.ADDRESS:#### -O WALLETADDRESS:ANYPW :::Multi GPU, Single Command Prompt ::DoubleGPU.bat cudaminer.exe -d 0,1 -H 1,1 -i 1,1 -l K3x9,K4x32 -C 1,1 -o stratum+tcp://YOUR.POOL.ADDRESS:#### -O USER.WORKER:WORKERPW 
Fundamental Flags:
  • FLAGS ARE CASE SENSITIVE
Setting -flag (Options) Description
cudaminer.exe N/A Call to execute cudaMiner
Specify Device -d (Any, counts from 0) Only for multi-GPU configurations: create multiple .bat files or use comma separated values.
Interactive Mode -i (0/1) When enabled, it reduces GPU utilization and hash rate to allow for computer use during mining
Enable Texture Cache -C (0/1/2) (Disabled, 1-D Caching, 2-D Caching) may increase or reduce hash rate, available according to your compute capability - check WIKI CUDA LINK BELOW
Memory Batching -m (0/1) Consolidates hash work into a single memory block and can lead to lower memory usage. Is implicitly enabled with Texture Caching.
Hash Parallel -H (0/1/2) (CPU Only, CPU Assist, GPU Only) determines how much work will be shared by the CPU. Defaults to GPU Only (2) if not specified.
Launch Configuration^ -l (auto/G/GBxW) Autotune, autotune for card generation, or specify particular setting. Defaults to autotune if not specified.
Server URL -o Address:Port Full URL of the mining server you wish to connect to.
Device Credentials -O User:Pass Username (or Username.Workername for pools) & password pair for the mining server for your device.
Debug-Benchmark Mode& -D --benchmark Verbose output to view block/warp chart and test a configuration.
  • NOTE ^ : This option is they key to tuning your hash rate and resulting GPU temperature. Choosing "auto" will enable autotuning, allowing cudaMiner to choose the best config. Choosing just "G," card generation code, will autotune for that specific card generation. "GBxW" is the specific setting you choose for the card where "BLOCK" is the row #, "WARP" is the Column number in autotune chart. Your BLOCKxWARP value should not exceed your maximum core configuration (WIKI GPU LIST BELOW), otherwise cudaMiner will crash/return error. For best results, the BLOCKxWARP value should be an exact multiple of your core config.
-For example NVIDIA GT 750M, Kepler card, row 4, column 32 is K4x32 (4x32=128). This is exactly 1/3 of and does not exceed the max core config of 384). 
  • NOTE & : Autotuning reported hashrates are not always accurate, but you can use the results in the benchmark table to choose the ballpark hash rate you desire. If you define a setting or allow it to complete the autotuning, it will then begin the benchmark and show you the average hashrate once you end the sesion (CTRL+C). Before closing the command prompt, you can scroll back up and save a screenshot of the block table. Type "Y" after ending to close the program. Remember to turn OFF the flag -D --benchmark after you are done. This is benchmark mode; cudaMiner will not connect to the pool until you remove this flag
Sources & Additional References:
BitcoinTalk - cudaMiner Downloads & Latest News
Netcode Pool - cudaMiner Guide
/dogemining - NVIDIA Tuning Guide
Hardware Specifications/Comparisons
Wikipedia - Comparison of NVIDIA GPUs
Wikipedia - CUDA
cudaMiner Devs - cudaMiner scrypt Hashrate list
Litecoin WIKI - Hardware Comparison List
Litecoin WIKI - Hardware Comparison List (Raw Data)
Last Updated Mar 1, 2014
NyanCoins: KKvQjafJ3QckoCNQtdLkDfieBqUpuAVM4y
DogeCoins: DD4TcmjNE9RhVBaSadZDkqZtTQfyUstsFL
Or tips! Contributions greatly appreciated!
submitted by FwuffyKittens to nyanmining [link] [comments]

[modpost] Possible wiki page, something I call "All about miners," covering things from basic terminology to miner config files and overclocking.

What is a miner?
A miner is a computer set up to solve cryptographic hashes in the litecoin network. Once a clump of these hashes, or a block, is mined, litecoins pop out! It's like opening a box of chocolates, except you know what you're gonna get :) Miners also handle transaction confirmations, making sure no single coin is double-spent.
Setting up your computer to be a miner
What kind of computer do I need?
Optimally, you'd have a good power supply and a couple decent Radeon/ATI/AMD graphics cards. Because of litecoin's hash algorithm, the gap between mining with graphics cards and processors is less than with most other cryptocurrencies, meaning that mining with some desktop processors may be worth it after electricity costs. Note that mining with laptops is not recommended because of the heat generated by mining, and mining with NVIDIA graphics cards may not be worth the cost.
How do I know if litecoin mining will be profitable for me?
First, check how fast you'll be mining with your hardware, how many litecoins you'll mine in a day, and how much litecoins are worth. Now, multiply the number of litecoins per day by their worth. Then, find out the power draw of your hardware, and calculate energy cost. Then finish by subtract energy cost from your daily earnings. If your number is positive, you're making that much money per day. If negative, you're losing money.
Keep in mind that the worth of litecoins goes up/down, and you have to earn the cost of your hardware before you churn a profit. Mining difficulty also goes up/down, depending on how many people are mining how fast in relation to how many litecoins are supposed to be generated how fast. See the economics(coming soon) post for more info.
Okay, I did all that. How do I start?
All you have to do is download a program and change some settings (later in the guide), and you're ready to go. If you're comfortable with configurations and the command line, Reaper and cgminer are your best friends. Otherwise, GUIMiner-scrypt is right for you. If you want to mine on your processor, download the "batteries included" miner via this link and setup should be relatively self-explanatory.
Do I mine alone?
Due to the difficulty of mining, we recommend that you mine with a pool where multiple people mine together. Visit your pool's about or help page for proper miner settings, which we're about to get to in-depth!
Under the hood
Configuring your miner (aka the hard part)
Before we get started, you should become familiar with these terms:
None of those will have any affect on how fast you mine. The settings that we'll be focusing on are:
If you're using GUIMiner-scrypt, there are default settings for different cards (lower right dropdown). I'm mining on a 7870. Here is what it looks like for me. You can follow along with the rest of this guide to optimize your settings. GUIMiner-scrypt is just a GUI to cgminer and reaper anyways.
If you are using a command-line miner, like reaper and cgminer, I recommend you download and isntall Notepad++ or SublimeText if on Linux.
Reaper is currently considered to be the best tool for mining. After you unzip your downloaded file, in the folder you'll find reaper.conf. It should look something like this:
kernel reaper.cl save_binaries yes enable_graceful_shutdown no long_polling yes platform 0 device 0 #mine bitcoin mine litecoin #mine solidcoin 
This will make it mine litecoin on your first graphics card and reference litecoin.conf, which for me looks like
host us-pool.give-me-ltc.com port 8080 user poolusername.1 pass anything protocol litecoin worksize 256 vectors 1 aggression 18 threads_per_gpu 1 sharethreads 32 lookup_gap 2 gpu_thread_concurrency 15380 
As you see, my thread concurrency is slightly different from the default of GUIMiner-scrypt. I found that this concurrency gives me the best hashrate!
NOTE: I do not use cgminer to mine litecoin. If you plan on using cgminer, which offers more hardware-controlling settings, in the cgminer folder you will want to create a text file. Then, open that text file w/ Notepad++ or SublimeText, then Save As > cgminer.con > file type > all. This will save the file with the proper name and as the proper type. Note that cgminer does not support high concurrencies. For me, cgminer.conf would look something like:
{ "pools" : [ { "url" : "XXX", "user" : "XXX", "pass" : "XXX" } ], "auto-fan" : true, "gpu-engine" : "920", "gpu-fan" : "0-100", "gpu-memclock" : "1375", "gpu-powertune" : "20", "gpu-vddc" : "1.219", "temp-cutoff" : "85", "temp-overheat" : "80", "temp-target" : "75", "temp-hysteresis" : "3", "kernel" : "scrypt", "gputhreads" : "1", "thread_concurrency": "8192", "worksize": "256", "intensity" : "dynamic", "vectors" : "1" } 
You saw some settings similar to what we saw in Reaper's litecoin.conf. The other settings have to do with my card's clocks, voltage, and fan. This is covered in the overclocking section right below!
Overclocking (aka the risky part)
Okay, first off I'm not responsible if you cause damage to your parts. Please research safe overclock settings for your card. Second, don't be afraid. Modern hardware has many safety features in place that help prevent mayhem like me...lol jk this isn't a car insurance add. For your better understanding, become familiar with these terms:
No one setting controls how effectively you mine; what matters most when it comes to clocks is the ratio between your core/memory clocks. Generally, a ratio of 0.7 or below is best. You will need to experiment. If you're using cgminer, you can control card settings from the conf file. However, if you aren't, I recommend using MSI Afterburner as your overclocking tool. You will need to unlock some settings. Using my cgminer settings, MSI Afterburner looks like this. I have found these settings to be the most stable while bringing me a high hashrate.
Other people's optimum settings
You can check the sidebar for the hardware comparison chart, but it is rarely updated and has huge sways in results. It is a good starting place. The mods of this subreddit will be putting together an updated, more accurate list in the near future.
END
I hope all things go smoothly for you and that you've learned a lot! Please consider donating LTC to
My wallet: LiD41gjLjT5JL2hfVz8X4SRm27T3wQqzjk
The writer of the [Consolidated Litecoin Mining Guide] which helped get me started
The writer of the [Absolute Beginner's Litecoin Mining Guide] which also helped me get started
submitted by mycomputerisbacon to litecoinmining [link] [comments]

Extreme newb here, wondering why my gpu hashrates are so slow?

With the recent boom in bitcoin I wanted to learn more about it by mining solo on my PC just for a fun experiment. My graphics card is a Geforce GTS250. I realize this is diddly-squat compared to any reasonable mining rig but I just wanted to try as a test. I know that in all probability I will never find a block but just the small 'lottery' appeal of finding a solo mined block is enough for me to test it out
So I setup a bitcoin wallet and downloaded GUIMiner. So far I have been able to launch bitcoin QT as a server and start mining on GUIMiner as a solo miner using my GTS250 as the device.
https://en.bitcoin.it/wiki/Mining_hardware_comparison lists my card as being able to get 35Mhash, but on GUIMiner it says I am getting 650khash. I was wondering if anybody could tell me why there is such a big difference in those two numbers? Is there some important setting that I do not have correct? Sorry for the newbie questions but any help would be appreciated!
submitted by 703rd to BitcoinMining [link] [comments]

Bitcoin mining question

I was looking at https://en.bitcoin.it/wiki/Mining_hardware_comparison#Popular_Mining_Cards this chart that showed all the average mining speeds of various graphic cards and I was wondering...why are ATI cards so much better are the GPU calculations than NVidia cards given that NVidia has the CUDA software?
submitted by Xeniieeii to Bitcoin [link] [comments]

I think I'm way off on the hashrate.

I ordered this graphics card and I saw the saphire alternative on this site to see that it has a 27.0 Mhash/s rating.
Assuming the conversion from Mhash to Khash is the same from megabytes to kilobytes, I could easily see that got.... 27,000 Khash??? that doesn't see right because that means according to this calculator that would mean I was making over 15 litecoin per day. I seriously doubt it is this easy to produce these. I'm sorry for sounding like an idiot. It's late and I probably am off by a couple zeros.
submitted by theguywithacomputer to litecoinmining [link] [comments]

Is my graphics card good enough to mine?

I have a 2gb GDDR5 Nvida GT650M. I looked at a list of graphics cards and their respective performance in mining, but I couldn't make any sense of it. Here's the list.
If it is good enough, what client should I use, and would a pool be better than solo mining?
submitted by awesome0749 to Bitcoin [link] [comments]

From Bitcoin to Litecoin: A Transition Guide

Imagine a user that is coming from the Bitcoin world. The user is aware of Bitcoin basics and how it works in general. They've recently heard about Litecoin and would like to learn more about it and try it for themselves. The user is trying to decide if Litecoins are a viable option. This user might continue to use Bitcoin but with their newly gained knowledge they have the option of using Litecoin for any transactions they deem appropriate. What kind of information would be useful for their transition as an end user?
.......
Here are some starters:
1) Comparison between Litecoin and Bitcoin
2) Buying Litecoins
3) Public Address Prefixes
4) Lightweight clients are not available
5) Armory client is not available
6) The transaction fees are calculated differently between Litecoin and Bitcoin.
7) You cannot use Bitcoin ASIC mining hardware to mine Litecoins
8) Mining Litecoins using CPUs isn't cost effective
9) Mining Litecoins using your laptop is not recommended
10) Accepting Litecoin as payment on your website
11) Block explorers
12) Where to spend your Litecoins
13) Virtual currency stock exchange
TLDR; A user knows about Bitcoin and is starting into Litecoin. Any useful information for the transition?
EDIT: making edits as useful information is posted. Input has been provided by: lastgen, -Mahn
submitted by lastgen to truelitecoin [link] [comments]

Some pieces I cannot put together

I've been reading extensively on bitcoin for the past few days and there are a few holes here and there that I'm trying to understand. So far it makes me believe that this whole mining thing is some sort of elaborated scam. Here is a few unorganized points that are confusing to me.
Why are other currencies like litecoin slowly becoming popular and why people want them to become popular? What purpose do litecoin serves that bitcoin doesn't? If the second to bitcoin, a redundant currency like litecoin becomes popular and that people want it to become popular, then what's stop more of those currencies to all becoming popular making each of them just spammy/redundant at the end, don't we only need one of those currencies to serve the purpose of worldwide decentered transactions?
The so popular and referred mining hardware comparison sheet gives a list of videocard that are recommended to use. Combined with this calculator people can make some calculations to see if they should invest electricity cost into mining.
Now it seems to yield a little free income at the end of the month, all seems well until you investigate further. The power consumption of your videocard shown there is, in the radeon 6850 case, only half of what it truly use at full usage.
Now to add to this, I've been mining for more than a day at full power without stopping nor interfering in the process. It tells me I should be making 0.0125 bitcoin a day but I barely made half of that in a bit more than a day, yet I am positive the videocard ran at full strength for the whole process.
Now, double electricity cost vs half production, it becomes almost a profitless operation. To this, combined that the current bitcoin value is tenfold what it was 3 months ago, how could it have been profitable back then if it is not right now?
Now another suspicious part to me is those 2 websites 1 2. They offer what every person would ever want, a way to make a lot of money easily.
Both of them deliver their products months after purchase and, the 2nd website especially, is selling something that would potentially pays for itself back in less than a month, after which huge profit would come in. How convenient, to sell something that yields huge profit and pays itself back so quickly, better sell than use ourselves right?
The first site has sold out, and funnily enough are selling the next batch for 75 bitcoin per... which they could just mine themselves faster than their delivery time, so what's their gain really? Conveniently we have the 2nd website, not sold out, selling something similar to the 1st website, without any pictures of what the behind of their miner looks like, who won't mention anywhere the power consumption of their product but say that it comes with a usb cord, plug and play!
That sure not sound fishy at all since the asic counterpart is shown on the comparison sheet as using 600 W, for sure the usb connector hole can output that kind of power right?
Hopefully someone can shed some light on all this to the better understanding of least common asked matters, yet quite important for anyone who wants to jump in this... bandwagon...
I'm legitimately trying to see things optimistically but so far I only see a few root members trying to scam the entire world by projecting this half legit currency world unto us.
Note: sorry for my relatively poor english, I tried putting my thoughts into word as precisely as I could, but I couldn't do it as well as I wish I could.
submitted by StupidButSerious to Bitcoin [link] [comments]

[Questions] Bitcoin exchanges, etc. AND Mining

Sorry if this is obvious, I recently became interested in btc (and trading it like any other currency).
The exchanges I am aware of are Mt.Gox, Btc-E, and Bitstamp. I tend to ramble, so i'll try to keep this short:
  1. Is any other exchanges I should look at? Are any of these better than the others? (I know you all don't like Mt.Gox very much as of now)
  2. Is there a way to look up lag time for each exchange? Is it usually minutes or seconds?
  3. I noticed each exchange has different prices. at the time of writing, Mt.G is at 90, Btc-E is at 92, and Bitstamp is at 88. These numbers were farther apart right after the crash. Will these slowly all approach the same number? Do people make money buying on one exchange and selling on another?
  4. Do you have any general advice for buying selling bitcoin?
  5. I'm planning on using Btc-E and buying bitcoins using bitinstant, pushing it to my Qt wallet, and transferring it to Btc-E from there. Is there a more efficient way to push cash to Btc-E? I'm only going to push 20USD for now, just as an experiment.
  6. Is there any risk with holding USD in Btc-E? Is there something safer?
  7. A few days ago, prices were fluxating between 60 and 90 (by the half hour). Now it's pretty stable. Is this good for the strength of bitcoin? Will people take it more seriously?
  8. NEWQUESTION Is there any way to get bitcoin historical prices in csv (or any other easily parsed format)(from any exchange) like the yahoo's ichart csv (download)? NEWQUESTION Will the influx of these new ASICS affect the price of bitcoins? up? down?
Mining: My hardware is a 5770 graphics card which from bitcoin.it says I'll get about 200 MH/s. I'm hoping to make at least a buck a day (mining in a pool), again more just as an experiment.
  1. If I use linux, and don't run a DE, could I increase my MH/s? Would it be noticeable?
  2. What are your thoughts on ASICS? Is it thought that butterflylabs may be a scam? How about Avalon? Would buying one on ebay result in an unhappy scammed DrWoollyNipples?
  3. Is there any information on how these ASICS work? I'm very curious in the technology and any links would be appreciated.
Thanks, you all are amazing. Sorry for so many questions.
submitted by DrWoollyNipples to Bitcoin [link] [comments]

RTX 2060 - 6 Card Comparison - Which Should You Buy? - YouTube Wow Classic: Ultra vs. Classic Graphics Comparison - YouTube Bitcoins Erklärung: In nur 12 Min. Bitcoin verstehen ... WTF Happened to BITCOIN?! - YouTube Graphics Card Specs: The Basics - YouTube

In order to mine Ethereum, you will need specialized hardware known as graphics processing unit ... It sits at about 30.5 Megahashes per card, also at 68w (just like the 5700), but remember that even though you are only getting about half the hashing power for the same amount of power when compared to the 5700, remember that you are paying about $120 less in terms of buying the card, since a ... Bitcoin-Mining mit ASICs: Bitmain dominiert den Markt. Das Unternehmen, das sich früh als Spitze der Mining-Hardware-Industrie behauptete, ist die chinesische Firma Bitmain. Der Gigant meldete dieses Jahr in Hong Kong einen Börsengang (IPO) im Wert mehrerer Milliarden Dollar an und gab einen Prospekt heraus, der zeigte, dass die Firma 2017 Umsatz von 2,5 Milliarden USD erwirtschaftete ... Graphics card : Sapphire Radeon HD 5850 XTREME : $483 ($161 x 3) Case Fan : n/a : n/a : n/a Storage : Western Digital Caviar 80GB : NewEgg: $17 Media Drive : DVD Rom Drive : n/a : n/a Keyboard, Mouse and Display : n/a : n/a : n/a Total (Approx: $0.9677 /Mhash) $877 + s/h/t Three ATI 6990s, Approximately 2.1 Ghash/s . Component Description Source Amount Chassis : CoolerMaster HAF X : $179 Power ... Bitcoin Mining GPU Performance Comparison @ HardOCP. Published: 22nd Jul 2011, 08:06 GMT. TIMELINE. Send a tip! 03:03. Oct 1 . Alleged CPU-Z score of AMD Ryzen 9 5900X leaks out. 12:20. Sep 30 . GIGABYTE GeForce RTX 3060 Ti 8GB AORUS Master, Gaming and Eagle series listed at EEC. 11:02. Sep 30 (PR) ASUS refreshes AMD B450 motherboard series. 07:54. Sep 30 . INTEL Graphics Driver 27.20.100.8783 ... Eine umfangreiche Liste von Grafikkarten und deren Leistung für das Mining finden Sie im Bitcoin-Wiki: Mining hardware comparison. Nach dem Übergang von der CPU zur GPU wurde schon bald die Verwendung von Field Programmable Gate Arrays (FPGA) als Haupt-Mining-Plattform eingeläutet. FPGAs bewirkten keine 50 bis 100-fache Erhöhuung der Hashrate wie bei Wechsel von CPU zur GPU, stellte aber ...

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RTX 2060 - 6 Card Comparison - Which Should You Buy? - YouTube

Do you have any horror stories from ex-mining cards that you've purchased? Any recommendations for making sure you're buying a card that won't explode on you... TL;DR - Reviews and benchmarks are the most important thing to look at when buying a new graphics card. But if you ARE curious as to what these specs mean, h... Bitcoin - 80 Trillion Dollar Exit. I talk about how Bitcoin will eventually become an exit ramp from the crashing 80 trillion dollar financial system, the ec... Squarespace link: Visit http://squarespace.com/techquickie and use offer code TECHQUICKIE to save 10% off your first order. Why did Bitcoin's value crash aft... Start trading Bitcoin and cryptocurrency here: http://bit.ly/2Vptr2X Bitcoin is the first decentralized digital currency. All Bitcoin transactions are docume...

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